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Is driftwood hard to keep in aquarium?


Bigdog99
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Gotta 10 gallon, it just finished cycling, my next step was fish…..but I haven’t got them yet. So I have seen spider wood and other types of driftwood if there are “different” types of driftwood. So, heard that it it can be hard to keep. This is obviously not a live plant or fish but any recommendations as I have a 10 gallon freshwater aquarium as some of you know and getting some white cloud minnows.bonus Q: can I add 6 WCMMs to the tank? I pretty much have to because they can get stressed if not I heard. I will make mistakes but being cautious since this tank was more expensive than u might think for all that goes into it. Prob spent 250+ dollars and I want to have decent aquarium. Thanks in advance! 🙂 ps: that is why I am asking sooo many Qs! 😂

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Questions are great. Oh, there are lots of kinds of driftwood. Spiderwood is one. Relatively easy to work with. I built a mopani wood arch for my angelfish. I like mopani. Easy to work with but it will turn your water brown like tea. I actually like the look. My wife. Not so much. Some driftwood likes to float and takes anchoring down rocks. Or soaked in water before placing. Small pieces can be boiled to make sure it’s safe. Lots of way to go with wood. Many different types all depending on where they’re from and what they look like

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As mentioned already the only real thing to note with wood is the brown water and the floating my Malaysian driftwood is still giving off tannins like 10 years later I personally don’t mind but some people like completely clean water and some can float for months I have one piece that takes about 3 months to sink other than that it can get mould when you first get it it’s completely harmless(lots of fish eat it)but can be a bit ugly it goes away after a while it can also deteriorate a bit and you get little bits of wood on the substrate they can be vacuumed up not a bad problem overall it’s just a piece of wood in water and I really like the way it looks 

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The mold kind of looks like a white clear, goo. Lots of driftwood will do that. Not harmful. Bit unsightly. You have to give it some time to clear. It’s just bacteria eating away what it can eat. If it’s not done and you clean it by siphoning or brushing it off. It’s going to come back. When the food source starts to run out on the wood. Then you can clean it and it never comes back 

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On 2/3/2024 at 3:34 PM, lefty o said:

driftwood is not hard to keep. you cant over feed it, cant give it too much light, and it doesnt care about water parameters.

Yes I was mainly concerned of the tea looking water. I don’t like it. Is there some that don’t make water brown? @lefty o

On 2/3/2024 at 7:00 PM, Tony s said:

The mold kind of looks like a white clear, goo. Lots of driftwood will do that. Not harmful. Bit unsightly. You have to give it some time to clear. It’s just bacteria eating away what it can eat. If it’s not done and you clean it by siphoning or brushing it off. It’s going to come back. When the food source starts to run out on the wood. Then you can clean it and it never comes back 

Ok thanks!! 

On 2/3/2024 at 6:10 PM, face said:

As mentioned already the only real thing to note with wood is the brown water and the floating my Malaysian driftwood is still giving off tannins like 10 years later I personally don’t mind but some people like completely clean water and some can float for months I have one piece that takes about 3 months to sink other than that it can get mould when you first get it it’s completely harmless(lots of fish eat it)but can be a bit ugly it goes away after a while it can also deteriorate a bit and you get little bits of wood on the substrate they can be vacuumed up not a bad problem overall it’s just a piece of wood in water and I really like the way it looks 

Thanks. Sorry for late responses. 

On 2/3/2024 at 3:07 PM, Tony s said:

Questions are great. Oh, there are lots of kinds of driftwood. Spiderwood is one. Relatively easy to work with. I built a mopani wood arch for my angelfish. I like mopani. Easy to work with but it will turn your water brown like tea. I actually like the look. My wife. Not so much. Some driftwood likes to float and takes anchoring down rocks. Or soaked in water before placing. Small pieces can be boiled to make sure it’s safe. Lots of way to go with wood. Many different types all depending on where they’re from and what they look like

😂. I have seen spider wood but wasn’t sure of it.

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On 2/3/2024 at 7:40 PM, Bigdog99 said:

Yes I was mainly concerned of the tea looking water. I don’t like it. Is there some that don’t make water brown? @lefty o

Ok thanks!! 

Thanks. Sorry for late responses. 

😂. I have seen spider wood but wasn’t sure of it.

spiderwood is the best bet for not turning the water colors.

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On 2/3/2024 at 8:40 PM, Bigdog99 said:

Yes I was mainly concerned of the tea looking water. I don’t like it. Is there some that don’t make water brown? @lefty o

Ok thanks!! 

Thanks. Sorry for late responses. 

I personally have dead oak tree limbs and small stump in one of my aquariums. I collected this from my backyard. The backyard is part of a Metro Park. I've collected dead Oak leaves also for the aquarium. I definitely recommend aquascaping native setups with the leaves and wood. 

Here is a pic with a small stump and a few oak leaves. https://photos.app.goo.gl/TCDUjWRuCaWbpg2m7

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On 2/3/2024 at 9:00 PM, lefty o said:

spiderwood is the best bet for not turning the water colors.

Thanks. I will get this very soon. @lefty o

On 2/3/2024 at 9:23 PM, Miranda Marie said:

I agree. Spiderwood barely adds any brown tint to the water, if at all. It's also well suited to small tanks like a 10 gallon. 

Yes I have noticed how small it is at petsmart! @Miranda Marie

On 2/3/2024 at 9:28 PM, Tlindsey said:

I personally have dead oak tree limbs and small stump in one of my aquariums. I collected this from my backyard. The backyard is part of a Metro Park. I've collected dead Oak leaves also for the aquarium. I definitely recommend aquascaping native setups with the leaves and wood. 

Here is a pic with a small stump and a few oak leaves. https://photos.app.goo.gl/TCDUjWRuCaWbpg2m7

Thanks for the info @Tlindsey!

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On 2/3/2024 at 9:42 PM, Tlindsey said:

Not all but leaves from hardwood trees like Oak, and Maple are safe imo. Just make sure you collect them from areas that don't get fertilized.

You can boil the leaves to rid some of the tannins if you like.

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On 2/3/2024 at 9:58 PM, face said:

If you put leaves in you aquarium they will add tannins and make sure they’re completely brown and dry if there still green they will rot 

@face I should have stated dry dead leaves. I wait until fall here in Ohio before I collect them. 

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