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Ph is TO LOW FOR CYCLE! How do I raise it????


Bigdog99
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I am on day 18 and ph just dropped down to 6.7 or possibly less!!!! How do I fix this??!?! Doing a fishless cycle and currently ammonia and nitrite are .50 and 2 ppm. Nitrates are going up cycle may be done soon but what do I do?!

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On 1/19/2024 at 3:55 PM, Cory said:

Personally, I would add crushed coral to the substrate to help buffer it up.

I don’t have any. Any thing else for it to raise IMMEDIATLEY 

Like maybe a water change? And what is the best conditioner for during cycle? I have prime and stress coat and topfinn water conditioner 

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Why is it too low you think? I'm confused.

I have cycled tanks as low as 5.0 ph. No ammonia/ammonium and nitrite readings ever. No kh and almost no gh. Very low tds. Still cycled

Edited by Lennie
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Well I can’t answer that really…😅 ummmm can baking soda do anything bad for cycle? Just wanted cycle done sooner that’s all iguess

On 1/19/2024 at 4:23 PM, Lennie said:

Why is it too low you think? I'm confused.

I have cycled tanks as low as 5.0 ph. No ammonia/ammonium and nitrite readings ever.

 

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I would recommend an internet search “baking soda to raise aquarium ph.

 

I use Seachem Alkalinity buffer which is different, so I dont know the volume of baking soda.  I mentioned baking soda because you likely have it in your home today.

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On 1/19/2024 at 4:32 PM, Pepere said:

I would recommend an internet search “baking soda to raise aquarium ph.

 

I use Seachem Alkalinity buffer which is different, so I dont know the volume of baking soda.  I mentioned baking soda because you likely have it in your home today.

Yes I do and just looked it up and it said 1 teaspoon per 5 gallons of water so I will do 2.

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If it were me I wouldn’t use baking soda for this a 6.7 ph is perfectly capable of cycling the only time you’ll really struggle to cycle a tank is if it drops below 6 (if memory serves it’s actually like 5.4or5.6 but most of us can’t test that low) something to keep in mind is it’s really impossible to keep ph completely stable it moves if your going to start adding stuff to effect it test KH not ph chasing ph is like herding cats KH is really what matters 

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On 1/19/2024 at 4:54 PM, face said:

If it were me I wouldn’t use baking soda for this a 6.7 ph is perfectly capable of cycling the only time you’ll really struggle to cycle a tank is if it drops below 6 (if memory serves it’s actually like 5.4or5.6 but most of us can’t test that low) something to keep in mind is it’s really impossible to keep ph completely stable it moves if your going to start adding stuff to effect it test KH not ph chasing ph is like herding cats KH is really what matters 

Already did.😂 I see what u mean though 

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Baking soda raises kh.  Beneficial bacteria consume carbonates as part of their replication.

it would not be unusual for kh to diminish from establishing a cycle.

I would doubt any harm was done.

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On 1/19/2024 at 5:15 PM, Pepere said:

Baking soda raises kh.  Beneficial bacteria consume carbonates as part of their replication.

it would not be unusual for kh to diminish from establishing a cycle.

I would doubt any harm was done.

It worked!!!! The ph is now 7.5!

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On 1/19/2024 at 4:34 PM, Bigdog99 said:

Yes I do and just looked it up and it said 1 teaspoon per 5 gallons of water so I will do 2.

I see that you already did this, but just an fyi....there really isn't a hard and fast answer to this. It depends on what the KH/PH of your source water is in the first place. A teaspoon may have different end results in PH/KH.....depending on one's original start. A great way to test is to know the value of your source water, and add and mix in a given amount (say a teaspoon) to a 5 gallon bucket; wait a bit, and then retest. Then, you can determine what that given amount does to your water specifically.

In short, I have found a cycle will complete faster at a non-acidic PH. Just keep in mind when you add fish, you generally want them to see the source water perameters, and not a doctored value. (Unless you plan to consistantely doctor the water)

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On 1/20/2024 at 2:58 AM, quikv6 said:

I see that you already did this, but just an fyi....there really isn't a hard and fast answer to this. It depends on what the KH/PH of your source water is in the first place. A teaspoon may have different end results in PH/KH.....depending on one's original start. A great way to test is to know the value of your source water, and add and mix in a given amount (say a teaspoon) to a 5 gallon bucket; wait a bit, and then retest. Then, you can determine what that given amount does to your water specifically.

In short, I have found a cycle will complete faster at a non-acidic PH. Just keep in mind when you add fish, you generally want them to see the source water perameters, and not a doctored value. (Unless you plan to consistantely doctor the water)

So will this harm the tank? Because I added 1 teaspoon soooo……I hope not!😢 it should not right?

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@quikv6 My kh was 40ppm and gh 60 ppm in the first plAce even though seems like nobody measures kh and gh in ppm but that is what it read. I am also out of test strips so I guess I should order those? I use a master test kit for ammonia,nitrite,nitrates and ph and high range ph.but it doesn’t measure kh gh…

On 1/20/2024 at 8:47 AM, Bigdog99 said:

Messed up the quote on accident..🙄

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No, you have to get those separately. API still makes them. One of my lfs’s has some from a company called Sera. I find them much more accurate than strips. Coop strips always seem off to me 

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On 1/20/2024 at 9:10 AM, Tony s said:

No, you have to get those separately. API still makes them. One of my lfs’s has some from a company called Sera. I find them much more accurate than strips. Coop strips always seem off to me 

I just order some from Amazon. The API kind..I didn’t find anything more accurate than those. I have used the API ones and I don’t think it measures ph right but the others are good I think.

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On 1/20/2024 at 5:57 AM, Bigdog99 said:

@quikv6 My kh was 40ppm and gh 60 ppm in the first plAce even though seems like nobody measures kh and gh in ppm but that is what it read. I am also out of test strips so I guess I should order those? I use a master test kit for ammonia,nitrite,nitrates and ph and high range ph.but it doesn’t measure kh gh…

It's just because the most common method for accuracy would be the liquid tests. One drop means 1 degree, then you can convert that to ppm.

One thing to always keep in mind is your KH levels in the tap vs. the tank as well as your Gh ratio (compared to KH levels).

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I only have the Sera, haven't tried the API yet. but have been impressed with the Sera. going to get more test for iron, phosphates, etc...

Does Api us liquid suspension and reactive drops. where you count drops. I find that's the most accurate.

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I have found to the Tetra multi-strips to be the most accurate. "Accurate" = Closest to API liquid master kit used properly

The Co-op strips are fine, and pretty consistent when you need a quick check to make sure there are no outliers. I do find them a bit off from the Tetra strips, and liquid kit.

The API strips have been the worst for me, to be honest.

Anything is better than nothing when it comes to the ability to test if needed.

 

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Thank u @nabokovfan87!

On 1/20/2024 at 10:28 AM, quikv6 said:

I have found to the Tetra multi-strips to be the most accurate. "Accurate" = Closest to API liquid master kit used properly

The Co-op strips are fine, and pretty consistent when you need a quick check to make sure there are no outliers. I do find them a bit off from the Tetra strips, and liquid kit.

The API strips have been the worst for me, to be honest.

Anything is better than nothing when it comes to the ability to test if needed.

 

Yeah

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