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Is snipping leaves off new crypts is a myth?


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Took some advice from someone and I have tried this on several crypts (regrettably on some pink flamingo as well🙃). 

The wendtii brown I have has begun to grow back but the leaves look stunted and small. Looks like a tissue culture now lol. I have been supplementing with root tabs. Still, growth is very slow. Pink flamingos have barely grown back after a month. On the other hand, I have a Wendtii that I put in without snipping and it has been thriving. Granted, this seemed to have been in its submersed state when I bought it. 

wondering if I should refrain from doing this.

Edited by SupersoNick95
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Upon first planting? That would be a myth. I’ve heard about doing this to other plants grown out of water. But not with crypts. I’ve tried it on other plants, haven’t seen much of a difference. Even if they melt back to form true underwater leaves 

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On 2/1/2024 at 3:33 PM, SupersoNick95 said:

wondering if I should refrain from doing this.

Who knows. My experience with crypts gives me little to judge by.

 

I initially bought 3 Pink Flamingo crypts from the co op and placed 1 each in 3 different tanks.  Two looked to be heathy enough the third looked rather week with minimal root.

 

1 healthy one melted away within a few weeks or so never to rise again.  The other healthy looking one just stagnated there for like 9 months running in place… a new leaf popped up,  an old leaf melted, another new leaf, two more melted… just pitiful…

 

the weakest looking one melted to nothing and then the roots strated sending out new leaves and in a couple months time it was spreading all over and over powering the tank….

All three tanks have aquasoil supplement near plants, weekly water changes, front loading water column ferts, and strong co2….

 

 I harvested some bits of the best one and planted it in a new low tech tank and all of the leVes promptly melted away, but the roots are shooting up thriving new leaves..  I also bought a crypt Wendetti red and lutea and planted those in the low tech tank that also melted away quickly.  And are growing new leaves nicely…

 

IMG_1972.jpeg.d34f6fcf6a846aaae418b76bac3df8df.jpegimage.jpeg.9aea3ce7c891c0b0a0c8826b2c44c698.jpeg

Edited by Pepere
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On 2/1/2024 at 12:46 PM, Pepere said:

Who knows. My experience with crypts gives me little to judge by.

Can I ask an unrelated question? Have you found it difficult to keep that sandy area from getting mixed with gravel? It looks like it's behaving. Did you do anything special to keep it over there? I was toying with the idea of doing something like that so I could have a place for some cories to play but I wasn't sure how annoying it be to maintain?

Edited by Dria
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Hello! I keep a variety of crypt species in low tech and no matter how they start (emersed, submerged or tissue culture) I never cut the leaves. Usually they take a couple weeks to settle in, but then they start growing new leaves. Some of the old leaves will start to melt and as they do I just snip them off. Everything does fine.

I don't think it is necessary to cut the leaves off but that is just my experience in low tech.

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On 2/1/2024 at 6:05 PM, Dria said:

Can I ask an unrelated question? Have you found it difficult to keep that sandy area from getting mixed with gravel? It looks like it's behaving. Did you do anything special to keep it over there?

It has been about a year and maintenance free.  I have literally done nothing to it. 
 

bear in ind though the gravel is separated from it by essentially a wall of rocks.

 

Idid have another tank I excavated out some gravel and put in sand and that would continually get covered by gravel… so same level would be different than different elevation with a rock wall separating…

Edited by Pepere
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On 2/1/2024 at 3:46 PM, Pepere said:

Who knows. My experience with crypts gives me little to judge by.

 

I initially bought 3 Pink Flamingo crypts from the co op and placed 1 each in 3 different tanks.  Two looked to be heathy enough the third looked rather week with minimal root.

 

1 healthy one melted away within a few weeks or so never to rise again.  The other healthy looking one just stagnated there for like 9 months running in place… a new leaf popped up,  an old leaf melted, another new leaf, two more melted… just pitiful…

 

the weakest looking one melted to nothing and then the roots strated sending out new leaves and in a couple months time it was spreading all over and over powering the tank….

All three tanks have aquasoil supplement near plants, weekly water changes, front loading water column ferts, and strong co2….

 

 I harvested some bits of the best one and planted it in a new low tech tank and all of the leVes promptly melted away, but the roots are shooting up thriving new leaves..  I also bought a crypt Wendetti red and lutea and planted those in the low tech tank that also melted away quickly.  And are growing new leaves nicely…

 

IMG_1972.jpeg.d34f6fcf6a846aaae418b76bac3df8df.jpegimage.jpeg.9aea3ce7c891c0b0a0c8826b2c44c698.jpeg

Love your glow fish. they get such a bad rap in places through no fault of their own. 

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On 2/1/2024 at 7:48 PM, Tony s said:

Love your glow fish. they get such a bad rap in places through no fault of their own. 
 

I kind of like them.  Primarily I got them for my two nearly 5 year old grandsons.  The tank is at floor level in the bedroom where they play on the floor.  

I kind of like them, though primarily , I got them for my two nearly 5 year old grandsons.  The tank is 4 inches above floor level so they can enjoy it while they play with my early 1970s Lesney Matchbox cars and Tonka Trucks…

And since it is a tank for them I also have 2 Paw Patrol character  ornaments in the tank and I have a black light I can turn on fir them along with a setting on my finnex planted plus of a blue green mix that makes them really pop…

 

I drew the line against glo decor and gaudy fake Glo plants, and Glo substrate…

 

image.jpg.7fc2fd1f4385a195e72bea6db2e9746e.jpg

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I made my wife and daughter one, with a few glo decorations. 36 gallon, painted black with blue lights. they really are very cool looking and tough little fish.

I love the natural look of your tank

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I think its a conspiracy from the big plant distributor(s). They pay influencers to promote clipping healthy growth cause it "helps plants grow". But in reality it only helps to increase the companies sales from customers rebuying and repeating this plant killing practice! 🤣

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On 2/2/2024 at 9:11 AM, TMartins said:

@JoeQ i think your on to something…it’s really the Aquatic Plant Industrial Complex controlling the information on the internet 🤣🤣🤣🤣

Big Plant controls the levers 😂😂😂

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I have done this with anubias. The theory is that when you get them in the tubes from big box, they are surface grown. So when you submerge them, they need to switch leaves to submerged versions. Trimming shortens the process. Making it easier on the plant to form the correct leaf. Never seemed to make much difference though. 
never on crypts. Most crypts are converted when you get them and they’re more sensitive and less tough 

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On 2/2/2024 at 9:20 AM, TMartins said:

…also I am not suicidal 😳😳

This has the potential of getting outa hand!!! I Know nothing about that and love our big plant overlords! 

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I'm curious about something.  I've had very good results with crypts, even with pulling them up and moving them to new locations.  I got some tissue culture pink ones that didn't even melt much.  However in my frustrating battle with algae I recently discovered I've got very high phosphate from the groundwater I use.  I wonder if that has influenced the crypt success?     

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On 2/3/2024 at 5:17 AM, reefhugger said:

I'm curious about something.  I've had very good results with crypts, even with pulling them up and moving them to new locations.  I got some tissue culture pink ones that didn't even melt much.  However in my frustrating battle with algae I recently discovered I've got very high phosphate from the groundwater I use.  I wonder if that has influenced the crypt success?     

My tap has high phosphates, so much so I needed to cut wayyyyy back on them in my fertilizer. Yet my crypts are less than impressive. As far as Phosphate and Crypt growth, from personal experience I don't see the connection. There is probably another factor that has more impact. 

 

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I’m wondering if there’s a difference between your two’s ph and gh. That would affect the amount of calcium and magnesium available in your sources. It could also be a difference in the micro elements. Boron, selenium, manganese, sulfur, copper. Loads of variations. Not all harder water is created equal. Around us, we have varying rates of sulfur that can cause issues. And it’s not phosphorus that’s the issue, it’s iron. Okay, possibly phosphorus, haven’t checked that. But mostly iron 

Edited by Tony s
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