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WILD CAUGHT: AQUARIUM FISH TRADE OF THE AMAZON


Mjb24
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Freshwater Exotics, one of the sponsors of the video, have some really good videos of collecting in the wild in Brazil. On one of their discus collecting trips I was surprised to find so many pikes in with the discus. They're not a fish I'd think to combine with discus but there they were in nature living side by side. I'm not sure how that would translate to tank life but it was interesting to see in the wild. They also went collecting once at a low water time and the number of pleco caves in a now exposed mud riverbank was impressive to see. The riverbank looked like a pegboard with all of the holes in it. It's pretty impressive seeing where the fish come from and how they get here from there.

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On 9/8/2021 at 9:07 AM, gardenman said:

On one of their discus collecting trips I was surprised to find so many pikes in with the discus. They're not a fish I'd think to combine with discus but there they were in nature living side by side.

In the Amazon a lot of species are living together, from very big (Arapaima for example) to some of the smallest Rasbora's and Tetra's. Keep in mind that the river basin is mixed with tons of debris and the water is dark, so natural broken lines of sight are constantly available. Even though the water is dark with tannins it's still clear, it's just the distance you're able to see is limited. 

 

On 9/8/2021 at 9:07 AM, gardenman said:

I'm not sure how that would translate to tank life but it was interesting to see in the wild.

Dwarf Pike Cichlids could most likely be kept with Discus in larger aquaria with little repercussions, but unlike the Amazon space in the aquarium is finite, so you'd have to start off with a tank that's significant in size. On top of that, tons of driftwood and plants would be required for the broken lines of sight as most people are not going to want to have a tannin heavy environment so they can see all aspects of the tank. 

 

On 9/8/2021 at 9:07 AM, gardenman said:

They also went collecting once at a low water time and the number of pleco caves in a now exposed mud riverbank was impressive to see. The riverbank looked like a pegboard with all of the holes in it. It's pretty impressive seeing where the fish come from and how they get here from there.

Burrowing species of pleco are actually causing tons of erosion. Between pleco species population growth and the deforestation in the Amazon some banks are constantly just eroding away.

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