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Has any on heard of a fresh water Frogfish?


Cohen
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I love odd ball fish in the aquarium hobby but have just discovered Frogfish. Typically Frogfish or salt water fish but I have heard of a freshwater frog fish. Does anyone have a frog fish or a freshwater one?  Is it really freshwater? 

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Just like any saltwater fish labeled as freshwater, they come from estuarine environments and can tolerate freshwater for a long duration, but prefer brackish environments.

 

See also freshwater morays, freshwater tonguefish, and freshwater pipefish.

 

Freshwater frogfish can be an intriguing addition to the home. They are rather sedentary so do not require a large tank. They are quite content with multiple hides to move around to and they become fond of their handler as they really enjoy eating. Since they enjoy eating nothing is safe to inhabit this tank with them except small shrimp, copepods, and worms.

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On 12/20/2021 at 9:57 PM, Biotope Biologist said:

Just like any saltwater fish labeled as freshwater, they come from estuarine environments and can tolerate freshwater for a long duration, but prefer brackish environments.

 

See also freshwater morays, freshwater tonguefish, and freshwater pipefish.

 

Freshwater frogfish can be an intriguing addition to the home. They are rather sedentary so do not require a large tank. They are quite content with multiple hides to move around to and they become fond of their handler as they really enjoy eating. Since they enjoy eating nothing is safe to inhabit this tank with them except small shrimp, copepods, and worms.

Thanks! 

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Bumblebee Gobies are another of those estuary type fish that prefer brackish water but can live and do well in freshwater. Fish that live in large rivers tend to be pretty adaptable. Swim closer to the bay/ocean and the water gets a bit saltier. Swim farther upstream and the water gets less salty. Back in the 70's and 80's I used to fish down by the Salem Nuclear Reactors. It's where the Delaware River (freshwater) meets the Delaware Bay (saltwater). There used to be an area near some old concrete ships abandoned after WWII that were placed as a breakwater (aerial photo of them below) where fish would congregate. Depending on the tides, time of year, and mood of the fish, you'd catch pure freshwater fish or pure saltwater fish. Sometimes both at the same time. It was good fishing, but then declared off limits due to safety concerns of people being that near the reactors. Concrete was used for boat construction during WWII due to the shortage of steel and the hulls of those boats were pretty impressive. The only way to see them now is through aerial views as the roads in the area are now blocked and guarded. Civilians just can't get there these days.

 

concrete boats.jpg

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@gardenman; I was born in Perryville, MD, but wasn't raised there. I've never fished the Delaware Bay, but I've fished the Chesapeake Bay from its mouth up to Havre de Grace while my father was stationed at Langley from '66 to '69, I love those Spot, Croaker, Flounder, and especially those Stripers. I used to catch an occasional Toadfish and I didn't really pay that much attention to them once I caught them, I'd kill them and throw the carcass overboard for the crabs to eat. A Toadfish by name leads me to believe it's a species of Frogfish, but is it? I never really paid much attention, it's considered a trash fish, so that's how I treated each one I caught.

Do you want to see a couple of satellite images that are really cool? Follow the Potomac River upstream from the Chesapeake Bay and pay attention to the North Shore, at one point you will see a flotilla of wooden hulled ships that the US Navy scuttled in place because they weren't needed any more. They make a great location for Stripers to wait until the tide starts coming back in so they can continue their migration to their spawning grounds, and you can fish there with no problems other than you'll need a boat.

If you follow the Potomac River closer to Washington D.C., you'll see the submerged hull of a WWII German U-Boat in the middle of the river. The rumor is that a German U-Boat sailed into the Chesapeake Bay without being detected. The U-Boat sailed up the Potomac River with the intention of doing damage to the Washington D.C. Naval yard and to Washington D.C. also. A couple of fishermen spotted the U-Boat, went ashore, called the Navy, and the Navy sank the U-Boat with no loss of life of those onboard. Whether it's trye or not, I don't know, but there is something in the Potomac that resembles the hull of a submarine.

  

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I've been known to spend hours looking at satellite images myself, mostly places where I used to live. I've also checked out the runway numbers of civilian and military airfields, but that was to find out the compass heading used by those airfields. Don't go looking for Area 51, I've done it and have found it on my first try, but somehow the computer I used to find it and two subsequent computers I used to look at it were all fried beyond repair. Why, and more importantly, how?

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On 12/20/2021 at 9:57 PM, Biotope Biologist said:

Just like any saltwater fish labeled as freshwater, they come from estuarine environments and can tolerate freshwater for a long duration, but prefer brackish environments.

 

See also freshwater morays, freshwater tonguefish, and freshwater pipefish.

 

Freshwater frogfish can be an intriguing addition to the home. They are rather sedentary so do not require a large tank. They are quite content with multiple hides to move around to and they become fond of their handler as they really enjoy eating. Since they enjoy eating nothing is safe to inhabit this tank with them except small shrimp, copepods, and worms.

Do you have one? 

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On 12/21/2021 at 11:44 AM, StockEwe49 said:

Zenzo has a video about a "Freshwater" Blenny. I recommend watching it.

Are you referring to his tophat blennies? They are very lovely fish and I hope to have some in my mangrove tank, especially now that they are captive bred. Makes the burden rest a little easier on my shoulders. Those are also brackish fish.

 

On 12/21/2021 at 1:13 PM, Cohen said:

Do you have one? 

Nope but I have experience with them in a laboratory setting. Although I believe my professor's was a personal pet of his. Couldn't tell you the variety but I believe it was a locally caught one. Here in the puget sound we have a LOT of river fed tributaries so most fish here can tolerate salinity fluctuations of 1.008-1.030 rather commonly. Although in a laboratory setting we cheat we have pipes that return and feed fresh sound water estuarine animals quite like it. An inline UV filter prevents most cross contamination.

Edited by Biotope Biologist
Forgot a 0 that order of magnitude would have been brutal
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On 12/21/2021 at 3:37 PM, Biotope Biologist said:

Are you referring to his tophat blennies? They are very lovely fish and I hope to have some in my mangrove tank, especially now that they are captive bred. Makes the burden rest a little easier on my shoulders. Those are also brackish fish.

 

Nope but I have experience with them in a laboratory setting. Although I believe my professor's was a personal pet of his. Couldn't tell you the variety but I believe it was a locally caught one. Here in the puget sound we have a LOT of river fed tributaries so most fish here can tolerate salinity fluctuations of 1.008-1.030 rather commonly. Although in a laboratory setting we cheat we have pipes that return and feed fresh sound water estuarine animals quite like it. An inline UV filter prevents most cross contamination.

Wow, that’s cool. Thanks 

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