Jump to content

Shubunkins?


Dawn T
 Share

Recommended Posts

I've been thinking about a small outdoor pond setup, but I don't want any fish that get massive (like comet goldfish or koi). Neither do I really want small fish like rosy red minnows or even smaller than that. I'm not a fan of most of the fancy goldish. Their body shapes and mutations just don't appeal. But I ran across shubunkins, and I love the way they look. The web, of course, has articles that totally contradict each other on everything about them, so I thought I'd ask about them here.

Does anyone have this particular type of goldfish?

Do they truly stay smaller than comets, without being really small? I read 8" and thereabouts on some sites, which would be perfect, I think, for the type of setup I want to do. I also found sites that said they get HUGE (16") and some that said they stay smaller (4-6"). Talk about huge variation. *sigh*

Do you have them outside? Do they do well in a pond setting? Or are they better for an indoor aquarium?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Shubunkins are pretty much the same as comets but the colors are different, comets stay smaller then commons, but Shubunkin and Comets get about the same size. If you are looking to do an outdoor pond with goldfish that stay smaller, I highly recommend Ranchu or fantails, both will stay about 6 inches and both are cold tolerant, Ranchus can over winter easy just the same as comets and commons. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Dawn T said:

I haven't put one in yet. In the planning phase, but looking at either 150 or 300 gallon. I don't want to put the wrong fish in there, but getting straight, reliable answers online reading websites and blogs seems like a crapshoot sometimes.

Thats more than enough for a few goldfish. Now it depend on how you plan to filter it

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why is it that I hear that fancies are more delicate because their organs are compacted?  I have read that their life expectancy isn’t as long and that sustained temps below 60 degrees can suppress their immune system more than their single tailed relatives?  I am just trying to understand it all because my fancies seemed to struggle at 50 degrees with a few things this winter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...