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Seachem storage temps


Gideyon
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I've had my fish equipment in the garage ever since I moved in 2022. I've had my API testing kit, seachem prime, and a beneficial bacteria starter in there. 

I know Prime doesn't expire but it's with the caveat that it's stored properly. Anyone know what those temps may be? 

My garage in the last couple of years has ranged from 40 degrees to maybe 80.  It's somewhat sealed so it never reached the extreme temps outside, except for one day we accidentally left the garage open on a freezing night. 

Should I be getting a new bottle?   Same with the testing kit? 

Edited by Gideyon
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If you also have test strips that can test chlorine you can test your water to see if it registers, then add the Prime and wait, and then test again to see if the chlorine is gone. 
 

Personally I would probably just replace them to be on the safe side, and I understand that not everyone has the disposable income and luxury of doing that. 

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I was thinking I may just have to do that. I'm hoping to have everything up and ready by Wednesday as a gift. The testing kit I really didn't want to buy again but I'm doing an in-fish cycle, so I need to keep an eye on it. 

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For an in-fish cycle, I would not trust Prime to "lock up" ammonia.  There isn't much evidence that it does (or doesn't) do that.

Rely on water changes and very light feeding instead (you can use the Prime, but don't rely on it).

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On 2/11/2024 at 5:20 PM, Galabar said:

For an in-fish cycle, I would not trust Prime to "lock up" ammonia.  There isn't much evidence that it does (or doesn't) do that.

Rely on water changes and very light feeding instead (you can use the Prime, but don't rely on it).

I don't.   I just use it for dechlorination. 

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On 2/12/2024 at 2:02 AM, AllFishNoBrakes said:

If you also have test strips that can test chlorine you can test your water to see if it registers, then add the Prime and wait, and then test again to see if the chlorine is gone. 
 

Personally I would probably just replace them to be on the safe side, and I understand that not everyone has the disposable income and luxury of doing that. 

Thanks for the info, I will keep it in my mind.

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