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PH Problems


RobHart28
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Looking for some advice on a more permanent solution to high Ph. Currently I'm read on the above 8 range using the master test kit. I want to bring that down to the 7's without using driftwood or anything that darkens the water. Looked into RO Filters but that seems to knock the ph down to the bottom end and softening the water at the same time requiring me to fight that too. Where is the balance!!! I live in Jefferson City Missouri so anybody from my area managing their ph I'd appreciate any advice. Thanks!

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I presume you measure tap ph (if not please provide more information). A ph of 8 or 8.2 is not the end of the world for many species of fishes. While it might not be their native ph they can adapt to a higher ph if slowly introduced. Conversely the way many people use RO water for fresh water is they mix it with tap - so depending on your hardness (I suspect you have hard water) you might mix 2 part ro water with 2 part tap water and then use that for your aquarium. 

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Naturally using tap has a lot of advantages. Most fishes are more sensitive to change than actual parameter. That is using water that is adjusted and then adding water that is not adjusted to the same values can 'shock' the fish with can lead to disease and death. Of course these are generalities and specifics come into play depending on actual values and actual species of fish. One thing for sure is you want to aim for tank bred fishes as wild fishes are going to be a lot more sensitive to hard alkaline water. Conversely you might go with african fishes that actually prefer hard alkaline water.

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If the tank is pushing the pH up or pulling it down, each water change to compensate will be a disturbance, but if the tank is largely inert (not trying to raise or lower pH) the water change water could be conditioned to fit. If you water change by the bucket, a predetermined amount of a suitable acid could be added. This is just armchair reasoning though.

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I measured ph from my first aquarium and it read in the 8's. Didn't test the tap water itself (brain fart) I'll do that when I get home. Haven't tested water hardness yet either need to get the strips. We've been losing fish in the first tank so trying to troubleshoot why.

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6 minutes ago, RobHart28 said:

I measured ph from my first aquarium and it read in the 8's. Didn't test the tap water itself (brain fart) I'll do that when I get home. Haven't tested water hardness yet either need to get the strips. We've been losing fish in the first tank so trying to troubleshoot why.

If the tank ph does not match tap ph then perhaps describe what is in the tank. There are substrates for example designed for african fishes that will make the water harder and more alkaline also some rocks will leach. 'cept in special cases (salt water and africans are example) it is best to largely use inert items - the exception to this are wood and live plants. There are a lot of benefits to tanis leached by wood for many (not all) species of commonly kept fishes as well as decay introduce by plants. 

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I'll test the tap water itself and get back to you if there is a difference. Still doing research and learning much since starting the first tank. Setting up a 60 gallon with live plants soon and want to get water sorted before adding fish. 

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