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Amazon Swords Not Growing Well


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@Chris P.One to two inches in the initial two months isn't bad for growth in Amazon swords. Did you trim the roots back some when you first planted them to encourage new root growth? Amazon swords are slow growers, and they sometimes go through a phase of recovery first for a few months. I have a Green Ocelot sword that initially remained almost  the same for about five months, then it started its growth spurt, and I've now had to trim it back repeatedly because it had reached the surface of the tank. I place at least two to three root tabs deep in the substrate around each of my swords to keep them happy and supplied with iron, and potassium.

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2 hours ago, Jungle Fan said:

@Chris P.One to two inches in the initial two months isn't bad for growth in Amazon swords. Did you trim the roots back some when you first planted them to encourage new root growth? Amazon swords are slow growers, and they sometimes go through a phase of recovery first for a few months. I have a Green Ocelot sword that initially remained almost  the same for about five months, then it started its growth spurt, and I've now had to trim it back repeatedly because it had reached the surface of the tank. I place at least two to three root tabs deep in the substrate around each of my swords to keep them happy and supplied with iron, and potassium.

I'm glad to know this. I have a Radican Sword I bought back in February and the whole plant gradually melted, but I never tossed it because I was seeing new leaves still. It's very slowly growing new roots now. I have it carefully barricaded so the cories can't dig it up, and I think I've planted 3 root tabs around it. So I'm pleased to know it has a chance of actually recovering and not remaining its current pitiful self.

 

Meanwhile I swear my Melon Sword grows a new leaf every time I look at the tank. Swords never cease to be interesting.

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@Streetwiseif you want to propagate swords by dividing the original plant it is better to use a sharp knife and cut them in half just once by cutting clean through the middle of the rosette leaving as many healthy leaves untouched as possible, that way the plant has a better chance to recover.

When trimming the roots I would generally go no further than trimming off a third or less, leaving the thicker portions of the roots alone. When dividing the plant in my experience it takes a good while longer to see new growth because the plant recovers very slowly but eventually it does and the plant fills in all the way around, however I have seen it take up to the better portion of a year sometimes. 

Trimming the roots at the time of planting encourages new growth, and better anchoring and plants I have treated that way generally showed better growth than others that I hadn't before I was taught to do so many years ago by a friend who still grows and propagates swords in Germany.

Edited by Jungle Fan
better wording
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