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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/23/2020 in all areas

  1. When giving advice in a post it can be helpful to explain the thinking behind the advice you are giving and your personal experience that leads you to feeling confident about the specific advice your are giving. I'll give an example. The original post reads something like this: Help! I think my fish have fungus, what should I do?? The next forum member giving advice says: 'Treat with salt' What is missing in the answer is quite a bit. Why salt? What does salt do to a fungus? Is there any situation that salt would not be appropriate? Have you personally had a fish with a fungal infection that you treated with salt, and if so, what were these results? Maybe something like this would be even more helpful: 'One common treatment for fungus is to use aquarium salt. My Serpae tetra recently had a fungal infection and I treated with salt. I left the salt in the water until the fungus cleared up (which was about a week). After that I did a water change. If the fungus had come back, I would have dosed with salt again at a higher concentration for an additional week. Salt works by dehydrating the fungus, which kills the fungus (but not the fish). Do you have plants in your aquarium? If so you need to know that plants are sensitive to salt so you might need to move your fish to a quarantine tank if you intend to treat with salt.' Not every post has to be this detailed, but the additional information can be very helpful and educational, which is one of the prime reasons we are all here.
    24 points
  2. I generally do not put lids on any of my aquariums. While I do get evaporation, I've never had a problem with fish jumping out. I have had a consistent problem with plants jumping out witness this photo from July: But now I think I know what is happening: Anyone one else have a problem with plants being jumpers?
    20 points
  3. Maybe I should have posted on "Potential Aquarium Co-Op Products" Who would not want some Mr. Dean multi-purpose spray (it is lavender scented!).
    19 points
  4. A viewer said I was a hybrid of Cory and Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson! 🤣🤣🤣🤣
    15 points
  5. Sometimes not thinking at all works. I know I do it all the time. I have several very happy tanks that have a light (Stingray) some hornwort (or water sprite) and airstone. In one tank the livebearers and dwarf cichlids are breeding constantly. In another tank the zebrafish and guppies are multiplying. I don't change the water. I don't know what the water parameters are as I have never checked. Both tanks had a lot of algae at one point early on but I didn't do anything about it. The algae went away on its own after a bit. Less can be more.
    15 points
  6. So.... on some thread a little while ago, someone asked for “dream tank” setup... or dream fish.... can’t quite remember. ANYWAY— my answer was “Native North American Species tank featuring Rainbow Shiners + Rainbow Darters.” Today (drum roll....) the Rainbow Shiners arrived! We’ll see how they settle in long term. Here’s specs + a few photos: 29 gal. 63-degrees Fahrenheit. Emperor bio wheel 280 HOB filter + sponge filter. Mexican beach pebbles (large) plus smoothed landscaping stones. Small dried oak leaves added. Valisneria Americana. Bronze crypt. Hydor powerhead. Cheap LED filtered light + 1x blue coral fluorescent tube. Eco Complete substrate. Small aged piece of mopani wood. 35x Notropis chrosomus (Rainbow Shiners). 1x pair of Etheostoma caeruleum (Rainbow Darters).
    13 points
  7. My fish art... Of course I drew my favorite fish, my Synodontis eupterus, Pooka My favorite Polypterus senegalus, Dragon. And I've done some ancient fish illustrations for Paleontology...
    13 points
  8. As I sit here (listening to a 4-month-old Aquarium Coop livestream, incidentally), I'm thinking about what good things happened in 2020. Aquarium Coop is, for me, one of the best things that "happened" to me in 2020. I've been out of the hobby for 15-20 years, and I decided to set up a tank this summer after spending time with my partner's niece who is really into fish and nature in general. I found Cory's channel, and then the forum, and then related channels from the community, and it's just been the best thing. Not only for my rediscovered aquarium hobby, but because Cory's attitude and approach to business restores my faith in humanity. (I'm not even joking.) I've placed two orders from the Coop, and the team is just great. Loved getting my little "mystery" decals...they're super fun, and now I want to keep placing orders until I get the corydoras sticker, haha! (Oh and Coop plants truly are the best...I hope there will be even more variety in the future...) So, thank you to Cory and the entire Aquarium Coop team, and thank you to folks on this forum who have been so nice and helpful. I've really enjoyed this oasis of positivity. I hope all of you have a peaceful holiday season. If this is not a holiday season for you I still wish you a peaceful end of 2020. 🙂
    13 points
  9. 12 points
  10. Hi. I wanted to share my second go at aquascaping.. I got a 90lt/25 US gallon tall tank for Christmas with the intention of filling it with driftwood and all the extra plants that have popped up everywhere in my nano tanks. However, at the last minute I decided to do something totally different. I wanted a whole tiny landscape, carpeting plants, perspective trickery, crystal clear water and eventually a shoal of tiny fish to swim through the sky. I spent a long time choosing the plants I wanted and settled on Hemianthus callitricoides 'Cuba' as my carpeting plant... I didn't realise this was baby tears 😬 so, we'll see how that does with liquid carbon and not as much light as it would like!😂 I don't actually mind if it doesn't carpet, I think it looks cool tufty. I went for Helanthium tenellum for my grassy Tufts. Christmas moss on top of the rocks and Taxiphyllum on the tree. I used the same Tropica substrate, because I had such great groeth with it before. All the plants I used were in-vitro tissue culture plants and I love them. Unfortunately two pots of the Taxiphyllum wasn't enough to finish the tree so I'll have to order more.. just going to wait a week or so and see what happens with the baby tears. Thanks for stopping by to check it out 😁
    12 points
  11. I made this for refilling tanks so I don't have to lift a bucket, splash water everywhere, disturb substrate, etc. It's a Cobalt MJ1200 pump, some push connect fittings, 90° barb, silicone tubing, and a switch on the outlet to control it. I use an extension cord to keep the switch in my hand.
    12 points
  12. I was asked in another thread to video this tank today, so here goes. The sera o-nip tabs featured here are the classic original kind. I only have 6 left 😞 Enjoy the music which was included with Cyberlink Powerdirector. Fun fact: every plant you see in this tank was purchased from the co-op, except for the cabomba.
    12 points
  13. I think the line between informing and policing in the hobby can be a bit thin, especially when it's unsolicited. There is a fish store a couple of hours from me that has a huge amount of negative reviews because "his tanks are dirty" and that according to them, is abusive to the fish. I have been in there multiple times. He has a designated handful of tanks for raising Ancistrus and feeding Ottos, he also has a couple of green water tanks. He is limited on space and can't hide those tanks in a backroom somewhere to make it more aesthetically pleasing to people walking in. So he ends up with bad reviews from people who firmly believe that a few unsightly tanks means he doesn't perform the "once a week water change, keep tanks squeaky clean" maintenance schedule that the internet told them to do. There is such a broad spectrum of what determines "good fish care" in this hobby that I think more time should be invested in learning and experiencing collectively, rather than trying to teach.
    12 points
  14. 11 points
  15. There's an old proverb: "When the student is ready, the teacher will appear." I started getting really into this hobby a few years ago, and began watching a lot of YouTube videos. At first, I watched certain (unnamed) high-energy, high-intensity YouTubers. They definitely amped up my interest in the hobby, but over time I ended up sitting on the couch riveted to watching this dude just sit and talk about fish for hours at a time. This guy from somewhere out in Washington State . . . totally transformed my hobby. Then one day, he showed up at our fish club in Virginia! I'd say that the brand Aquarium Co-Op, and this whole forum exists for the purpose of aquatic education. HUGE THANK YOU CO-OP TEAM!
    11 points
  16. I am curious what everyone uses for their fish tank that is not necessarily made for this hobby. Maybe it’s something from Amazon maybe you made your own specialty tool maybe it’s upcycled from the trash! Show me your favorite most used tool and tell me what it’s for! Mine is one of those forks they use in flower bouquets to hold the card. It’s great for poking around the tank or rolling my moss balls around when I don’t feel like sticking my hand in.
    10 points
  17. Now that I have a macro lens for my phone, I want to document the development of my honey gouramis from birth to their trip to the local fish store. To start, here’s Dad Fish, Parent of the Year, and Mom Fish, who’s very camera shy. These babies hatched yesterday. Unfortunately I forgot I wanted to do this and didn’t get pictures of the eggs. At this point I believe they’re about 36 hours old. They’re only very occasionally starting their little motors to swim for a short spurt. Mostly they’re just hanging. Lastly here’s Dad Fish trying to intimidate me. Instead he just looks derpy. (Don’t tell him I said that though!)
    10 points
  18. The male undulates and flicks to the nearby female and leads her into his nest. There she snacks on a few eggs but also lays a few eggs. He vibrates with ecstasy as he fertilizes the eggs she deposits. After she leaves he continues to vibrate.
    10 points
  19. In this tank, my Gourami has a gang of Platy minions. 🤭
    10 points
  20. Don't chase numbers; ph, gh, kh, TDS, etc. As long as your water is safe and habitable your aquatic inhabitants will adapt just fine.
    10 points
  21. Today I was able to get a 40g breeder donated to a substance abuse/mental health residential facility and I am going to be stocking it with a few fancy goldfish for the guys in treatment to take care of. I like to promote the wellness/mental health benefits of aquarium keeping. Maybe I will be able to convert a few hobbyists in the process!
    10 points
  22. The ozelot sword plant in my 20 long has shot out a stem almost 30" long, and has 3 nodes with multiple blooms and/or leaves on each.
    10 points
  23. 29 days old at this point. I'm feeding baby brine twice a day. The babies hide along the plants now and are rarely at the surface anymore. It makes pictures a bit more of a challenge. They are getting some good size to them now with more coloration. I saw one of them puffed up but wasn't able to get my camera out fast enough. It was super cute though.
    10 points
  24. Was a pretty yesterday morning view out the window.
    10 points
  25. Hello all, been lurking here a while and greatly enjoying the content. I thought I might contribute back to any other newbies with experiences similar to mine who don't know how big plants will get, etc. I have a 20 long pseudo-walstad I've been working on for a while. It was initially planted a few months ago: Most of the plants were purchased from the Co-op: Vallisneria, Chain sword, Water sprite, Hydrocotyle tripartita, Windelov java fern, a lily bulb, and a few Cryptocoryne wendtii brown and dwarf sagittaria I already had from another tank. Soil layer was about and inch thick with a half-inch of sand per Dr. Walstad's reccommendation in her book. The hardscape is placed on a hill made of filter bags full of Seachem flourite, to keep pressure off the dirt. I didn't originally plan to document this, so unfortunately I didn't take a picture of that stage. I had a very heavy algae and bacteria bloom for the first few weeks but it eventually resolved itself with time and pest snails. I had to remove the coconut, as it created a dead spot and had a heavy amount of bacterial growth inside. Here is a few months later: As you can see, everything is extremely overgrown. I think the lily may have been a poor choice for a tank this size, as the lily pads have to be trimmed almost bi-weekly to keep it from shading out the other plants. And the sword is filling in extremely slowly, making the right corner look a little more empty than I intended. I also added an Aquaclear 30 to the right side, so I suppose this is more of a pseudo-Walstad dirted tank than a true Walstad aquarium, but whatever. Sponge intake cover is also from the co-op. I have a few guppies and approximately 15 or so fry in the tank, all doing well. One more picture from this morning, after I added some pearlweed and Hydrocotyle leucephala courtesy of LRB Aquatics (does he have an account here? would tag him if I knew the handle): Thanks for looking 🙂
    9 points
  26. This is a brief overview of the tools and techniques I've used to build three aquarium canopies this way. My intent with building a canopy is to block the glare from the lights and light spillage into the rooms. I also want enough room inside the canopy to be able to reach in the tanks if I have to without having to remove it. I use 1/2" Sande Plywood for a nice paintable surface while still being lightweight enough to lift on and off. It does require a moderate set of wood working tools and the knowledge to use them. I used the following. Tablesaw and Dado blade set Miter saw Kreg Pocket Screw Jig Drill To start I take measurements of the aquarium frame that'll determine the inside dimensions of the canopy. This is a 48x18, 90 gallon tank. I like the canopy to cover the black plastic frame of the tank. You could extend this lower to cover the water line as well. Once I determined the dimensions I use a tablesaw to rip the plywood to length. I like to start by assembling the front of the canopy where the doors are. I found a 10" tall opening was good for fitting my arm in and out of easily. I assembly the entire canopy using pocket screws drilled with a jig. I then make the sides of the canopy. I use a stack of dado blades to cut a groove in the sides. The groove will hold a strip of wood the will sit on top of the aquarium frame, holding it up in place. I screw the sides into the inside of the canopy front so that the cut edge will be hidden from the front view. I attach the back of the canopy the same way as the sides. I screwed the back panel on within the inside of the canopy so the side hides the edge of the back panel. At this time I glue in a strip of wood cut to a specific width to fit fully into the dado and extend out enough to sit on the rim of the aquarium frame. Take care not to make it too wide so you can get the glass lids on and off. Test fit confirms all is good to proceed. After that the top is the last major piece followed by fitting the doors. I found a 1/2" overlap on the doors is good. These are the hinges I use. Finally I attach some simple trim around the top to hide the edge of the top panel to give it a nice look. I painted with a semi-gloss black paint. I don't have any filter equipment running over the rim of this tank but you could trim out to allow access for filer tubes, HOBS, etc. I do plan on trimming a small access cutout on the back, for wires and airline, once I determine the light orientation. I'm no expert woodworker but I found this easy to make. May it serve as inspiration for you to design and build your own aquarium canopy instead of buying one.
    9 points
  27. I am over the moon excited about my first guppy babies!! They may “just” be guppies but I’ve never bred anything before and it’s absolutely amazing. I was planning to just leave them with the parents and let the strong survive, but their little eyes melted my heart and so I set up a little makeshift breeder box for them in my plant grow out tank, by cutting the bottom out of an (old and thoroughly washed) litter box and stretching pantyhose over the bottom!
    9 points
  28. This is the process I used for drilling my next display tank. Its a 90 gallon tank with 1/4" inch thick glass. I'm drilling to install bulkheads to attach a canister filter too. Drilling a tank isn't as scary as you think if you've never done it before. You just have to go slow and have confidence, once you start there is no going back. It is more difficult and more likely to break on thinner glass, 1/8" or less. The tools I used were: Power drill. I think a two speed drill is best. Used on the lowest setting so you can't go too fast. Drill guide. I like this one with the suction cup. It held really well and has a port to attach a water line too. Squeeze bottle & aquarium airline. The bottle is from Dollar Tree, while not water tight, a thick wrapping of Teflon tape around the threads solves that. I found the Marina blue airline fit onto the nipple of the drill guide the easiest and onto the squeeze bottle. Some flat scrapes of wood and toolbox drawer liner Glass drill bit (obviously). I used a 35mm bit for a 3/4" bulkhead. I didn't want to do it outside with a hose because it was cold and snowing out at the time. I drilled it in my kitchen without making a mess at all. I used the flat scrapes of wood to wedge inside the tank as a brace when drilling. It helps contain everything once you get through the glass and maybe helps prevent some chip out. I used the liner against the glass to prevent the wood from slipping and wedged the piece between them to hold it tight. Go time. I wrapped a towel around the guide to contain the glass dust slurry. I had someone help by squeezing the bottle at a steady rate while I was drilling. I used the lowest speed and set the drill's clutch to the drill setting. Use both hands to hold the drill and keep it as straight as possible. Don't push too hard, especially on thinner glass, hold the drill tight and push down lightly, let the drill bit do the work. It takes time to get through thick glass, just go slow. You'll feel less resistance as you get closer to punching through, ease up on the pressure at that point until you're all the way through. Once you're through the hard part is over, except getting the plug of glass out the bit. Prying with a screwdriver in the slots gets it out. Removing the guide I found very little mess. Easy clean up. You can see the toolbox liner twisted and caught the bit as it punched through. I think that is actually beneficial, like a soft stop/landing for the process. I re-positioned the setup exactly the same and drilled a second hole, also successful.
    9 points
  29. I started with 3 Amano shrimp and they did great for a few weeks so I got 3 more. The next morning I found 3 of the 6. Then a few days later just 1. Then none. OK, I hear they are good at hiding. A week goes by...none to be found. Now I'm concerned and curious. I look under every rock in the tank. Nothing. Maybe they have some sort of stealth technology that lets them go invisible? THe more I look into it, the more I read about them climbing out and looking for other water. Uh, oh. I look all over the floor, and sure enough I find one crispy Amano shrimp. Dang it. I then look all over for more. No more to find. Maybe when they die with the cloaking mode on they stay invisible? A few days later after Christmas (and a short...Jesus it would be cool if... prayer...) I see one climbing on my HOB filter! A Christmas miracle! No more to be found, in the tank or out. This past weekend I was at the LFS and of course I can't resist and get 3 more. The next day...gone! Now I feel bad for these shrimp I keep sentencing to a short life of crawling across dusty hardwood floors. So another prayer (what can I say...I believe it works) and back to work. Yesterday I was getting my new 40g tank ready and I took the HOB filter to the bathroom to pull the media for the new tank/filter. It is a Tidal 55 so it has the handy bucker like thing you pull out with the media in it. As I am draining that I see movement in the bucket. What is that? Well I'll be...an Amano shrimp. I take the media out and...two more are sitting in the bottom! I then look into the filter body (main black part) and sure enough, 3 more are sitting there together looking at me with an expression of, "What? All the food we could want and privacy. What did you expect?" Mystery solved. Amano shrimp are remarkably clever, good climbers, very social, and if they can find a hiding spot...they will go there and you will never see them. No stealth cloaking tech...just well honed instincts.
    9 points
  30. I use my microscope on a daily basis to observe the happenings in my aquariums and I needed a way to take photos with my phone. I made this adapter with an eyepiece out of our kitchen cutting board to hold the phone while shooting photos and video.
    9 points
  31. I carry this little scoop I 3D printed nearly everywhere. It's sized at .1 tsp and shaped as a just right fit into the bottles I like to use to feed out dry food and measure out baby brine eggs. The back end contains a strong magnet so I can stick it to whatever while I feed and do maintenance and having a magnet always on had is handy now and then.
    9 points
  32. I feel like this thread should probably be moved to the forum for posting fish photos. :3 At the moment, I have blue wags. I want to add some more variety though.
    9 points
  33. So I found what I thought was an an amazing looking juvenile male guppy in my "cull" tank this June. I call him Mr. Marble because he reminds me of a blue marble betta coloration. So I shared his photo on Facebook and asked opinions on trying to create my own guppy strain from him... well I was talked down to by a guppy YouTube personality that I made a mutt and well I almost gave up the hobby. A few weeks went and I said Self who cares what he says put him in a tank and try to make more. So 6 months later and I have a mini Mr Marble. I still have a long way to go but I am excited that I am on the right track... I hope. I have a few more juveniles males that look like they will look at lot like dad and brother and in another week or two I should know for sure. I believe Mr Marble came from a blue and white strain ive been developing for just under 2 years now I call Blue Dreams but because he was in my cull tank I can't be sure. I have no idea if anyone else would ever be interested in my blue marble guppies if in a few years I can claim it as a set strain because they are short tails but I love them. The females are starting to get some white coloration on their top lines. Anyways I will share some photos and you can let you me know your thoughts. I shared the long tail blue dreams I think is where he popped up from.
    9 points
  34. I was thinking a coop calendar would be cool. It could contain Jimmy's aquarium photography or forum members tanks.
    9 points
  35. Spotted a new Corydora that somehow eluded the hungry mouths of the other fish and grew just big enough to no longer be considered a snack.
    9 points
  36. It is so fun capturing photos of the tiny little worlds we create in our living room!
    9 points
  37. Long-fin black (green?) tetra
    9 points
  38. I wish there was an underwater remote controlled submarine 4k camera that would swim in my aquarium and stream the results back to my phone. I could watch fish breed and check on fry from anywhere. And if I were in a boring meeting, I could get out my phone and watch my fish instead.
    9 points
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