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Nirvanaquatics

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Everything posted by Nirvanaquatics

  1. Hey everyone, long time no post! We are kind of short-staffed at the store right now, so I've been working a lot and haven't had much free time to hang out here. As a side note, if you're interested in working at a fish store and you're near Plano, TX, let me know 😉 If you've got egg crate kicking around like I normally do, this test kit rack will probably cost you nothing. I did put some clear mylar on the bottom to keep the tubes from falling out, but you could just as easily just put another piece of egg crate offset under the bottom panel. Everything is just stuck together with super glue and I cut the egg crate with wire cutters. I'll eventually put a handle on it or something to make it easier to carry, but it's not that difficult to pick it up by the sides, either. Feel free to use, improve upon, and mix up this idea. Hopefully it helps someone out!
  2. Eh if you don't already have some kicking around, don't bother buying bottled bacteria. The used tank water will probably do roughly the same thing. Scrape the glass in an established tank and you'll get plenty of bacterial starter lol. As for the amount of water, you could do 2/3rds for sure.
  3. If you have a cycled tank, remove some water from your 5 gallon (maybe 2 gallons or so) and add some water from an established aquarium and see if that helps. Honestly 5ppm ammonia is a lot for initial cycle. I usually recommend aiming for 2ppm because ammonia higher than that can actually stall the bacterial growth.
  4. Like a couple inches long and mostly flat. I don't know a ton about them, but I've seen them before in other people's tanks and they are known to be great algae eaters 😊
  5. The test shows at least 80ppm nitrates, though.
  6. Probably low oxygen if its after a water change, then. Could also just be the change in general that did it, sometimes you can shock their system if they were weakened by high nitrates. I would think that you would have seen a change in your fish, too, though.
  7. Mine go to the top when there's an ammonia spike or not enough oxygen... Might want to check your water just in case.
  8. I'd still like to see a peer-reviewed article supporting your claims, because if I'm wrong I want to know about it. However, I have been searching for a good while at this point and can find absolutely nothing about ammonia binders being harmful during an initial cycle. I did find a thread from another forum basically stating that this is simply false info that's been circulated by word of mouth.
  9. Right, but if it saves a fish from ammonia poisoning - temporarily - why would you discourage it? If it won't crash the cycle (even if it prolongs the process a bit) I don't see the harm in taking precautions.
  10. I would like to see actual evidence to contribute to the idea that the ammonia is unavailable to bacteria, because I do not believe that is the case. Prime converts ammonia to ammonium, which nitrosoma can still metabolize.
  11. It doesn't take much to hatch mystery snails. Here's a great instructional article about it 😊
  12. Using prime to detoxify ammonia temporarily removes stress from fish and allows the bacteria to handle the ammonia before the prime wears off. I don't understand why you would discourage someone from making the water safe for their livestock during an ammonia spike, even a mild one.
  13. Lower light or more water changes, however your AR is likely stretching because it's not getting enough light. AR also takes a ridiculously long time to get established and it definitely needs root tabs or a nutrient rich substrate. If it's been in your tank less than 3 weeks, just be patient and let it whine and cry about being moved. It'll snap out of it and look pretty eventually.
  14. Dose some prime to detoxify and leave it alone. Your bacteria will take it from there 😊
  15. He looks like my veiltail boy! He has the same blue flash over his gold parts. Absolutely beautiful.
  16. Probably just blackout until it dies and the shrimp eat it.
  17. Thankfully my store usually only orders enough to put into actual tanks, but we ended up with 4 in overstock for a little while and Jack was one of them. We rarely lose bettas due to cups, so I wasn’t going to let him be one of the few.
  18. Wow that is one stunning fish! I don’t think I’ve ever seen one like him, either.
  19. Flagfish eat hair algae like crazy, and every other kind of algae, too. Females are peaceful, males are aggressive, so make sure you get a female. Look for the black spot on the back of the dorsal fin, males will have a mostly red dorsal with no spot. Hair algae likes to keep coming back, so getting a fish that likes to eat it is incredibly helpful. I have a team of female flagfish that I regularly use to clean up extra stubborn types of algae. They'll even eat staghorn!
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