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Fresh water clams


TankofFish
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As I was hunting for drift  wood last weekend I  was finding a gold shell looking clam. I'm think I might go back and get some to put in one of my tanks.

I have read they do well in help keeping the water filter ( filter feeders and eat particles from the water) , not sure if true or not but I think I will find out.

I'm still reading up on them though....

any info yall would like to share would be great

 

 

Edited by TankofFish
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I don’t know a lot about freshwater clams, but I’ve heard that they can be a ticking time bomb because when they die, you won’t notice right away and they’ll release ammonia (as dead aquatic animals do) and that ammonia spike can be detrimental to your fish if not caught in time.

Dont let that completely dissuade you, just be sure to do a lot of research. And like I said, I haven’t really looked into them myself.

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On 8/10/2021 at 1:14 AM, Steph’s Fish and Plants said:

I don’t know a lot about freshwater clams, but I’ve heard that they can be a ticking time bomb because when they die, you won’t notice right away and they’ll release ammonia (as dead aquatic animals do) and that ammonia spike can be detrimental to your fish if not caught in time.

Dont let that completely dissuade you, just be sure to do a lot of research. And like I said, I haven’t really looked into them myself.

the ticking time time bomb does not worry me, its what I read when they reproduce that has pretty much stopped me cold turkey. One mature clam can lay thousands of eggs from what I'm reading

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this is a copy and past from another sight

 

Corbicula cause the most problems in private ponds of any mussel found in the United States. They have been in North America since the early 1900s when they arrived from Asia likely in the ballast of ships, although there is some evidence that they were intentionally released.

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I kept freshwater clams in my water garden once, but it's been years ago. Knowing if they're dead or alive is a challenge. In a water garden or pond setting a dead clam isn't a big issue. In a fish tank it can be. Given their reproduction rate, they'd be handy to keep if you were raising a Mbu puffer. The costs of feeding those guys can be onerous, so raising your own food would be wise.

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Daniel;

Thanks, I needed to see that, I've never even heard of freshwater clams until I read the post, but I do know that there are several species of Mussels native to the US, and two that are invasive and they are all filter feeders. Since marine clams (Geoducks for one) are filter feeders, I thought freshwater clams probably were also.

Sincerely

Gator

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Clams, Scallops, and Oysters don't need a current to be filter feeders, why should Mussels?

The Geoduck of Puget Sound has a long feeding tube that extends above the mud at high tide, this is how they suck in their food, they create their own current.

I've never eaten a Geoduck and I never will. I grew up eating Clams, Scallops, and Oysters, I liked them, and I would have eaten Geoducks in '98 when I was in Olympia, WA., except that in '94 or '95 a Hurricane dumped so much rain on Mobile, AL., that several sewage treatment facilities were swamped and overtopped dumping raw sewage into Mobile Bay. There are so many Oysters in Mobile Bay that within 24 hours after the event, Mobile Bay was as clean as if there had never been any raw sewage in the bay, I haven't eaten a Clam, Scallop, or Oyster since. 

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On 8/9/2021 at 10:29 PM, TankofFish said:

this is the link I'm reading from and I'm 90% sure its the clams I'm talking about 

Golden Freshwater Clam (aquaticcommunity.com)

Invasive species in North America and EU...My suspicion is that their nymphs and babies are probably strong enough/protected enough to potentially survive a trip through a municipal sewer and into a freshwater outfall,  so I personally would be really thoughtful about where/how I would dispose of water from changes in tanks where these guys are being kept.

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On 8/18/2021 at 3:37 PM, NanoNano said:

Invasive species in North America and EU...My suspicion is that their nymphs and babies are probably strong enough/protected enough to potentially survive a trip through a municipal sewer and into a freshwater outfall,  so I personally would be really thoughtful about where/how I would dispose of water from changes in tanks where these guys are being kept.

no need to worry they are not going in my tank

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On 8/18/2021 at 8:12 PM, TankofFish said:

no need to worry they are not going in my tank

 

Not directed specifically at you 🙂.  As a resident of "the murder hornet state" it was more general thinking out loud that as hobbyists we all need to be thoughtful about and responsible for the role we might play in spreading invasive species. 

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