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MDF and materials for stand


Jackson
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Most stands that are commercially sold for aquariums are made out of MDF, particle board or other similar materials. I personally prefer something out of solid wood or metal. But, if you are careful, and don't spill water on the stand or if you do, get it cleaned up right away, you should be fine with a 10 gallon on there

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On 7/27/2023 at 6:43 AM, Andy's Fish Den said:

Most stands that are commercially sold for aquariums are made out of MDF, particle board or other similar materials. I personally prefer something out of solid wood or metal. But, if you are careful, and don't spill water on the stand or if you do, get it cleaned up right away, you should be fine with a 10 gallon on there

I would prefer better wood materials as well  . It's either painted or stained so that will help with water spills as there will be some . I like they use another piece of wood for the base/floor . Come in handy for the floor I have . Legs like to sink in to the carpet pad and into a crack in the old wood floor under it . 

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I'm not a lumber or furniture expert, but something irreversible happens when MDF/chipboard gets wet, even a bit. The particles and/or the binder swells up, and it never goes back to its original shape/form/thickness. A drop here or there, if wiped up right away, won't be an issue, but if a little bit runs or draws under the tank... Maybe you can get a piece of plywood or lexan or something like that and make an after-market topper or cover, just a thin sheet on top that goes beyond the edges by a teeny bit. Put a stain on it that matches your piece, and you're done. Double benefit: spilled water will be less likely to reach the MDF (unless it's larger volumes); and if there are any issues the cover will hide them. 

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I am sure this will probably work, but long term it might break down if it gets wet. Id try to go with something made of more sturdy wood - or a strong piece of furniture. The bigger you go the more you should think about the stand. I currently have a 10 gallon on my bathroom countertop and it’s doing great!

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One benefit of mdf, particle board and the similar is that they are very flat and if treated properly with paint or some other kind of water resistant finish, they can stay flat and last a long time. It’s not pretty, but if you mix wood glue and water and coat the cabinet, it makes a decant water resistant coat.

I was a cabinet maker when I wore a younger man’s clothes.

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On 7/27/2023 at 7:47 AM, Janoš Bećar Pecaroš said:

One benefit of mdf, particle board and the similar is that they are very flat and if treated properly with paint or some other kind of water resistant finish, they can stay flat and last a long time. It’s not pretty, but if you mix wood glue and water and coat the cabinet, it makes a decant water resistant coat.

I was a cabinet maker when I wore a younger man’s clothes.

I was a carpenter for many a year and am familiar with different woods and composites ... I know the pros and cons of it . Just never used it directly with all the water activity around it . I know particle board / MDF ( more moisture resistant ) can just disintegrate with a drop of water .  Wondering if any had experience using it for a stand, seen this nasty stuff in use .

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The beauty of aquarium stands in the 10 gallon size is that almost anything works.  As already mentioned, composite wood and water don't mix.  A laminated piece of wood should be waterproof.  I have had painted surfaces fail.  My aquariums sit on a rubber pad that prevents water from seeping underneath.

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On 7/27/2023 at 8:49 AM, Tanked said:

The beauty of aquarium stands in the 10 gallon size is that almost anything works.  As already mentioned, composite wood and water don't mix.  A laminated piece of wood should be waterproof.  I have had painted surfaces fail.  My aquariums sit on a rubber pad that prevents water from seeping underneath.

Rubber pad is a good idea . 👍  Maybe polyurethane the platform . 

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On 7/27/2023 at 8:56 AM, Jackson said:

Rubber pad is a good idea . 👍  Maybe polyurethane the platform . 

Multiple coats of polyurethane might work.  I've used a closed cell foam pad that doubles as a cushion for the aquarium and I've used rubber roofing material.  It doesn't offer any padding, but it does act as a gasket to keep the water from getting underneath.

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Hobby woodworker here - if you can keep it absolutely dry, you should get a couple years out of it.  Frequent spills, even minor, will warp this very quickly.  So will too much ambiant humidity.  MFD also isn’t going to hold whatever joinery is used as well as solid wood, making shifting or loosening of joins more likely.  
 
Basically, if this was $60 at HomeGoods, eh, use it for as long as it lasts while you save for better.  For $117, you’re better off going for something used but higher quality.

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On 7/27/2023 at 2:43 PM, Epiphanaea said:

Hobby woodworker here - if you can keep it absolutely dry, you should get a couple years out of it.  Frequent spills, even minor, will warp this very quickly.  So will too much ambiant humidity.  MFD also isn’t going to hold whatever joinery is used as well as solid wood, making shifting or loosening of joins more likely.  
 
Basically, if this was $60 at HomeGoods, eh, use it for as long as it lasts while you save for better.  For $117, you’re better off going for something used but higher quality.

Looking at some kitchen island units now . wood tops, wheels .. Not much more money and I think would fair much better than the one shown . 

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