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Hair algae problem in Neocaridina tank with baby shrimplettes


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Howdy all. I've been reading some old threads here and watched some YouTube videos on how to get rid of hair algae. My issue is, I have about 30-40 shrimplettes in varying sizes, between a couple days old and a couple weeks old. I'm trying to remove the hair algae manually, but the little ones are all over everything and hard to see. I am looking for a solution that will have minimal impact on my shrimp colony. I'm wondering if a blackout is the best solution? Any tips or ideas would be appreciated 

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That’s a tricky problem. I think I’d probably back off on the light duration or intensity before trying a blackout. If the algae doesn’t start to die back after three weeks then try the blackout. 
You could also remove the algae to a small container, if you get any shrimplets with the algae you could net them back into the main tank. (Not sure easy, but doable) 

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On 8/3/2022 at 10:00 AM, Patrick_G said:

That’s a tricky problem. I think I’d probably back off on the light duration or intensity before trying a blackout. If the algae doesn’t start to die back after three weeks then try the blackout. 
You could also remove the algae to a small container, if you get any shrimplets with the algae you could net them back into the main tank. (Not sure easy, but doable) 

I agree. It's difficult but the shrimplets lives depend on it!

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On 8/2/2022 at 5:00 PM, Patrick_G said:

That’s a tricky problem. I think I’d probably back off on the light duration or intensity before trying a blackout. If the algae doesn’t start to die back after three weeks then try the blackout. 
You could also remove the algae to a small container, if you get any shrimplets with the algae you could net them back into the main tank. (Not sure easy, but doable) 

Yeah for sure. I did manage to remove some manually today with aquascape tongs and used your suggested method of using a small container. I did catch a few and used a turkey baster to put them back in the tank. I found this easier than a net. 

I lowered the intensity of the light by half and also switched to a white light setting, whereas before it was on High and full spectrum 

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On 8/2/2022 at 8:28 PM, BradleyH20 said:

Yeah for sure. I did manage to remove some manually today with aquascape tongs and used your suggested method of using a small container. I did catch a few and used a turkey baster to put them back in the tank. I found this easier than a net. 

I lowered the intensity of the light by half and also switched to a white light setting, whereas before it was on High and full spectrum 

I'm a big fan of the purpose made shrimp nets.  They're smaller than most standard fish nets, and are stiff, so they don't collapse.  I have three of them scattered around so there's always one handy.   They're around $7.00 on Amazon, and it's money well spent.  I have one square one and two round, and I prefer the round ones.  https://www.amazon.com/Carefree-Fish-Aquarium-Stainless-Extendable/dp/B085XRLZZT/ref=sr_1_3_sspa?crid=34LM8NAYBYRNF&keywords=shrimp+net&qid=1659536342&s=pet-supplies&sprefix=shrimp+net%2Cpets%2C91&sr=1-3-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUEzQVJWVUk5TUVFSlpKJmVuY3J5cHRlZElkPUEwNTM2MjQzU1oyQTYxVDA1NEpFJmVuY3J5cHRlZEFkSWQ9QTA5Mzg3NDkxUDFGVDZKQjUwM0tFJndpZGdldE5hbWU9c3BfYXRmJmFjdGlvbj1jbGlja1JlZGlyZWN0JmRvTm90TG9nQ2xpY2s9dHJ1ZQ==

I don't think Aquarium Co-op sells them, but it might be something to consider.

Edited by JettsPapa
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On 8/3/2022 at 11:46 AM, Patrick_G said:

In my experience hair algae loves white light. Anyone else have this experience? 

My recent foray into lighting would indicate that plants are not necessarily as able to best utilize white light (compared to true full spectrum) and it could mean the algae is able to better use the lighting and thusly the nutrients. Lighting optimization is quite the topic...

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I've had this tank going since November and recently started adding Bacter AE. Only 1/8 of a scoop per week for the last month and this is when I noticed the rapid growth of the hair algae.  Anyone have experience with this or maybe it's coincidental?

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When I first started my shrimp tank I was doing about that dosage of bacter ae for about 6 weeks before I got the shrimp. I did notice a ball of green hair alge on my floating hornwort. Luckily I could just cut off the piece with all the alge on it. So I'm not sure if the bacter ae helped promote the alge or not. I'm still doing the same dosage since adding the shrimp. If I notice anymore hair algae growth I'll let you know. Right now I only rim my lights on that tank for about 8 hours a day.

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I actually watched a YouTube thing awhile back by I think by prime time aquatics but can’t remember. Full 6 day blackout on a hair algae infested like giant ball tank take over on a shrimp tank. It had very little affect on the algae if I remember.  I would continue manual removal and as @Patrick_G said cut back on light and save the hair algae to net the shrimp. Also increase water change to lower nutrient level and back off on feeding. In my experience hair algae loves all light colors. 
 

Reverse Respiration in this case is not a good choice. Every time I use a cycled sponge to jump a tank even swishing the sponge vigorously I get tons of shrimplette hitchhikers. The newborn look like wiggly dust specks to me so it would be impossible to not kill the shrimplettes with RR. 

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On 8/5/2022 at 7:34 AM, Guppysnail said:

I actually watched a YouTube thing awhile back by I think by prime time aquatics but can’t remember. Full 6 day blackout on a hair algae infested like giant ball tank take over on a shrimp tank. It had very little affect on the algae if I remember.  I would continue manual removal and as @Patrick_G said cut back on light and save the hair algae to net the shrimp. Also increase water change to lower nutrient level and back off on feeding. In my experience hair algae loves all light colors. 
 

Reverse Respiration in this case is not a good choice. Every time I use a cycled sponge to jump a tank even swishing the sponge vigorously I get tons of shrimplette hitchhikers. The newborn look like wiggly dust specks to me so it would be impossible to not kill the shrimplettes with RR. 

That why I call for help on the RR. I still would use the hydrogen peroxide but I know the scares people. 

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On 8/5/2022 at 8:17 AM, Brandon p said:

That why I call for help on the RR. I still would use the hydrogen peroxide but I know the scares people. 

I watched a thing I think Mark or Marcus fish tanks where he dosed his shrimp tanks with H2O2. I think in this instance you are correct that if manual removal does not control it (I would not aim for eradication algae is healthy in tanks especially shrimp tanks) the H2o2 CAREFULLY and minimally. 

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One of the things I've done is get a 10L tub from smart and final and put the algae or plant cuttings into it with water from the tank and just set it aside for the shrimp to grow for a week or so. Then you can see them and catch them easier. I did this on accident once and now I do it on purpose all the time.

Edited by Minanora
Autocorrect...
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Light has been reduced from 100% output, down to 50% output . I've also cut the time from 8 hours, down to 6. It's seem to slow the growth quite a bit and I've been trying to do some manual removal every 2 or 3 days. It's getting better,  but still an eye sore. I'll be doing a 25% WC this weekend and will need to clean the sponge filter, as it's completely covered and probably affecting the filtration. 

I read that more water flow can greatly reduce the growth of hair algae as well and that Neos come from highly oxygenated streams with lots of flow. Thinking about adding a small powerhead or some other option to increase oxygen and flow. Any tips/suggestions? 

Thanks for the good conversation everyone :classic_biggrin:

Edited by BradleyH20
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  • 2 weeks later...

Finally got the hair algae under control. There's still a tiny bit attached to my Vals, but it doesn't seem to be growing anymore. Most of the shrimp are hiding because i just did a WC. Just noticed a fresh batch of shrimplettes today as well, thinking my count is up to about 40 or so shrimp🤠👍

20220817_105645.jpg

Edited by BradleyH20
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On 8/3/2022 at 6:55 PM, BradleyH20 said:

I've had this tank going since November and recently started adding Bacter AE. Only 1/8 of a scoop per week for the last month and this is when I noticed the rapid growth of the hair algae.  Anyone have experience with this or maybe it's coincidental?

Does it contain Phosphate? Iron?

 

Quote

Ingredients:
Amino acids, polysaccarides, xylanase, glucanase, amylase, protease, hemicellulase, Bacillus subtilis, Pediococcus acidilactici (Lactobacillus)

Based on what I am seeing, no.  It might have some molecules that break down and contribute to the issue.  One thing to keep in mind with shrimp is that a lot of them do not like hair algae.  If it's too long, even amanos won't touch the stuff.  If it's a certain texture, they avoid it.  There's been some reports that after scrubbing algae you'll see the shrimp then go after it.  Manual removal is always the key with some of the more difficult algaes like staghorn and BBA.  When it comes to any algae issue, the key is to provide consistency and then to balance whatever is out of sync and contributing to that growth.  It could be lights, nutrients, or the water itself causing the issues.

If you can, start with something like a phosphate test kit and see what your tap has and what your tank has.  If you have rotting plants and a lot of food, that's going to contribute to nutrients the algae will use.

Edited by nabokovfan87
added ingredient list
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