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Hydra and Hair Algae Advice


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Situation: 

55 gallon. Lightly planted. 1 angelfish. 3 species of snails (MTS, ramshorn, bladder).

8 days ago, the water was suddenly cloudy. Parameters: Ammonia 0, Nitrite 0, Nitrate 10-30. I kept feeding the angel, but stopped feeding the snails. 

4 days ago, the water was still cloudy, so I also stopped feeding the angel. 

This morning, I woke up to clear water... and the first hydra and hair algae I've ever seen. 

Most of the plants were purchased just days to weeks before the cloudiness started. I assume the hydra and hair algae rode in on them.

I've read/watched the links below, but still have questions. 

The main thing I don't understand is what the hydra is eating. I've never put live foods in the tank, and hadn't fed the tank at all for 4 days before finding the hydra. How is it even alive?

I think I'll be able to ditch the hair algae by figuring out how to balance my light and ferts for the plants. Right?

If you have suggestions for animals to eat hydra or hair algae, I'm game to research them. (Take into account that the angel is more aggressive than most.)

Thanks for any ideas or insights.

https://www.aquariumcoop.com/blogs/aquarium/hydra

https://www.aquariumcoop.com/blogs/aquarium/aquarium-algae

 

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I first noticed hydra in a tank that had water, substrate, a few plants, and some pest snails.  I wasn't feeding the tank at all.  The hydra thrived.  My Bettas don't eat them, but my Sparkling Gouramis, Platies and Guppies/Endlers will clean up a tank.  I call the Sparklers my Movable Feast, because if I see Hydra I relocate a couple of them into the tank until the numbers are down enough that I don't see any more.

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I am new to the hobby so can't can't answer your question about the Hydra as I sterilize all my plants by bleach before they go into the tank, however, I also had hair algae, Green and Brown. The Green showed due to (I think) to much light, food and liquid fert. Also, the tank was a new tank going through its biological maturing, once the algae started dying the water became cloudy, clarifier did help. The Brown Hair Algae is on its way out. six weeks or so ago I bought Amazon Frogbit, a week later most of it rot and  disintegrated causing cloudy water. I have changed water every week and stopped the liquid fert. Before changing the water I shook the algae of the plants and roots and let it go into the pre-filter, then cleaned the filter. This week the first signs of the algae clear tank can be seen.

I hope that this helps and gives you some ideas.

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From what I researched in biology studies when I found them in one of my tanks Hydra when small feed on bacteria paramecium Protozoa then ostracod amphipods microworms if they grow large or cover most surfaces shrimplets small egg fry are targeted. They are in the air as cysts and “dust” particles and are a natural part of an ecosystem. They are attracted by yeast and gluthionine “smell”. Powdered food and bacter ae and shrimp fit due to yeast content will cause over proliferation. They are harmless if proper maintenance is consistent. I have them in all my shrimp tanks and I give shrimp away by the dozen to control the shrimp population.  Hope that helps. Forgive me if I misspelled some names. 

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I watch mine. If I have fry in my tank and feed then they grow and multiply so I vacuum very lightly just surface hover to remove excess and they stay right at the gravel line and small enough I cannot see them without a magnifier. A clip on uv for hob or any uv helps control them if they are already too many and the green hydra because the green ones hove a symbiotic relationship with green algae living inside them. I have no scientific idea why I am not a scientist. I added one in the first tank I had them as they were already out of control and it knocked them back to a useful level. Hey anything that eats the bacteria and Protozoa that can prey on my fish is ok in my book. 

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On 5/26/2021 at 2:35 PM, CalmedByFish said:

Situation: 

55 gallon. Lightly planted. 1 angelfish. 3 species of snails (MTS, ramshorn, bladder).

8 days ago, the water was suddenly cloudy. Parameters: Ammonia 0, Nitrite 0, Nitrate 10-30. I kept feeding the angel, but stopped feeding the snails. 

4 days ago, the water was still cloudy, so I also stopped feeding the angel. 

This morning, I woke up to clear water... and the first hydra and hair algae I've ever seen. 

Most of the plants were purchased just days to weeks before the cloudiness started. I assume the hydra and hair algae rode in on them.

I've read/watched the links below, but still have questions. 

The main thing I don't understand is what the hydra is eating. I've never put live foods in the tank, and hadn't fed the tank at all for 4 days before finding the hydra. How is it even alive?

I think I'll be able to ditch the hair algae by figuring out how to balance my light and ferts for the plants. Right?

If you have suggestions for animals to eat hydra or hair algae, I'm game to research them. (Take into account that the angel is more aggressive than most.)

Thanks for any ideas or insights.

https://www.aquariumcoop.com/blogs/aquarium/hydra

https://www.aquariumcoop.com/blogs/aquarium/aquarium-algae

 

I have 3 Florida Flagfish as a clean up crew for hair algae and they have completely eradicated it from my pond. They can be slightly territorial, but they wouldn’t dare go after an angel. They’re hardy little buggers and the males are very pretty when full grown, and they’re usually okay being by themselves. I would imagine that they might eat the hydra, as well, since they really aren’t picky eaters.

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I had a hydra problem in my tank so I got this stuff called No Planeria that did the trick for me. I am pretty sure it is NOT snail safe, though, so probably doesn't hurt to do some additional reading into the product before purchasing. 

As others have said, there are some fish that do the trick also. My thick lipped gourami appear to keep the hydra in check in their tank.

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