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Betta with clamped fins? Please help.


Bigdog99
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I have had a lot of trouble with this betta. He was very very sick a couple of days ago I thought he was 100% going too die from having a big belly and possibly it was swim bladder. I treated him by fasting him for 2 days and then feeding daphnia. He somehow pulled throw and is now swimming a good bit but I think his top fin has been clamped all his life! He was super sick a couple months ago but pulled through somehow. I keep him in a 5 gallon aquarium with a hang on back silentstream filter. Paremeters: ammonia 0ppm.nitrite 0 ppm. Nitrates are 5 ppm and ph 7.3. His fin is clamped and I have been doing aquarium salt! Do I need to something about this? His fins slightly rotted a couple of days ago. His belly is still big though….just fasted him again today but HELP!!!any advice at all I will accept!😥

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Several things to bear in mind…

(1) Betta splendens are far too selectively bred for certain fin traits to be healthy over the long haul. Those long ornamental fins are easily subject to infections. 

(2) The sources of health problems with Betta splendens fall broadly under four headings: [a] congenital health ailments… inherited from unhealthy brooders… may manifest slowly over time [b] internal ailments… due to improper feeding, poor digestion, blockage, etc… or internal parasites [c] external infections… bacterial, fungal, ich, etc. [d] external injuries… from sharp hardscape, from fighting, or from excessive flaring. You cannot treat [a]. It sounds like you’re tuned into [b]. Some medications might help [c] but that can be both risky and pricey. You can be thoughtful enough to mitigate [d]. 

(3) Bear in mind that all of these factors add up over time. You may have no idea what your fish has come through to arrive in your tank. Unless you buy from a breeder, you may not know how old your fish is. Old fish (like old people) break down. You can exercise due diligence to keep your water parameters healthy. Adding a catappa leaf generally helps Betta splendens. A bit of flow from a filter keeps water from getting overly stagnant. Finding the right temperature can be more important than you realize. Too hot… and bacteria begins to multiply exponentially; too cold, and your fish begins to break down.

Some potential ways to help…

(1) Add some live plants. Add a catappa leaf floating. Ensure that your tank is fully covered to maintain humidity above the water in cold, dry season. Betta splendens intake surface air. It is best if that air is humid. 

(2) Engage in a few minutes of mirror-play each day. Get your boy flexing his colors. Just use a hand mirror so he sees his reflection and flares up a bit. Do not overdo this. At the same time, ensure your water is regularly changed. Fish live in their own toilet, so to speak. Clean water will promote health. 

(3) Add a very lightly bubbling Ziss air-stone, or if you don’t already have one, a small sponge filter. Keep the bubbles very low / very small.

_______
I’m raising baby Betta splendens right now. It is a project!

My oldest son set up a nice 5.5 gal for a female Betta a few years ago. The environment was perfect, but she came with some genetic issues, grew a tumor from under her left gill, and passed…

My middle son kept a pretty Koi male, and adored him. But he also swung a baseball bat in his room and shattered the tank 😑

 

Edited by Fish Folk
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Oh ok thanks.Can plants live plants be in a tank with diatoms or do I need a snail?

On 1/27/2024 at 8:46 AM, Fish Folk said:

Several things to bear in mind…

(1) Betta splendens are far too selectively bred for certain fin traits to be healthy over the long haul. Those long ornamental fins are easily subject to infections. 

(2) The sources of health problems with Betta splendens fall broadly under four headings: [a] congenital health ailments… inherited from unhealthy brooders… may manifest slowly over time [b] internal ailments… due to improper feeding, poor digestion, blockage, etc… or internal parasites [c] external infections… bacterial, fungal, ich, etc. [d] external injuries… from sharp hardscape, from fighting, or from excessive flaring. You cannot treat [a]. It sounds like you’re tuned into [b]. Some medications might help [c] but that can be both risky and pricey. You can be thoughtful enough to mitigate [d]. 

(3) Bear in mind that all of these factors add up over time. You may have no idea what your fish has come through to arrive in your tank. Unless you buy from a breeder, you may not know how old your fish is. Old fish (like old people) break down. You can exercise due diligence to keep your water parameters healthy. Adding a catappa leaf generally helps Betta splendens. A bit of flow from a filter keeps water from getting overly stagnant. Finding the right temperature can be more important than you realize. Too hot… and bacteria begins to multiply exponentially; too cold, and your fish begins to break down.

Some potential ways to help…

(1) Add some live plants. Add a catappa leaf floating. Ensure that your tank is fully covered to maintain humidity above the water in cold, dry season. Betta splendens intake surface air. It is best if that air is humid. 

(2) Engage in a few minutes of mirror-play each day. Get your boy flexing his colors. Just use a hand mirror so he sees his reflection and flares up a bit. Do not overdo this. At the same time, ensure your water is regularly changed. Fish live in their own toilet, so to speak. Clean water will promote health. 

(3) Add a very lightly bubbling Ziss air-stone, or if you don’t already have one, a small sponge filter. Keep the bubbles very low / very small.

_______
I’m raising baby Betta splendens right now. It is a project!

My oldest son set up a nice 5.5 gal for a female Betta a few years ago. The environment was perfect, but she came with some genetic issues, grew a tumor from under her left gill, and passed…

My middle son kept a pretty Koi male, and adored him. But he also swung a baseball bat in his room and shattered the tank 😑

 

@Fish Folk

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On 1/27/2024 at 9:08 AM, Bigdog99 said:

Oh ok thanks.Can plants live plants be in a tank with diatoms or do I need a snail?

@Fish Folk

CA7CD65A-D4D0-433E-80B2-2436C04C04A3.jpeg

It is a bit hard to properly explain. Diatom algae is there because nutrients are available. If plants were there first, they might have absorbed nutrients before algae got ahold. Adding plants will help. I’m not sure which snails might cut through diatom algae. Be advised that snails can multiply out of hand.

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