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I have an idea. If you can do a geographically accurate biotope aquarium, why can't you do a historically accurate aquarium. Sort of a historotope if I'm allowed one neologism here.

At an estate sale a while back, I acquired a 1930s era aquarium with a metal frame and a slate bottom. This is not one of those stainless steel MetaFrame aquariums everyone (including me) had back in the 1960s and the 1970s. It is clearly something much older.

Everything about the aquarium was in good shape when I got it, and it was watertight. Last year when I was using it to grow mosquito larva outside I forgot to bring it in when it got cold. When ice formed in the tank the expanding ice blew out one of the glass sides.

So, what might the rules be for a historotope?

Rules:

  1. You are only allowed to use equipment available during your chosen time period.
  2. You are only allowed to keep fishes that were available during your chosen time period.
  3. You must use historically accurate foods.
  4. You must use historically accurate plants.
  5. You must use historically accurate substrate and decorations.
  6. You must use historically accurate maintenance methods.

Since I have the aquarium (once I get it repaired), my chosen time period will be the mid-1930s in the United States. My first step is to get the tank water tight again. I will post more later as this experiment progresses and your thoughts and suggestions come in.

Edited by Daniel
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I have an idea. If you can do a geographically accurate biotope aquarium, why can't you do a historically accurate aquarium. Sort of a historotope if I'm allowed one neologism here. At an estate

That is a great question! Aquarium keeping in the 1930s seems pretty similar to what we do now, with pretty similar results. I won't do anything that isn't good for the fish. I might have to work

Here is the old aquarium: I think the slate on the bottom is almost an inch thick! Late this afternoon I delivered the tank to the Imagination Station Science Center in Wilson NC.

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I am looking forward to watching this progress, I think it will be really cool... but you lost me at historically accurate food and maintenance methods. That sounds like WORK. 🤣

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1 hour ago, Brandy said:

I am looking forward to watching this ... but you lost me at historically accurate food and maintenance methods. That sounds like WORK. 🤣

We are about to find out, I think I once heard @Cory say he thought people fed their fish table scraps back in the 1930s. I’ve got a lot of research to do.

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Sorry about thinking ths in a negative way, but is this ethical? Would you do the same with any other aspect of life in 1930? Medicine? Health care? Child care? Am I correct in assuming that aquariums in 1930 were a worse place for fish/plants than they are today?

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5 hours ago, Daniel said:

I have an idea. If you can do a geographically accurate biotope aquarium, why can't you do a historically accurate aquarium. Sort of a historotope if I'm allowed one neologism here.

At an estate sale a while back, I acquired a 1930s era aquarium with a metal frame and a slate bottom. This is not one of those stainless steel MetaFrame aquariums everyone (including me) had back in the 1960s and the 1970s. It is clearly something much older.

Everything about the aquarium was in good shape when I got it, and it was watertight. Last year when I was using it to grow mosquito larva outside I forgot to bring it in when it got cold. When ice formed in the tank the expanding ice blew out one of the glass sides.

So, what might the rules be for a historotope?

Rules:

  1. You are only allowed to use equipment available during your chosen time period.
  2. You are only allowed to keep fishes that were available during your chosen time period.
  3. You must use historically accurate foods.
  4. You must use historically accurate plants.
  5. You must use historically accurate substrate and decorations.
  6. You must use historically accurate maintenance methods.

Since I have the aquarium (once I get it repaired), my chosen time period will be the mid-1930s in the United States. My first step is to get the tank water tight again. I will post more later as this experiment progresses and your thoughts and suggestions come in.

Daniel,

That is quite an interesting concept.  Personally, I would go for it, as long as, water parameters can be maintained properly and the fish food is acceptable.

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Diego said:

Sorry about thinking ths in a negative way, but is this ethical? Would you do the same with any other aspect of life in 1930? Medicine? Health care? Child care? Am I correct in assuming that aquariums in 1930 were a worse place for fish/plants than they are today?

That is a great question!

Aquarium keeping in the 1930s seems pretty similar to what we do now, with pretty similar results. I won't do anything that isn't good for the fish. I might have to work harder though if I am trying to find live foods for example. And it's possible I won't have to work as hard as there will be fewer gadgets to maintain. From my initial reading of the literature, 1930s aquariums do not seem like they were worse for the fish/plants than now, just managed differently, certainly fewer fish per gallon than we tend to keep now. The living conditions of many economically important animals generally haven't improved since the 1930s. Ask yourself, if you were a chicken or a pig or a cow, for the short time you were alive on the Earth, would you have preferred to have been on a 1930s farm or in a 2020 Industrial production facility? I know it is not that good of an analogy but the point I would like to make is that while many, many things have improved in the last 100 years, some things are remarkably similar, and few things were possibly better a 100 years ago.

I am prepared to end the experiment if I have to make compromises that would cause the fish to suffer, but let's find out together what it was like to keep a planted tropical fish tank in the early years of the Great Depression.

And this vintage magazine just came in the mail today. Here is the cover for the August 1934 issue of Home and Gardens magazine. I think this will give me something to shoot for as I set up the tank.

BetterHomes.png.3de9650dd721316f5a4698d1f2afaf1e.png

 

Edited by Daniel
am prepared
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Wow. I’m jealous of your antique aquarium and that magazine cover is gorgeous... I might have to find my own copy!

This concept is so interesting. Can’t wait to see what happens!

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Ebay for $12. Seems like a pretty good value. The stories inside the magazine are mind bending. A whole, whole lot has changed socially since the 1930s for the better. But those fish! Healthy angels, beautiful red swordtails, and what a nice little school of zebra danios with vallisneria growing in the background! 

I looked up the artist for that cover art in the above post. His name Arthur C. Bade. After Better Homes and Gardens, he was a staff artist for Science and Mechnics. I blame him for me thinking I would have a flying car by now!

tomorrowland.PNG.b38352b2f8c1fddee63f09b191fd8577.PNG

Edited by Daniel
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1 hour ago, Daniel said:

Ebay for $12. Seems like a pretty good value. The stories inside the magazine are mind bending. A whole, whole lot has changed socially since the 1930s for the better. But those fish! Healthy angels, beautiful red swordtails, and what a nice little school of zebra danios with vallisneria growing in the background! 

I looked up the artist for that cover art in the above post. His name Arthur C. Bade. After Better Homes and Gardens, he was a staff artist for Science and Mechnics. I blame him for me thinking I would have flying car by now!

tomorrowland.PNG.b38352b2f8c1fddee63f09b191fd8577.PNG

"Technology", in general, can only move as fast as the human minds that create it.  

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Here is the old aquarium:

20200727_2689.JPG.92f0bb68141b730aebe0a445caada7bf.JPG

I think the slate on the bottom is almost an inch thick!

20200727_2693.JPG.a8378e70df7d59497a6f7414a1c20e79.JPG

Late this afternoon I delivered the tank to the Imagination Station Science Center in Wilson NC. They have a restoration person on staff that specialized in restoring old windows and glass.

20200727_2698.JPG.90f2a8c904d2c0e91fe3625e7a51722e.JPG

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So now that I have restricted myself to 'historically accurate' for the 1930s, I need to define what that will mean.

For this project the guide to 'historically accurate' will be the text of "The Complete Aquarium Handbook" which is available to download (it is in the public domain now). I will also use "The Aquarium" magazine issues from the early to mid 1930s as both magazine and the book were published by William T. Innes who was sort of the @Cory of his day. The neon tetra is named after Innes, Paracheirodon innesi. Think of this book as the Innes website and the magazine as the Innes YouTube channel (only it is 1936)!

Cover of 1936 edition of "The Complete Aquarium Book"

920940173_BookCover.jpg.5bfd9344903e108a84047d8f85f509e0.jpg

May 1945 issue of "The Aquarium" magazine (with loads of references to Hitler in the advertisements)

Magazine.jpg.1cfc6ce23024845fffccb83326f001d8.jpg

If I don't follow the rules, you can hold me to account as the link to the book download above will get you the entire 1936 edition of the book, color plates and all.

Edited by Daniel
Update links to Innes' Wiki page, and the neon tetra page which is named for Innes
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4 minutes ago, Daniel said:

So now that I have restricted myself to 'historically accurate' for the 1930s, I need to define what that will mean.

For this project the guide to 'historically accurate' will be the text of "The Complete Aquarium Handbook" which is available to download (it is in the public domain now). I will also use "The Aquarium" magazine issues from the early to mid 1930s as both magazine and the book were publish by William T. Innes who was sort of the @Cory of his day. Think of this book as the Innes website and the magazine as the Innes YouTube channel (only it is 1936)!

Cover of 1936 edition of "The Complete Aquarium Book"

920940173_BookCover.jpg.5bfd9344903e108a84047d8f85f509e0.jpg

May 1945 issue of "The Aquarium" magazine (with loads of references to Hitler in the advertisements)

Magazine.jpg.1cfc6ce23024845fffccb83326f001d8.jpg

If I don't follow the rules, you can hold me to account as the link to the book download above will get you the entire 1936 edition of the book, color plates and all.

Looks like a good read.  Old books are a lot of fun.  📖

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57 minutes ago, DaveSamsell said:

Looks like a good read.  Old books are a lot of fun.  📖

It's pretty funny too. Innes gets the same questions that @Cory gets, like 'how many of fish X will fit in my tank', or 'Can White Clouds be bred year round, and how about tank size', or even 'what is the best temperature to hatch brine shrimp'? And his answers are pretty much the same as Cory's. @DaveSamsell did the PDF download of the book work for you?

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4 minutes ago, Daniel said:

It's pretty funny too. Innes gets the same questions that @Cory gets, like 'how many of fish X will fit in my tank', or 'Can White Clouds be bred year round, and how about tank size', or even 'what is the best temperature to hatch brine shrimp'? And his answers are pretty much the same as Cory's. @DaveSamsell did the PDF download of the book work for you?

Daniel,

Yes, it downloaded just fine.  Thanks.  😊

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Will you be purchasing an icebox or no frozen food?
Lighting should be interesting. what are your thoughts there? I’m In the NE and that’s tough thinking about heating and lighting. 
Side note.... my son’s school has the 3rd oldest electric fridge and it still works. The mansion is great but was a ton of work to turn into a school. 

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Tre said:

Will you be purchasing an icebox or no frozen food?
Lighting should be interesting. what are your thoughts there?

I hadn't thought about frozen food. Partly because I don't feed any frozen foods now. I do however keep my blackworms in the refrigerator, and I was planning to feed blackworms. There is another method of keeping blackworms in a sink under a drippy faucet that I will have to try.

I had thought about lighting. My plan is to put the tank near a north facing window. In the book starting on page 13, Innes says:

'Light. As above stated, aquatic plants in order to thrive and help purify the water must have good light. When in the sun many of them can be seen releasing a steady stream of fine bubbles. These are almost pure oxygen.

Strong diffused light, with an hour or two of direct sun is approximately ideal. Ordinary artificial light is worthless so far as any effect on the plants is concerned.

Direct sun in the summer months is dangerous to small aquaria, as it is liable to raise the temperature too high for the fishes.'

Here is a picture from "The Aquarium" magazine that I think illustrates indirect light.

2045555872_MacyAquarium.png.033b3af36a80fa011340135ff4eddfc3.png

He doesn't call it 'pearling' but it clearly he appreciates the plants 'releasing a steady stream of fine bubbles. These are almost pure oxygen.' Cool, even in 1936 pearling was a thing.

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Historically accurate spousal bargaining

The deal so far has been something like it's okay to put trash cans out in the yard full of mosquitoes, and keep worms in the refrigerator, but all the fish tanks must be confined to my room (the science room).

That creates a problem for my 1930s style aquarium. I need a window to solve the lighting problem. I started dropping hints about this yesterday. This morning she offered me a deal.

20200729_2771.JPG.7778eb55cf70026150afb559d6b509c3.JPG

If I were to get all of my junk out of the spare bedroom so that it was clean and she could use it as her room (the exercise room), then I could use the window in the breakfast nook to set up my 1930s style aquarium.

20200729_2773.JPG.4e2d41a4b043e126a8c61e9bb98b155d.JPG

I took the deal.

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On 7/28/2020 at 8:27 AM, Daniel said:

So now that I have restricted myself to 'historically accurate' for the 1930s, I need to define what that will mean.

For this project the guide to 'historically accurate' will be the text of "The Complete Aquarium Handbook" which is available to download (it is in the public domain now). I will also use "The Aquarium" magazine issues from the early to mid 1930s as both magazine and the book were published by William T. Innes who was sort of the @Cory of his day. The neon tetra is named after Innes, Paracheirodon innesi. Think of this book as the Innes website and the magazine as the Innes YouTube channel (only it is 1936)!

Cover of 1936 edition of "The Complete Aquarium Book"

920940173_BookCover.jpg.5bfd9344903e108a84047d8f85f509e0.jpg

May 1945 issue of "The Aquarium" magazine (with loads of references to Hitler in the advertisements)

Magazine.jpg.1cfc6ce23024845fffccb83326f001d8.jpg

If I don't follow the rules, you can hold me to account as the link to the book download above will get you the entire 1936 edition of the book, color plates and all.

This is really interesting! I love the look of old aquarium handbooks and magazines, would be nice to get some for the bookshelf or just to flip through! Did you get most of the hard copies from eBay? 

On 7/27/2020 at 1:46 PM, Cory said:

I know at one point to add calcium they added milk to the aquarium. 

This blows my mind, I would really like to know more about this. Especially if there are other weird methods that were commonly accepted back then but would turn heads today! Lol

 

 

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5 minutes ago, Byte said:

Did you get most of the hard copies from eBay? 

 

Yes, mostly from eBay, some from ABE Books, but the first old magazines I ever acquired were like 25 cents a piece at a club auction. And as you read through the book, you will see that mostly the methods aren't weird. Plants need light, fish need healthy water and good food. You had to be a little more resourceful back in the day, but what it took to keep happy fish is the same as now.

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@Daniel

I have 2x 1936 Aquarium magazines and 1x 1934 Aquarium magazine I am more than happy to scan to you if you would like. One is the 1936 Tetra issue in which it talks about how Neon Tetras are an amazing new discovery and is sure to become a huge hit in the hobby. They even discuss how hard they are to breed and how they will likely hold their value at $150.00 a pair, imported. LOL! Oh, how times have changed. 🙂

I have the 1931 edition of Innes' book. Not too much changed from 1917 (the original) to my version. Have you noticed any interesting new fish additions between the public domain original and your version yet?

Edited by J. Mantooth
can't math late at night
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That is so cool that you have the 1936 Tetra issue! And yes, I would very much like to see what is in that issue. If you are willing please upload to here.

Does Innes mention how the first neons were originally imported in to the United States from Germany on the airship Hindenburg?

Apistogramma, Corydoras, and Elassoma (pygmy sunfish) are mentioned in the 1936 book that I uploaded, but no mention of discus. I haven't seen earlier versions of the book so I don't know what is new for 1936.

Is your 1931 version the book 'Goldfish Varieties and Tropical Aquarium Fishes' or the 'The Complete Aquarium Book'?

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On 7/27/2020 at 1:55 PM, Diego said:

Sorry about thinking ths in a negative way, but is this ethical? Would you do the same with any other aspect of life in 1930? Medicine? Health care? Child care? Am I correct in assuming that aquariums in 1930 were a worse place for fish/plants than they are today?

I have been thinking about what are the limits (for example, my home is heated and cooled, is this historically accurate) and I have found a line I am not willing to cross. 

WardleyBurger.PNG.110334bf84aa165f5f0ea2babddea346.PNG

You can still buy this at Eric Bodrock's AllOddballAquatics website.

 

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Wardley? Not now, not then, not ever!

(Thank you for linking that website, I’m seriously considering buying some of those vintage backgrounds...)

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12 hours ago, J. Mantooth said:

@Daniel

I have 2x 1936 Aquarium magazines and 1x 1934 Aquarium magazine I am more than happy to scan to you if you would like. One is the 1936 Tetra issue in which it talks about how Neon Tetras are an amazing new discovery and is sure to become a huge hit in the hobby. They even discuss how hard they are to breed and how they will likely hold their value at $150.00 a pair, imported. LOL! Oh, how times have changed. 🙂

@J. Mantooth A few minutes ago I just scored the first 3 years of "The Aquarium" at an live online auction (there was real floor bidding and all):

TheAquarium.PNG.874c156e91c97d5bb6dcabe414f80d29.PNG

I would still love to see what's in the 1936 Tetra Issue. The introduction of neons in 1936 caused a frenzy!

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7 hours ago, Daniel said:

That is so cool that you have the 1936 Tetra issue! And yes, I would very much like to see what is in that issue. If you are willing please upload to here.

Does Innes mention how the first neons were originally imported in to the United States from Germany on the airship Hindenburg?

Apistogramma, Corydoras, and Elassoma (pygmy sunfish) are mentioned in the 1936 book that I uploaded, but no mention of discus. I haven't seen earlier versions of the book so I don't know what is new for 1936.

Is your 1931 version the book 'Goldfish Varieties and Tropical Aquarium Fishes' or the 'The Complete Aquarium Book'?

I will absolutely scan it this afternoon and upload it for you. 🙂 

He absolutely talks about the import in that issue. It is quite a long article and is packed with really cool information about the import process.

I have the electronic version of the original 1917 book, thanks to Cornell University and public domain, so I will load it up for you too. 

I have the Goldfish Varieties and Tropical Aquarium Fishes book. I have a thing for Goldfish, so I went with that one. Really interesting to see the color photos. Really high quality for the time. 

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Just now, J. Mantooth said:

I have the Goldfish Varieties and Tropical Aquarium Fishes book. I have a thing for Goldfish, so I went with that one. Really interesting to see the color photos. Really high quality for the time. 

Innes totally reminds me of @Cory. Very much quality oriented, if he thought the photograph of the fish didn't reflect real life, he would make a painting of what the fish really looked like. Also like @Cory a very wide knowledge base, and very patient in answering questions. And both have/had media empires.

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6 minutes ago, Daniel said:

@J. Mantooth A few minutes ago I just scored the first 3 years of "The Aquarium" at an live online auction (there was real floor bidding and all):

I would still love to see what's in the 1936 Tetra Issue. The introduction of neons in 1936 caused a frenzy!

How awesome!!! What a great win! That is going to be so helpful for your project. 

I will break out the good scanner this afternoon and load it up for you. 🙂

8 minutes ago, Daniel said:

Innes totally reminds me of @Cory. Very much quality oriented, if he thought the photograph of the fish didn't reflect real life, he would make a painting of what the fish really looked like. Also like @Cory a very wide knowledge base, and very patient in answering questions. And both have/had media empires.

I agree. Innes' attention to detail really denotes his passion for aquatics. I appreciate the way he dispels rumors and bad fish keeping advice in his books/articles. He almost sounds like a caring father 'tsking you into doing the right thing for your fish. Like @Cory explaining to someone that water changes really are important, how one should really test their water, and no, you can't put a Goldfish in a bowl. LOL!

I was also really impressed by how many of the "rules" for good fish keeping that are still very much considered sound advice today. Some almost verbatim. It seems like more of the equipment and technology has changed, rather than the basic principals. Though looking at the technology used in the 30's, I am really surprised more people weren't electrocuted using some of those heaters and air pumps. "Can be used with AC and DC current." Makes me glad to be keeping fish today.

 
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Posted (edited)

Many thanks to @J. Mantooth for locating, scanning, and then uploading to our forum the November 1936 issue of “The Aquarium” magazine.

The November 1936 issue of “The Aquarium” magazine highlights three fish that are stalwarts of today's hobby. On the cover is the all-time favorite neon tetra and inside there are articles on both Japanese Rice Fish, and Oscars.

NeonTetra.PNG.3961162b06bab8e6dca19fc6719c842c.PNG

The first imports of neon tetras into United States in the spring of 1936 were flown directly from Hamburg Germany to Lakehurst New Jersey aboard the very last flight of the airship Hindenburg (its next flight ended in a fiery catastrophe while trying to dock at Lakehurst). Interestingly, the pattern set by that first importation would continue even into this day, that is, five of the first six neons died shortly after arriving. If you think it’s disappointing your Petco neons died, imagine paying the equivalent of $10,000 in shipping and just getting one live fish.

Hindenburg.jpg.0f4d0853e6cb53c30092e17d25abc0cf.jpg

That one remaining fish ended up at the Shedd aquarium in Chicago and was referred to by the public as “the last of the Mohicans”.

Eventually, Fred Cochu of Paramount Aquarium purchased the first large shipment of 4000 neons and was able to put them on sale for $10 a piece (big money in 1936).

Paramount.PNG.d0e45b914808a30cf957a0d6aec61a7e.PNG

Fortunately the neons that had passed away still served good scientific use. The expired neons were sent to Dr. George S Myers at the National Museum in Washington DC for examination and he named the fish in honor of William T. Innes, Hyphessobrycon innesi. It would be like a new species puffer being named for @Cory, something like Tetraodon aquariumcoopi.

In 1936 Japanese Rice Fish are referred to as Medakas

1700449059_Ricefish.PNG.307801822b7371d036edeec797e177e4.PNG

The author of the article on Oscars generally refers to them by their scientific name of Astronotus ocellatus. But refers to his pair (which, by way of tribute German Aquarist) as Oscar and Lena. Could this be how they got the name Oscars?

Oscars.PNG.62ac05063e4d536070e1cf0cdd51fba0.PNG

My favorite quote from about Oscars in the article is "God gave too many brains to the cichlids and didn't have enough left over to go around".

Much of the aquarium equipment advertised in the November 1936 issue looks remarkably familiar.

Airpumps.PNG.d5d20c7736dced0014bff5bf8137723c.PNG

Even something that looks a sump or a proto-cannister filter

1984015327_LaughatWinter.PNG.5f5f94f381b609ea90b0685ff8f6dad7.PNG

If you haven't had a chance to download this file, I would highly recommend giving it a try. The advice in the articles holds up even 84 years later and the ads are a lot of fun.

 

 

Cover November1936 The Aquarium.PNG

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5 minutes ago, Brandy said:

The price on the air pump and filter are similar to today's prices! Imagine how impossible that would be to afford then.

In 1936 the average doctor made $3300 per year, the average lawyer $4200, a farm hand made on average $220 a year and a secretary just over $1000 a year. So that air pump, filter combination that cost just under $70 might have been affordable to the average doctor as it was merely a week's wages. But something tells me that that farmhand could never afford to keep an aquarium. I think the best comparison is a nice decked out 1936 freshwater aquarium is the equivalent to today's high-end reef tank. Most people then kept goldfish in an unheated, un-aerated box of water. And even a schoolteacher ($1200/yr) or a dressmaker ($780/yr) could afford to keep goldfish.

On the other hand, in 1936 you could buy a set of four tires for your automobile for $6.35 🙂

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3 minutes ago, Dean’s Fishroom said:

It's kind of interesting how some products have evolved and the basic principles of fish keeping have stayed the same.
 

The laws of biology are kind of immutable like the laws of physics. Air pumps and heaters haven't changed much but lighting has gotten much, much better. Prepared fish food seems to improved quite a bit.

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2 hours ago, Dean’s Fishroom said:

I have a whole pile of these from the 30's through the 50's.
It's kind of interesting how some products have evolved and the basic principles of fish keeping have stayed the same.

 

30s magazines.jpg

How cool that you have so many. I bet between everyone we could get the whole history of fish keeping scanned and uploaded. I like the vintage photos, I bet they were super difficult to get good pictures back then. How do you tell fish not to move for a couple minutes? 

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5 hours ago, Dean’s Fishroom said:

I have a whole pile of these from the 30's through the 50's.
It's kind of interesting how some products have evolved and the basic principles of fish keeping have stayed the same.

 

30s magazines.jpg

I know @Dean’s Fishroom! It was your mention of them that sent me down the rabbit hole to find them, and a wonderful treasure trove of other cool stuff, in the first place. LOL! Thanks Dean! Well, I thank you. My bank account does not. 🙂

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2 hours ago, Edward Steven said:

How cool that you have so many. I bet between everyone we could get the whole history of fish keeping scanned and uploaded. I like the vintage photos, I bet they were super difficult to get good pictures back then. How do you tell fish not to move for a couple minutes? 

I'll say! At least they had graduated to film by the 1930's. Would have been murder, or impossible, with older plate cameras. I think Kodak came out with the Brownie, one of the first real 'portable' cameras in the late teens. @David Humphrey, does that sound accurate to you? Or at least close?

Edited by J. Mantooth
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I'm absolutely loving this as a science nerd.  Biologist and Chemist.  I feel like we're going naked without all of our new contraptions..... like skinny dipping for aquarium hobbyists.  Oh how riskay!  It will also be very interesting to see what plant life you choose.  Balancing plant and fish needs shouldn't be too difficult but I imagine species selection of plants would have been rather limited to the Americas, Europe and common specimens from other regions. This should be a blog from start to finish! Video or written form but would be awesome to see and look over.

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2 minutes ago, Tre said:

This should be a blog from start to finish! Video or written form but would be awesome to see and look over.

I thought about putting this over on the blog, but the traffic in thin over there. I may start putting more of this on the blog as I imagine this is going to take a while, and this thread could get cumbersomely long.

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Just now, Daniel said:

I thought about putting this over on the blog, but the traffic in thin over there. I may start putting more of this on the blog as I imagine this is going to take a while, and this thread could get cumbersomely long.

Yes.  Even photos with a short description of how things are going along.  Then here we can discourse like mad scientists.

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Thanks to Eric Bodrock at All Oddball Aquatics I think the literature search phase of 1930s Historically Accurate Planted Aquarium is drawing to a close. Here are approximately 50 issues of various early 1930s tropical fish magazines Eric just sent.

TheAquarium.png.972b9ee7b52d251d63e57ed0a6f04996.png

I can't wait the read the 'Live Foods Number' and the 'Daphnia Collecting Number'!

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I am starting to make basic choices on the 1930s Historically Accurate Planted Aquarium.

  • Light will mostly come from a window with supplemental light from a 1930s era standing lamp
  • The aquarium will be supported on a board across a 1930s Singer sewing machine wrought iron base

So the placement will look something like this:

20200807_3296.JPG.63a6116aa966577496d1831bf03d5cbc.JPG

No plans to run CO2

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I thought of another simple lighting tool that could have been used in those days: a mirror.

This will be a great project. My folks still have a couple of those sewing machines bases, along with a wooden clothes washer/dryer thing, mostly covered with potted plants.

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