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Using Tea to add tannins, has anyone tried these ;~?


Wellxam
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I have my Celestial Seasonings Sleepytime Tea, which is caffeen free and contains the following:

Chamomile, spearmint, leamongrass, Tilia flowers, blackberry leaves, orange blossoms, hawthorn and rosebuds

Has anyone done testing and/or used any of these particular ingredients for adding tannins, treating disease, de-stressing fish etc... or are you aware of any negative side-effects of using any of these ingredients?

Will this put my fish to sleep ;~? x~D

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  I wouldn't use your sleepy time tea at all.  Indian almond leaves, adler cones, or peat in the filter are all great ways to add tannins. If you have a lfs nearby, they will most likely sell all three of these things. Certain types of driftwood will leech tannins as well.  It will stain your water brown.  Some people don't like the look.  

If I had soft water, I would totally run a blackwater tank.  

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On 9/17/2021 at 10:50 AM, sairving said:

  I wouldn't use your sleepy time tea at all.  Indian almond leaves, adler cones, or peat in the filter are all great ways to add tannins. If you have a lfs nearby, they will most likely sell all three of these things. Certain types of driftwood will leech tannins as well.  It will stain your water brown.  Some people don't like the look.  

If I had soft water, I would totally run a blackwater tank.  

@sairving Reasons and/or explanation behind your opinion?

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I do use 100% pure Rooibos tea bags for on-the-spot tannin boost.

 CE459390-C398-4B10-890B-B7326D9EA10E.jpeg.5d885e8f200870a49cd63bd9be8ecb2a.jpeg

I’ve used this to battle fungus in Killifish hatching jugs…

71769C8F-02D8-489C-B287-DAFF5A3FD50C.jpeg.19456cb81d6fbcfc22f811df4dd8e8cd.jpeg

And to slightly bump up tannins for selected tanks…

C9C8094F-43D0-405A-A16F-3FC002BC1EDF.jpeg.e323ce34a72566ddb00a16cf21c1d78d.jpeg

I usually add 2x Rooibos Tea bags for a 40-55 gal tank after a water change. I let them float for about 24 hrs. You can certainly do more if you like. The effect is more pronounced with smaller tanks. You’ll want to be sure there’s no carbon in the filter though.

New mopani wood will release a lot of tannins, as will Catappa leaves and Alder cones. Beware: their breakdown builds up humic acid which will _lower_ your pH over time. 

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On 9/17/2021 at 11:00 AM, Wellxam said:

@sairving Reasons and/or explanation behind your opinion?

Sorry if my inner tea snob comes out lol. Herbal teas (tisanes) may or may not have tannins in them.  Tea is made by using cured camellia sinensis leaves and water.  Tea will always have caffeine in it.  White, yellow, green, black, and oolong tea all comes from the same plant.  It just depends on conditions the plants are grown in, when the leaves are picked, and how they are prepared after picking. Tea will have tannins.  Tannins are what you taste when the leaves have been steeped too long or the water was too hot.   

Like fish folk said, you can use rooibos.  Rooibos comes from a completely different plant,  is caffeine free, and releases tannins.   

Indian almond leaves, adler cones, mopani wood, peat, and a few more botanicals will release tannins.  I just toss part of an Indian almond leaf in my tank and a few Adler cones.  

 

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On 9/17/2021 at 9:52 AM, Wellxam said:

I have my Celestial Seasonings Sleepytime Tea, which is caffeen free and contains the following:

Chamomile, spearmint, leamongrass, Tilia flowers, blackberry leaves, orange blossoms, hawthorn and rosebuds

Has anyone done testing and/or used any of these particular ingredients for adding tannins, treating disease, de-stressing fish etc... or are you aware of any negative side-effects of using any of these ingredients?

Will this put my fish to sleep ;~? x~D

I don’t think any of these ingredients are going to release tannins.  I would follow others advice plus add oak leaves as another known source of tannins that’s safe for aquarium use.

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On 9/17/2021 at 4:30 PM, Odd Duck said:

I don’t think any of these ingredients are going to release tannins.  I would follow others advice plus add oak leaves as another known source of tannins that’s safe for aquarium use.

So I guess what is the difference between tannins and the color of the “tea?” What elements leech out of these if they are not tannins ;~?

I guess it was my understanding that any dried leaves would provide tannins, e.g. if I were to collect my maple leaves and rosebush leaves etc… during fall would adding those also be a waste of time ;~?

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On 9/18/2021 at 6:01 AM, Wellxam said:

So I guess what is the difference between tannins and the color of the “tea?” What elements leech out of these if they are not tannins ;~?

I guess it was my understanding that any dried leaves would provide tannins, e.g. if I were to collect my maple leaves and rosebush leaves etc… during fall would adding those also be a waste of time ;~?

I'm pretty sure the color of tea has something to do with the oxidation process.  

https://www.sciencelearn.org.nz/resources/1661-the-science-of-tea

 

Do some research on blackwater tanks.  You'll learn what aquarium safe botanicals are used.  The other thing you can if you don't want to add botanicals to the tank, is boil Adler cones and other recommended botanicals.  Scoop them out, let the water cool, then bottle the water.  You'll can add tannins whenever you want then.  

On 9/18/2021 at 6:23 AM, Nooby said:

I use exclusively Indian almond leaves because it’s free where I am , I just go outside and pick up some.

Lucky

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On 9/18/2021 at 6:01 AM, Wellxam said:

So I guess what is the difference between tannins and the color of the “tea?” What elements leech out of these if they are not tannins ;~?

I guess it was my understanding that any dried leaves would provide tannins, e.g. if I were to collect my maple leaves and rosebush leaves etc… during fall would adding those also be a waste of time ;~?

Maple will have some tannins, but not as much as oak leaves, Indian almond leaves (IAL), alder cones, the Rooibos tea, etc.  Fruitwoods typically have fairly minimal tannins compared to oak, etc.  I’m no expert in this category, but tannins aren’t found in flowers, for the most part.  Lots of herbal teas are made from the flowers of plants (3 different ones in the tea you listed).  Several of the herbs in that tea have organic compounds, but not all organic compounds are tannins.

I don’t know if rose bush leaves will have tannins but I doubt they have much.  Rose leaves are edible and most leaves that are rich in tannins are not considered good to eat since they are quite astringent and even bitter.  Consuming too much tannins can even cause health problems in people.

Most any wood will have some tannins, as @Nooby said.  Whether they are considered a significant source of tannins is another matter.  Cholla doesn’t seem to have huge amounts, but the water will turn a medium brown if you boil it.  For me, it doesn’t turn the water brown if you just soak it in room temp water or put it in the tank.

Mopani wood usually releases a significant amount of tannins and just putting it in your tank will darken the water.  Boiling it will usually give you very dark water which can be used to make a black water tank or used as a water treatment for certain situations.

When we typically think of “tea” we think of leaves and buds from the Camellia sinensis plant, but a “tea” can be made from almost any plant when you look at how herbalists think of “teas”.  It just means that the leaves (of whatever plant) have been steeped in hot water to release whatever compounds they may contain.  Whether those compounds are tannins, dyes, or poisons depends on the plant, berry, or even mushroom used.

Most anything that’s a tea that is safe for people to consume is fairly likely to be safe for our fish, but it may not accomplish what you’re looking for in this situation.

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@Wellxam I wouldn't use the herbal sleepy time because aromatic oils left in the spearmint and in the lemongrass can harm your fish.

A rule of harvesting plants / woods for tanks that I was taught (back in the 70's when I started this hobby😅) was fish gills are sensitive, and if I can smell it then it's damaging the gills.

While a lot of "canon" from when I first started has been disproven, even aquariumscience dot org says when collecting woods for the aquarium, don't use any that still have the smell (yes, even pines and junipers and cedars can be used, as long as they are not rotted and are not sappy).

I read an article about not using watermint in tanks with fish, for the same reason as not using sappy wood in tanks: the turpenes, pinenes and other aromatic plant oils can damage the gills. Kind of like putting a q-tip with a minute amount of essential oil on it up your nose: it will burn.

Many aquarists will use roobio tea for the color (tea colors are determined by drying process as well as by tannins).

Indian Almond Leaves (IAL) have had the most research done on their beneficial effects, Google 'peer-reviewed research indian almond leaves bettas' to find the most articles. 

Another way to get lots of tannins in your tank is to use Miracle Gro organic potting soil. 

It has lots of mulch that has been dried, chipped, and added to the soil to slowly decompose. The tannins will turn the water red in the first week, and it slowly gets darker.

I like to cap it with blasting sand, and my Malaysian trumpet snails like to mix the sand and the dirt together 🤦‍♂️

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On 9/18/2021 at 11:57 PM, Odd Duck said:

Maple will have some tannins, but not as much as oak leaves, Indian almond leaves (IAL), alder cones, the Rooibos tea, etc.  Fruitwoods typically have fairly minimal tannins compared to oak, etc.  I’m no expert in this category, but tannins aren’t found in flowers, for the most part.  Lots of herbal teas are made from the flowers of plants (3 different ones in the tea you listed).  Several of the herbs in that tea have organic compounds, but not all organic compounds are tannins.

I don’t know if rose bush leaves will have tannins but I doubt they have much.  Rose leaves are edible and most leaves that are rich in tannins are not considered good to eat since they are quite astringent and even bitter.  Consuming too much tannins can even cause health problems in people.

Most any wood will have some tannins, as @Nooby said.  Whether they are considered a significant source of tannins is another matter.  Cholla doesn’t seem to have huge amounts, but the water will turn a medium brown if you boil it.  For me, it doesn’t turn the water brown if you just soak it in room temp water or put it in the tank.

Mopani wood usually releases a significant amount of tannins and just putting it in your tank will darken the water.  Boiling it will usually give you very dark water which can be used to make a black water tank or used as a water treatment for certain situations.

When we typically think of “tea” we think of leaves and buds from the Camellia sinensis plant, but a “tea” can be made from almost any plant when you look at how herbalists think of “teas”.  It just means that the leaves (of whatever plant) have been steeped in hot water to release whatever compounds they may contain.  Whether those compounds are tannins, dyes, or poisons depends on the plant, berry, or even mushroom used.

Most anything that’s a tea that is safe for people to consume is fairly likely to be safe for our fish, but it may not accomplish what you’re looking for in this situation.

 

On 9/19/2021 at 12:56 AM, Torrey said:

@Wellxam I wouldn't use the herbal sleepy time because aromatic oils left in the spearmint and in the lemongrass can harm your fish.

A rule of harvesting plants / woods for tanks that I was taught (back in the 70's when I started this hobby😅) was fish gills are sensitive, and if I can smell it then it's damaging the gills.

While a lot of "canon" from when I first started has been disproven, even aquariumscience dot org says when collecting woods for the aquarium, don't use any that still have the smell (yes, even pines and junipers and cedars can be used, as long as they are not rotted and are not sappy).

I read an article about not using watermint in tanks with fish, for the same reason as not using sappy wood in tanks: the turpenes, pinenes and other aromatic plant oils can damage the gills. Kind of like putting a q-tip with a minute amount of essential oil on it up your nose: it will burn.

Many aquarists will use roobio tea for the color (tea colors are determined by drying process as well as by tannins).

Indian Almond Leaves (IAL) have had the most research done on their beneficial effects, Google 'peer-reviewed research indian almond leaves bettas' to find the most articles. 

Another way to get lots of tannins in your tank is to use Miracle Gro organic potting soil. 

It has lots of mulch that has been dried, chipped, and added to the soil to slowly decompose. The tannins will turn the water red in the first week, and it slowly gets darker.

I like to cap it with blasting sand, and my Malaysian trumpet snails like to mix the sand and the dirt together 🤦‍♂️

@Odd Duck @Torrey thank you for your time and in-depth posts, this gives me a lot to look into, and think about!

 

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