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Single-Genus Tank: Which plant genus would you choose?


Chrissy
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If you had to choose ONLY ONE genus of plant to scape with for a new tank, which genus of plant would you choose?
I would likely go with either the cryptocoryne or anubias genus. There's so many different different species (AND SUBSPECIES) with differing sizes/colors/textures to them, the possibilities are endless ūüėé

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11 minutes ago, Streetwise said:

I would probably do that too. What are the other major genera in the hobby?

There are a lot of Utricularia, many with pretty flowers but the foliage is not quite as pretty as Bucephalandra or Ludwigia as @ange suggests. You could do Eleocharis there are a 100 of those, but your tank would look like a prairie. ūüôā

I'd think about Sagittaria too, lots of variety there. Lots of opportunity to explore immersed and emmersed also (same with Cryptocoryne).

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Alright I'll play!

Crypts and anubius are killer of course (obvious choice)

I know their isn't much variety by comparison but I LOVE Vallisneria a tank of it is always eye stopping.

But my other favourite choice would be Potamogeton as I've collected many wild specimens (crispus, perfoliatus, ochreatus, wrightii etc)

Both have some pretty awesome variety, cool styles and unique colours too. Especially when you look at all the species possible.

Pretty damn easy plants too.

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I think I'd choose Hygrophila. Another bulletproof genus with a lot of variety that usually does well in my hard water. I could scape an entire tank with polysperma Rosanervig, siamensis 53b, pinnatifida, araguaia, and variegated difformis and enjoy looking at it. 

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  • 1 month later...

I was researching Bucephalandra a bit today, and I learned a new term.

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rheophyte

"A rheophyte is an aquatic plant that lives in fast moving water currents in an environment where few other organisms can survive. Rheophytes tend to be found in currents that move at rates of 1 to 2 meters per second and that are up to 3 to 6 feet deep. The amount of force produced by these currents, and the damaging debris they can carry, makes this environment inhospitable to most plants. Rheophytes are able to live in such environments because their leaves are streamlined so as put up little resistance to the flow of water. The leaves tend to be quite narrow and flexible as well. In order to prevent the plants from being uprooted, Rheophytes have an extremely strong wide spreading root systems. 

Many Rheophytes live in areas that sustain flash floods and they are dependent on the oxygenated water and buoyancy brought along with it. Simply being an aquatic plant with narrow leaves is not a sufficient condition for being a Rheophyte. Also, plants that grow in slow moving water that occasionally receive fast currents aren't Rheophytes either if they don't need these fast currents to survive. Plants that fall into this category are known as facultative rheophytes. When low water levels occur Rheophytes often quickly begin to flower to take advantage of these occurrences.

Examples of rheophytic ferns are Asplenium obtusifolium, Osmunda lancea, and Tectaria lobbii."

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3 hours ago, Streetwise said:

I was researching Bucephalandra a bit today, and I learned a new term.

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rheophyte

"A rheophyte is an aquatic plant that lives in fast moving water currents in an environment where few other organisms can survive. Rheophytes tend to be found in currents that move at rates of 1 to 2 meters per second and that are up to 3 to 6 feet deep. The amount of force produced by these currents, and the damaging debris they can carry, makes this environment inhospitable to most plants. Rheophytes are able to live in such environments because their leaves are streamlined so as put up little resistance to the flow of water. The leaves tend to be quite narrow and flexible as well. In order to prevent the plants from being uprooted, Rheophytes have an extremely strong wide spreading root systems. 

Many Rheophytes live in areas that sustain flash floods and they are dependent on the oxygenated water and buoyancy brought along with it. Simply being an aquatic plant with narrow leaves is not a sufficient condition for being a Rheophyte. Also, plants that grow in slow moving water that occasionally receive fast currents aren't Rheophytes either if they don't need these fast currents to survive. Plants that fall into this category are known as facultative rheophytes. When low water levels occur Rheophytes often quickly begin to flower to take advantage of these occurrences.

Examples of rheophytic ferns are Asplenium obtusifolium, Osmunda lancea, and Tectaria lobbii."

You plant nerds... I'm just now learning how to keep them (mostly)¬†alive.ūüėÜ

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 1/8/2021 at 5:07 PM, StephenP2003 said:

You plant nerds... I'm just now learning how to keep them (mostly)¬†alive.ūüėÜ

Me too. So I'm going with Anubus because it's the first plant I bought and it's not dead yet. I did buy Val and Amazon sword. They're not dead either but I do like the Anubus best.

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