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Removing hood/canopy on Fluval premium kit


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Hi everyone,

Few years back when I was first getting into the hobby I bought myself the Fluval Premium LED kit 29g. It's served me very well but in hindsight I would've probably been better served buying myself an Aqueon and doing it myself.

Now comes the question, the whole hood/canopy part of the tank comes off easily and I take it off all the time for maintenance, my impression is it does not really add any structural integrity to the tank as it's it just sits on the glass.

The reason I'm asking is I would like to upgrade my light as this canopy only has a small maybe 6" window that allows light through along with the light itself kind of sucking, can I remove this and add some clips around the glass and get myself a glass top? Has anyone does this before? It's not siliconed in like the Aqueon rims or anything.

Appreciate any input or advice

Thank you!!

Edited by Wadikus
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Right, as this is a kit aquarium, we just want to check our dimensions before we go lid shopping.

1. Does the top black frame have a lip inside? This is a good sign that it can take a standard size aquarium lid like those for Aqueon, (Versa top is the brand), or the like. Clear glass lids are pretty easy to source at Amazon if a LFS or big box doesn't carry them. If it has this lip, measure the dimensions of the lip inside so you know about how wide of a glass lid you need. (Most lids come with a plastic back piece that you can cut to size, so don't worry so much about width if it is long enough). Typically, the glass lid is measured in inches length x width, make sure this matches your lip as closely as you can. Remember that you're measuring so that your lid sits on top of this lip but inside of the frame still.

2. If you have no lip on the frame, instead measure the outside edges of the frame itself, since whatever we're fitting needs to sit on top of that frame rather than inside of it. We're probably looking for a plastic/poly greenhouse roof tile from a big box store or something like this. These are pretty easy to cut down to size with scissors or a utility knife.

Once we have a clear~ish lid for the aquarium picked out and fitted, then you can start looking at plant lights. You really don't want to consider higher end lighting unless your lid is clear enough that it'll benefit from the UV/extra features of the light. If you've got a hazy roof tile arrangement going on, you can get by with some shop lighting from the big box. If you've got clearer greenhouse roof poly or glass, that's where a good light will be able to do its best.

 

 

{EDIT} Okay, you know what? I'm not sure that I'm seeing a top frame here, does all of the black part come completely off of the glass itself? If so, you're looking at a frame-less aquarium. Lids are slightly harder to find, but it might be worth looking around at big boxes, with Amazon as your backup. So, you'd have a glass topper that attached to the glass sides with little plastic hinges or clips. Those do exist, and they're not particularly rare, just not as common as the lids for the framed aquariums.

 

I just completed lid shopping myself for two 40 G breeders I had that were Aqueon Petco specials from the half-off sale. Went with Versatop lids by Aqueon, (ordered off Amazon, fulfilled by Petco). These ended up being about the same price as if I'd just built my own from Home Depot materials after I factored in how much labor and customization I'd need to do. You really just need to know if you have a framed or frameless 29 gallon aquarium and about what size of lid you need to fit said frame or top said frameless. If all else fails, a google search of "Fluval lid for 29 gallon aquarium" will probably point you in the right direction.

Edited by Comradovich
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Thanks for the reply but actually that whole lip lifts right off and it becomes rimless. The 2 seperate pieces are the light hood and then the other giant piece of plastic which is both a rim around the tank and has the flap to flip up and feed.

when you remove both of them nothing remains on top and the big peice of plastic provides zero resistance when sliding it on and off.. so I guess I could get those clips and line the glass and then install an aqeuon glass top?

attached picsimage.jpeg.d8198c0e474e23de8b055588ba9d0a3c.jpegimage.jpeg.b2bb36687523a2ecf90d4c4250b85235.jpeg

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On 6/21/2024 at 6:50 PM, Wadikus said:

Thanks for the reply but actually that whole lip lifts right off and it becomes rimless. The 2 seperate pieces are the light hood and then the other giant piece of plastic which is both a rim around the tank and has the flap to flip up and feed.

when you remove both of them nothing remains on top and the big peice of plastic provides zero resistance when sliding it on and off.. so I guess I could get those clips and line the glass and then install an aqeuon glass top?

attached picsimage.jpeg.d8198c0e474e23de8b055588ba9d0a3c.jpegimage.jpeg.b2bb36687523a2ecf90d4c4250b85235.jpeg

@Comradovich has it pretty well covered, but a quick search for "rimless tank lid bracket" found this one, for example, on Amazon (note I've never used this; it was just the first one that popped up).  Etsy is probably another good source.

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Okay, yeah. That is definitely a rimless tank. I kinda was heading in that direction on the two edits I did, but I don't think I quite got there. @Rube_Goldfish is correct that your lid situation is going to start with those brackets for rimless tanks. Looking on Amazon, a set of those is somewhere in the $8-$18 range. Now, you may be able to use a standard hinged glass lid from Petco/Petsmart with that, you just might need extra brackets for support, (basically meaning you buy 2 kits if you go this route).

Rimless tanks are typically lidded up with a single sheet of tempered glass, to give you that full surround "rimless" effect. I see a few kits on Amazon with clips + glass lid, that might be your best bet. Still measure the inside edges of the tank and see if you can find a lid that will fit. I have been pleasantly surprised this week when Amazon managed to ship me two glass lids without breaking either one of them. So I guess you don't have to be nervous about mail-ordering lids.

Now we can look at lighting. You want a light that is going to perch on top of your rim. Almost everything you look at is going to be adjustable. Look for something like "fits 24"-30" tanks". You really only need to go expensive on these if you've got expensive hard to grow plants. Looks like I can see some java ferns, annubias... maybe some cryptocorynes? All of those are low maintenance plants, you might be able to get away with cheap shop lights from Home Depot on those.

As an example of a programmable light with adjustable feet, I like to use this:

Hygger auto on/off day/night cycle light that I use.

This is a full spectrum light, bit on the cheaper end, with a programmable day/night cycle. You could easily use the co-op light, too. When you are sizing a light, don't go with a light that will sit flush with the rim. By which I mean if you've got a 30" wide tank, don't buy the "fits 30"-36" size tanks". Remember that light spreads out. In that case you'd want the 24"-30" light, because the light is going to spread out those three inches in either direction easily as it heads down toward your substrate. Unless you're planting a suction cup mounted plant right up against the waterline, you'll never need those extra 6" of light. The price difference in lengths could be as little as $8, but it could also be $40 or more.

Other thing to look into if you decide to go programmable, is to decide if you want light mounted controls or cord mounted controls. I linked a light mounted control unit above, these are good for situations where you're going to be taller than the tank and can easily read/adjust the light. Controls are in the light itself, so everything is kind of contained. But let's say you have tanks on a rack that are going to be eye level or above, here's where a cord mounted control system is great. This is like the Co-op light where the control is part of the cord. Much easier to use on higher up tanks. Also good if you don't like to bend down to reach lower tanks. Cord mounted is often cheaper than light mounted.

 

Just some things to think about, I hope your experience goes well.

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On 6/22/2024 at 11:50 AM, Comradovich said:

When you are sizing a light, don't go with a light that will sit flush with the rim. By which I mean if you've got a 30" wide tank, don't buy the "fits 30"-36" size tanks". Remember that light spreads out. In that case you'd want the 24"-30" light, because the light is going to spread out those three inches in either direction easily as it heads down toward your substrate. Unless you're planting a suction cup mounted plant right up against the waterline, you'll never need those extra 6" of light.

That's interesting that you say that, because I've always done the opposite. That is, on a 30" tank, I'll make sure to get a 30" light so that I'm making sure to get light to as much of the tank as I can. I guess I could plant and hardscape it such that the ends don't need as much light, but I also like the idea of 'future-proofing' the tank a little, so that I have the flexibility to put whatever plants wherever I want later on. But you're right that longer lights get more expensive, and sometimes in a hurry.

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On 6/22/2024 at 11:50 AM, Comradovich said:

Okay, yeah. That is definitely a rimless tank. I kinda was heading in that direction on the two edits I did, but I don't think I quite got there. @Rube_Goldfish is correct that your lid situation is going to start with those brackets for rimless tanks. Looking on Amazon, a set of those is somewhere in the $8-$18 range. Now, you may be able to use a standard hinged glass lid from Petco/Petsmart with that, you just might need extra brackets for support, (basically meaning you buy 2 kits if you go this route).

Rimless tanks are typically lidded up with a single sheet of tempered glass, to give you that full surround "rimless" effect. I see a few kits on Amazon with clips + glass lid, that might be your best bet. Still measure the inside edges of the tank and see if you can find a lid that will fit. I have been pleasantly surprised this week when Amazon managed to ship me two glass lids without breaking either one of them. So I guess you don't have to be nervous about mail-ordering lids.

Now we can look at lighting. You want a light that is going to perch on top of your rim. Almost everything you look at is going to be adjustable. Look for something like "fits 24"-30" tanks". You really only need to go expensive on these if you've got expensive hard to grow plants. Looks like I can see some java ferns, annubias... maybe some cryptocorynes? All of those are low maintenance plants, you might be able to get away with cheap shop lights from Home Depot on those.

As an example of a programmable light with adjustable feet, I like to use this:

Hygger auto on/off day/night cycle light that I use.

This is a full spectrum light, bit on the cheaper end, with a programmable day/night cycle. You could easily use the co-op light, too. When you are sizing a light, don't go with a light that will sit flush with the rim. By which I mean if you've got a 30" wide tank, don't buy the "fits 30"-36" size tanks". Remember that light spreads out. In that case you'd want the 24"-30" light, because the light is going to spread out those three inches in either direction easily as it heads down toward your substrate. Unless you're planting a suction cup mounted plant right up against the waterline, you'll never need those extra 6" of light. The price difference in lengths could be as little as $8, but it could also be $40 or more.

Other thing to look into if you decide to go programmable, is to decide if you want light mounted controls or cord mounted controls. I linked a light mounted control unit above, these are good for situations where you're going to be taller than the tank and can easily read/adjust the light. Controls are in the light itself, so everything is kind of contained. But let's say you have tanks on a rack that are going to be eye level or above, here's where a cord mounted control system is great. This is like the Co-op light where the control is part of the cord. Much easier to use on higher up tanks. Also good if you don't like to bend down to reach lower tanks. Cord mounted is often cheaper than light mounted.

 

Just some things to think about, I hope your experience goes well.

Thanks for all your help and advice, I ordered some clips for 6MM glass which arrived yesterday and they fit perfectly. I have a 20G long from Aqueon for my Multies and it has the same dimensions as a 29T so I took the Aqueon glass versa top and it fits perfectly inside the new clips, so i'm going to order a second one of those covers. 

I use this Nicrew light on my 20 long, which I quite enjoy and I like the programmable wire controller so i'll probably get one of those for this tank too.

Yes you're right mostly those plants, some Fern, Anubias on the rocks and Crypts in the front.. You'll see some Val starting to re-appear the tank used to be full of it but I had a huge Algae bloom/Hair breakout so i went dark for quite a while and reduced feedings and I lost most my Val and my Crypts halved in size.

Once I get this sorted out I am going to do a rescape.

Thanks again everyone who took the time to help me out.

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