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Pests in the Fishroom


Tihshho
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Your tanks likely radiate heat and humidity, many "pest" spiders enjoy damp dark places. I usually just let them setup shop, that and my cats like eating them. It's something that will likely never go away especially as fall approaches.

 

I'd worry more about silverfish or ants, pests that can actually cause damage, than spiders. Who are just unsightly to some more than anything.

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Having spiders is actually a good thing in a home. They eat other “pests.” In my home, whenever I see a spider, I leave them alone because they are usually dining on flies, mosquitos, roaches, fruitflies, gnats, mites, and the occasional escapee cricket. I also am an avid Tarantula keeper, so I may be bias. In Florida, roaches are a problem, regardless of the level of cleanliness in the home. Hence, I consider them my 8 legged friends. 

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Well I'm in the Mid Atlantic. The only bugs I see in the house are spiders, the hibernating ladybugs in the winter, and the annoying stinkbugs that come in for the winter as well 🙄

I know they have a place in the whole ecosystem, as well as keeping control of bugs in the house, but having your equipment covered in webs constantly, as well as having a 4" wolf spider shoot out at you from out of no where isn't the most fun experience when spiders are not your thing, haha. 

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@Tihshho That is totally understandable. Wolf spiders can be quite intimidating. Let me pose this to you, you may not see many insects because of your geography, however if the spiders live there then they are feeding on something. Whether or not, it’s worth it to you to have them around is a different story. I do know that if you destroy any spiders webbing, but do not get rid of the spider, they will definitely start up another web. If I were closer, I’d come catch them for you. It’s not as difficult as you may think, however a calm, steady hand is required. If not, the risk of being bit isn’t worth it. If you’d like to eliminate via catching methods, I can explain. If not, I don’t want to highjack the thread with useless info on this forum. I hope this helps. 

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In my experience spiders don't need a food source in your house to come in, but certain situations in room can make that room more likely to see spiders. Also personally I remove spiders from my home when I see them, I've never seen one capture a bug inside my home and even if they were I would see this as my home losing the battle of separating the outside from the inside.

Things I have learned from owning an old house. Spiders and bugs in general are attracted to humidity, when squeezing into your home they will sense the higher humidity air and go that way. Reducing the humidity in your fish room may help reduce bugs. Spraying your foundation or where you suspect the pests are getting in with repellent will help too.

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On 9/1/2021 at 7:52 AM, Manny said:

I do know that if you destroy any spiders webbing, but do not get rid of the spider, they will definitely start up another web. 

So some species if I see the spider I catch them and relocate them. I've stumbled upon a few that look like brown recluse, and well... I dispose of those for an obvious reason. In some cases I see a web built, but there is never a tenant, and more often than not, those webs are near the lights.

On 9/1/2021 at 8:50 AM, TheDukeAnumber1 said:

Reducing the humidity in your fish room may help reduce bugs. Spraying your foundation or where you suspect the pests are getting in with repellent will help too.

The room has its own dehumidifier and I run other dehumidifiers in the basement. I run the one in the fishroom at max, and generally that keeps the room in the low 30% humidity. 

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On 9/1/2021 at 8:41 AM, Tihshho said:

The room has its own dehumidifier and I run other dehumidifiers in the basement. I run the one in the fishroom at max, and generally that keeps the room in the low 30% humidity. 

You're on top of the humidity then. Since you consistently have spiders they probably have an a path into that room that is very attractive to them for whatever reason. All you can do is try to disrupt that path either physically by sealing it off or by spraying repellants. I guess the other more work option would be to try and change the ecosystem outdoors. I.E. if you have landscaping that holds water and or attracts bugs and spiders change it to be a less attractive spot for insects.

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Brown recluses, like black widow are extremely timid spiders. They rarely bite and if they do it's almost always a female protecting her nest.

 

There are also many look alike spiders like the funnel weaver and mouse spider. I have been bit by a half dollar sized female wolf spider, while it was more of a shock then anything it didnt even break the skin.

 

In the Seattle area having a basement means having a billion spiders, and none of the repellants work. Unfortunately you may just have to physically remove them individually. But they are removing other pest species. I understand the phobia though.

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