Jump to content

Gourami Sauce


Recommended Posts

I would question having fish directly ingest that volume of salt. I know we use salt in the water for fish. 
Im speaking of the difference in us swimming in the ocean and us dehydrating from drinking ocean water. 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Gourami are a common widespread food fish in countries like Thailand, Lao, Cambodia and Vietnam. 

In your picture is a fermented fish paste kind of like Cambodian prahok or Vietnam po hooc. It's more of a base used for cooking or making side dish dips. Strong smelling, strong tasting, and definitely not safe for feeding to other fish. 

 

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/6/2024 at 9:28 PM, BlueLineAquaticsSC said:

While perusing my local Asian grocery store I found jars of Gourami sauce, only ingredients being blended gourami and salt. Would you consider feeding fish to your fish, maybe mixing with rapashi?

IMG_1991.jpeg
 
I am not gonna buy it. I would like to share the https://www.topessaywriting.org/samples/stealing website with you. If anyone over here is not so good at writing an essay assignment then you can visit the given link to find essay samples. You can read them for free and TopEssayWriting offers a variety of essay samples on the topic of stealing, providing a nuanced examination of this unethical behavior. These essays explore the psychological, social, and economic factors that contribute to stealing, as well as the consequences for individuals and communities. Through real-life examples, legal case studies, and ethical discussions, the samples shed light on the motivations behind stealing and the impact it has on victims and society at large. By presenting diverse perspectives and well-supported arguments, these essays help readers understand the complexities surrounding the act of stealing and the importance of addressing its root causes. TopEssayWriting ensures that each sample is meticulously researched, clearly written, and free from plagiarism, serving as valuable resources for students and researchers alike.

Nope 🙅‍♀️

Edit: Something funny happened, I told my friend not to buy it but he ain't listened to me and bought it and now he regret his decision. haha

Edited by DarlaFrami
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It’s a preserved food for people, so not really suitable for most pets. Kind of like pickles, sauerkraut, kimchi, or beef jerky.

Always blows me away to know people eat blue and snakeskin gouramis, when so many of us keep them ornamentally. But I guess it’s the giant gourami that is mostly used in aquaculture. Makes sense, given that they grow to be 2 feet long! 😮

Edit: does the jar on the left show a feather back knife fish?!

Edited by AtomicSunfish
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/12/2024 at 10:39 AM, AtomicSunfish said:

It’s a preserved food for people, so not really suitable for most pets. Kind of like pickles, sauerkraut, kimchi, or beef jerky.

Always blows me away to know people eat blue and snakeskin gouramis, when so many of us keep them ornamentally. But I guess it’s the giant gourami that is mostly used in aquaculture. Makes sense, given that they grow to be 2 feet long! 😮

Edit: does the jar on the left show a feather back knife fish?!

In a lot of Southeast Asia it's the three spot gourami (Trichopodus trichopterus) that is eaten most. It's plentiful. You can find them all over. They're like bluegills in the US. You can find them bagged up at markets, fermented, etc. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/12/2024 at 10:39 AM, AtomicSunfish said:

Always blows me away to know people eat blue and snakeskin gouramis, when so many of us keep them ornamentally

We had a banker 20 years ago that spent his vacation time in Laos. trying to set up a small swine farm from scratch. His report was that the jungles there were very quiet. If there was something moving there, they would eat it. everything from birds to grubs. including monkeys, everything we would call a pet, all the stuff they could get from a river.  very little refrigeration also. So, all those animals for consumption were either kept alive or sort of fermenting in the jungle heat all day. So, yeah, not surprised at all. makes a lot of sense

Edited by Tony s
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/6/2024 at 11:58 AM, BlueLineAquaticsSC said:

Would you consider feeding fish

If it's made like fish sauce. the runoff off whole fish and salt allowed to ferment until the liquid settles at the bottom. not consumable for fish. Barely consumable by humans. only in small amounts for flavoring

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/12/2024 at 1:38 PM, donnots said:

In a lot of Southeast Asia it's the three spot gourami (Trichopodus trichopterus) that is eaten most. It's plentiful. You can find them all over. They're like bluegills in the US. You can find them bagged up at markets, fermented, etc. 

Yep, that’s another thing that fascinates me; how what’s exotic here is common somewhere else, and vice versa. 😁

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 7/12/2024 at 3:57 PM, Tony s said:

We had a banker 20 years ago that spent his vacation time in Laos. trying to set up a small swine farm from scratch. His report was that the jungles there were very quiet. If there was something moving there, they would eat it. everything from birds to grubs. including monkeys, everything we would call a pet, all the stuff they could get from a river.  very little refrigeration also. So, all those animals for consumption were either kept alive or sort of fermenting in the jungle heat all day. So, yeah, not surprised at all. makes a lot of sense

Lots of stuff they let live, depending on the country. In Cambodia no one will eat turtles or squirrels -- both normal food where I'm from in America. But they will eat rats and spiders, which I've never heard of an American eating. Everyone comes up with their own reasons to eat this or that I guess. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

In Laos where he was at, they had very deep jungle and very little protein to speak of. He was doing illegal missionary work there. Under the guise of agricultural assistance. They made quite a bit of difference for that community. When he retired, I believe they were up to 20 sows. which were capable of producing 200 market animals a year. just unheard of there. including methods of feed production and all the supporting infrastructure. primitive still to be sure, but effective. He goes back now, and it looks like a completely different area. Other interests have kind of moved in and through the surrounding area. Less jungle, more traffic. but the farm is still intact, I believe

On 7/13/2024 at 2:29 PM, donnots said:

both normal food where I'm from in America

Yeah, same here. More rabbits and deer though. Although I did have a class on edible insects at university

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...