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Ecology of the Planted Aquarium: A Practical Manual and Scientific Treatise by Diana Louise Walstad.  

https://www.amazon.com/Ecology-Planted-Aquarium-Practical-Scientific-ebook/dp/B00DB94K5I/ref=tmm_kin_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1632156082&sr=8-3

This is a good planted tank reverence. It is very science focused and more like a college text book than an easy read. 

If you are near a good sized public library they may have a copy. The kindle copy is affordable, but works better on a PC or tablet, there are a lot of tables and graphs to reference.

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On 9/20/2021 at 11:59 AM, Odd Duck said:

😆

I haven’t bought an aquarium book since Amano’s first book came out.  Everything since then has been on line reading and just “doing” to learn stuff.

I have that book and Walstads books.  I don’t remember the last time I picked them up.  Everything is digital today hence my comment earlier.  We have access to so much more information today which is a good thing but in my opinion we have lost the emotions that go with sitting down and reading on a subject and really thinking on it that goes with books. 

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On 9/20/2021 at 10:06 AM, ARMYVET said:

I have that book and Walstads books.  I don’t remember the last time I picked them up.  Everything is digital today hence my comment earlier.  We have access to so much more information today which is a good thing but in my opinion we have lost the emotions that go with sitting down and reading on a subject and really thinking on it that goes with books. 

Yup, and it’s hard to use YouTube as a reference, but enough click bait links will distract the professor from your paper! 

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Peter Hiscock books were widely referenced when I was younger as well as the Walstad approach. Watching Cory's Peru collection videos can give you a sense of what these fish actually live in before they are shipped across the world.

 

On @David W's point of scientific research articles usually typing either the title of the scientific article or papers it was referenced in (right hand corner of google scholar) you can usually find the data you need for free. Unfortunately my College e-mail expired a couple years ago so I am locked out of scientific databases I was once accustomed to, but there are always ways around that. Also if you have the luxury of living near a college, some allow membership into their libraries for non-students and their resources are fantastic.

 

Edit: I think some Public libraries also have subscriptions to scientific databases on their computers, but don't quote me on that.

Edited by Biotope Biologist
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If the average individual wants access to peer-reviewed research, typing *peer-reviewed* plus what you are researching should bring up plenty of open access articles. 

I use OWL (online writing library) from Purdue to format my sources for all my papers, because half of what I write is in APA style, and the other half is whatever style is listed as the requisite. 

I miss my old school days:

Spending hours in the stacks with the smell of leather bound books. However, while I would have found Dr Diana Walstad's Treatise in the NCSU stacks, I don't think I would have found a copy of the peer-reviewed research on the therapeutic effects of catawba or Indian Almond Leaves on the domesticated betta splendens.

 

(It's a great article, btw)

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If you're interested in fish collecting in the wild then the YouTube channel "Freshwater Exotics" is a good option for you. They mostly collect in Brazil while Cory collects in Peru. Freshwater Exotics even has a new trip starting on 10/04-10/16 if you're interested in seeing what happens firsthand. You can sign up and go along with them on a collecting expedition. Their videos are quite good. They visit local fishermen, fish markets, fish wholesalers and transhippers, etc. You see pretty much every part of the process from start to finish.

General tropical fish books vary a lot. Gunther Sterba's "Freshwater Fishes of the World" has pretty much every native freshwater fish you'll ever find in it. If you're looking for fish-centric books, that's hard to beat. Herbert Axelrod was a prolific author on aquariums and aquarium fish. Most libraries will have a few (or more) of his books on hand.

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On 9/21/2021 at 7:38 AM, gardenman said:

If you're interested in fish collecting in the wild then the YouTube channel "Freshwater Exotics" is a good option for you. They mostly collect in Brazil while Cory collects in Peru. Freshwater Exotics even has a new trip starting on 10/04-10/16 if you're interested in seeing what happens firsthand. You can sign up and go along with them on a collecting expedition. Their videos are quite good. They visit local fishermen, fish markets, fish wholesalers and transhippers, etc. You see pretty much every part of the process from start to finish.

General tropical fish books vary a lot. Gunther Sterba's "Freshwater Fishes of the World" has pretty much every native freshwater fish you'll ever find in it. If you're looking for fish-centric books, that's hard to beat. Herbert Axelrod was a prolific author on aquariums and aquarium fish. Most libraries will have a few (or more) of his books on hand.

Don’t forget William Innis’ books.

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