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Breeding corydoras


Jimmy
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On 8/21/2021 at 6:51 AM, Colu said:

I got a eight young fish to start my group ended up with 5 females 3 males and they breed  really well for me I feeded them plenty of frozen and live foods such and blood worms micro worms  and good quality pellets and bottom feeder wafers to bring them in to breeding condition

I can’t wait to start spoiling some corydoras. Do you do any cold water changes and if so what kind of difference. Also, what sand you keeping them on?

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On 8/22/2021 at 12:46 AM, Jimmy said:

I plan on doing species myself. I’m probably going to do 3-4. Any harm in starting them in 10s!

Depending on the species some of the smaller  species like panda or pygmy or habrosus would fine in a 10 gallon some of the larger species like Bronze Cory's or paleatus will need a bigger tank long term

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My first group of 5 spawned in a community tank 1 female 4 male. Unfortunately my guppies ate the eggs and the fanwort they spawned on was shredded. I added 6 more juvenile to increase my chances of some survivor eggs. I have added a plastic plant mat thing last week hidden almond leaf covering. panda Cory can get in but guppies cannot. Yesterday they started following the female she went inside. I can’t see but I’m hopeful. 
 

just wanted to share some ideas with you 😁

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Jimmy;

It's impossible to tell a male and female Cory apart when you buy them because they are still quite young. You'll need to buy several and keep them together for a couple of months before you'll see that the females will be plumper and longer while the males will be shorter and skinnier.

According to two books I consulted on breeding Cories, you'll want a tank of no less than 10g, you'll want a ratio of two males for each female, you'll want the water to be soft and acidic as these are blackwater fish. You'll also want the water temp to be about 85 degrees to mimic the water temp of the Amazon River basin where these fish originated.

There are over 100 species of Cories, but mine are Bronze Cories, I have one male and three females in a 10g tank along with 18 Neon Tetra's, and my Cories lay fertile eggs about every three months. I have a male and female in another 10g tank and they also lay fertile eggs, but not as often.  I have a male and two females in a 29g tank and they also lay fertile eggs about once every five or six months, but now I have five Cories in this tank and I haven't bought any to add to any of these tanks.

Depending upon species, they'll lay between 30 to 1,000 eggs with a 30% to 40% hatch rate, my Cories lay about 50 eggs each time. 

They'll lay eggs first thing in the morning and if they're hungry, they'll eat the eggs immediately. 

To keep all of my fish in all of my tanks, in condition to breed I give them a variety of foods. I'll start with a flake food, the next day I'll give them Bug bites, the next day I'll give them frozen Brine shrimp, the next day it's pureed nightcrawlers, the next day it's freeze-dried Tubifex worms, the next day it's frozen Bloodworms, and then I start all over again.

Once they are finished laying eggs, it's best to remove the parents to another tank, unplug the heater so the water temp will drop, the eggs hatch faster at lower temps. Add Methylene blue to the tank to keep fungus from attacking the eggs, and a species only tank is the best way to go with these really cool fish.

Sincerely

Gator

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I've spawned several types of corydoras, all have been in 10 gallon tanks, except the bronze that spawn regularly in my big display tank. the eggs always get eaten though in there unless I pull them to hatch artificially. In the 10 gallon tanks, I have spawned weitzmani, sterbai, pygmy, venezuelanus, and aspidoras spilotus. The pygmy and spilotus I keep all the time in the 10 gal, the others are in larger tanks with other fish, but I move them to a ten to spawn them. When I want to spawn, I put the group into the tank with a little bit of sand substrate, feed the heavy live blackworms and frozen brine and bloodworms for a few days. Then, I do approx a 50% water change using water that is a few degrees cooler than the tank water. A lot of times, I will do this at the same time that a storm system is supposed to come through, the difference in air pressure will sometimes trigger them. I notice some, especially my bronze cories, will spawn without a water change when a big storm system come through. I usually pull eggs and hatch artificially, using a butter container or something similar floating in the tank so it keeps the bowl warm. A drop of methylene blue or hydrogen peroxide to help combat fungus and wait a few days. 

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On 8/23/2021 at 7:40 AM, Andy's Fish Den said:

I've spawned several types of corydoras, all have been in 10 gallon tanks, except the bronze that spawn regularly in my big display tank. the eggs always get eaten though in there unless I pull them to hatch artificially. In the 10 gallon tanks, I have spawned weitzmani, sterbai, pygmy, venezuelanus, and aspidoras spilotus. The pygmy and spilotus I keep all the time in the 10 gal, the others are in larger tanks with other fish, but I move them to a ten to spawn them. When I want to spawn, I put the group into the tank with a little bit of sand substrate, feed the heavy live blackworms and frozen brine and bloodworms for a few days. Then, I do approx a 50% water change using water that is a few degrees cooler than the tank water. A lot of times, I will do this at the same time that a storm system is supposed to come through, the difference in air pressure will sometimes trigger them. I notice some, especially my bronze cories, will spawn without a water change when a big storm system come through. I usually pull eggs and hatch artificially, using a butter container or something similar floating in the tank so it keeps the bowl warm. A drop of methylene blue or hydrogen peroxide to help combat fungus and wait a few days. 

This is great information. I’m screen shotting it. I already have a small understanding of how to breed them but no sense in not being teachable. Can’t wait to get a couple groups going

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On 8/22/2021 at 10:57 PM, Gator said:

Jimmy;

It's impossible to tell a male and female Cory apart when you buy them because they are still quite young. You'll need to buy several and keep them together for a couple of months before you'll see that the females will be plumper and longer while the males will be shorter and skinnier.

According to two books I consulted on breeding Cories, you'll want a tank of no less than 10g, you'll want a ratio of two males for each female, you'll want the water to be soft and acidic as these are blackwater fish. You'll also want the water temp to be about 85 degrees to mimic the water temp of the Amazon River basin where these fish originated.

There are over 100 species of Cories, but mine are Bronze Cories, I have one male and three females in a 10g tank along with 18 Neon Tetra's, and my Cories lay fertile eggs about every three months. I have a male and female in another 10g tank and they also lay fertile eggs, but not as often.  I have a male and two females in a 29g tank and they also lay fertile eggs about once every five or six months, but now I have five Cories in this tank and I haven't bought any to add to any of these tanks.

Depending upon species, they'll lay between 30 to 1,000 eggs with a 30% to 40% hatch rate, my Cories lay about 50 eggs each time. 

They'll lay eggs first thing in the morning and if they're hungry, they'll eat the eggs immediately. 

To keep all of my fish in all of my tanks, in condition to breed I give them a variety of foods. I'll start with a flake food, the next day I'll give them Bug bites, the next day I'll give them frozen Brine shrimp, the next day it's pureed nightcrawlers, the next day it's freeze-dried Tubifex worms, the next day it's frozen Bloodworms, and then I start all over again.

Once they are finished laying eggs, it's best to remove the parents to another tank, unplug the heater so the water temp will drop, the eggs hatch faster at lower temps. Add Methylene blue to the tank to keep fungus from attacking the eggs, and a species only tank is the best way to go with these really cool fish.

Sincerely

Gator

Thanks for the great information can’t wait to report back

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