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Bentley Pascoe

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  1. I almost feel bad for the person selling those Tuna Suns - very, very expensive lights with the goose necks - you and one other person got a STEAL! I'm glad you enjoyed my talk, I'm hoping to have it online reasonably soon once I get the footage from the club's videographer.
  2. Oh I can't grow anything. Ludwigia 'Tornado' still eludes me!
  3. Usually orange/red streaks or spots are indications of deeper wild genes in some guppies - it can sometimes point to a line bred guppy reverting some as the line starts to lose it's purity - this is not always the case, just a little interesting tid-bit I picked up.
  4. @ChemBob appears to have summoned me! Howdy! I would concur that certainly looks like an emersed wendtii crypt of some form, and very likely pink flamingo. The fun part, get ready to lose those leaves and hopefully at the same time see new growth show up. In my experience, it can be a little rough to get that ultra pink color without some CO2 injection, but not impossible. Flamingo really responds well to strong light, which is somewhat the opposite of most crypts who tend to like less powerful light for longer durations to really kick off and be happy. I'm not sure what light you're using, but if you can, push the yellow/orange/red spectrums of your light some, that will help quite a bit and make sure you have some root tabs under it to help in the conversion process. Best of luck! - a random plant nerd.
  5. Depending on how you're dosing your fertilizer (and how much compared to size of tank) my first inclination here is those water sprite aren't getting enough nitrogen. Here's an article from the Co-Op blog that can give you some extra details on telling plant healthy and associated issues: https://www.aquariumcoop.com/blogs/aquarium/plant-nutrient-deficiencies?_pos=1&_sid=42bd4337f&_ss=r Personally, I try to space my fertilizer usage out. So if I'm going to dose a 40g Breeder that is very dense in it's planting, I would dose something like 1 pump of easy green per day rather than 4 pumps twice per week. This keeps a continuous lean source of nutrients in my water which helps plants consistently grow and remain robust. You can of course adjust this if you use CO2 or find it to be not enough when testing your water. The goal is to have a semi-constant 10-20ppm nitrate in the water at all times, this means there is constantly something for the plants to use. It takes a little time to get used to it, but once you get in the habit and dial it in, you'll never go back.
  6. Some notes: The Blue Hawaiian Moscows have been super stable for me as a fish, but they do like surprisingly softer water than your usual guppy. I don't buffer quite as hard as someone like Cory would in our water. Hopefully they do well for you and the near proverb of most fish applies, once you get to the second generation born in your water, you should be gold from there on out. I just hope you enjoy the color as much as I do - the camera really cannot capture the full beauty those little fish have!
  7. I'm not sure how a Fluval Plant 3.0 could look dim, its a fairly powerful light. It does have a warmer cast (yellow looking tint to the human eye) that some other lights, where as most lights with a blue/cool cast look "brighter" its just how they present to the human eye and almost nothing to do with how much actual light is being produced by the fixture.
  8. I have not, all of mine had the default.
  9. Yes you could in theory, just keep in mind that you should expect that corner to have very limited light (great for anubias and buce!) so don't look at putting things like stems or swords over there, they will almost certainly do poor/die.
  10. One should do the trick with what you're planning. Most of those plants don't need high light, they prefer a longer photo period which most of my settings provide quite well. I had swords under Day Sim and they did phenomenal.
  11. How do I get these in my life?! I would love a micro-nerite like this, especially since it can actually breed. I personally am on the train that snails are very good for an aquarium and can be used to tell you a ton of things (when you're over feeding for example). If anyone finds a way to get these into the US, sign me up for like...50.
  12. I get this really often when cleaning up my pleco tanks due to the amount of "gunk" left over from those messy fish and a little bit of wood the also munch on. Typically what I see happen is a build up of the gunk I've been vacuuming up plugging up the tube at the actual connection to the sink (the green 3-way valve). How I resolve this is by keeping my water draining then carefully, for only a few seconds, pushing the twist ring up (as if switching to fill a tank) then immediately dropping it back down to drain, this moves the gunk pile around in the plastic housing and helps to break it up. That plastic housing is a bit more narrow than the tubes and can get clogged fast, especially if you accidently vacuum up a few smaller snails/old shells. After you get used to doing it a few times in tanks that produce a lot of mulm - you can tell just by flow "oh, time to clear the clog!" and it has pretty minimal impact on your water change time.
  13. Otocinclus also love this stuff. Pretty much any of your "algae control" types will devour it.
  14. If you can hang it, I would do so. You only need like 4-5" above the tank to get really good spread. All mine sit on rim, which does work, but in a perfect world I would have a riser or hang them.
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