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Vermiculture for Live Food


Struggle
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We’ve decided to raise red wigglers to provide live food and also help out with our garden.
We are using a Vermibagtote with a pound of worms to inoculate it and it seems to doing fine so far. It’s being kept in the fish room on top of the mini fridge and has been at about 78 degrees. The bedding is a mixture of shredded paper, cardboard, cup of cow manure and coco coir. Our fist feeding was banana, cabbage, coffee, worm chow and crushed egg shell.

Does anyone else do this, how do you do it and are there any tips or things to look out for? 

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I have a big trashcan with wheels that I keep in the backyard. I loaded it up initially with leaves and yard waste. Now I pretty much put in kitchen scraps or anything else that's organic and I want to toss. I started out with redwiggler volunteers, but they were quickly eclipsed by the black soldier fly larva. Those suckers are great. They will eat just about anything, and in a hurry! They are also less sensitive to moisture, ph and heat than earthworms. I love raising my worms because they were...

1. Free

2. Easy to care for

3. Provide a great soil ammendment 

4. The fish love em

I still have redwrigglers in there, they just hang out deeper in the bin. Winter is their time to shine

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Edited by Expectorating_Aubergine
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Black soldier fly larvae (phoenix worms) are higher in calcium with a better calcium to phosphorus ratio, which I’m sure is part of the reason that “Bug Bites” uses them as the main base for most of their foods.  Depending on the species, red wrigglers are also a great food.  There are studies that show that they remove pathogens from what they ingest.  I haven’t seen any studies on whether black soldier fly larva do the same.

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On 1/14/2022 at 6:02 PM, Expectorating_Aubergine said:

I have a big trashcan with wheels that I keep in the backyard. I loaded it up initially with leaves and yard waste. Now I pretty much put in kitchen scraps or anything else that's organic and I want to toss. I started out with redwiggler volunteers, but they were quickly eclipsed by the black soldier fly larva. Those suckers are great. They will eat just about anything, and in a hurry! They are also less sensitive to moisture, ph and heat than earthworms. I love raising my worms because they were...

1. Free

2. Easy to care for

3. Provide a great soil ammendment 

4. The fish love em

I still have redwrigglers in there, they just hang out deeper in the bin. Winter is their time to shine

20211105_123149.jpg

20211105_123108.jpg

20211003_093313.jpg

I had these before I got married. 

One of the promises /hard boundaries were to ensure mine and the kids 'projects' wouldn't trigger my spouse who has the strong reaction to holes (I don't remember the name of the phobia) nor the stronger reaction to worms/larvae.

That's part of what makes it so awesome that after 7 years, my spouse is enamored with a tank... that has fry... and they eat blackworms and bloodworms. 

I keep all live worm cultures in my room, and frozen are kept inside a brown paper bag. And I gave up vermiculture as an option, to prevent potential issues. 

 

See what love can do?🥰

 

PS~your vermiculture of soldier flies is amazing!

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