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9 minutes ago, DaveSamsell said:

@Daniel, was just curious, ever any problems with the cats picking up internal parasites, or other ailments, from the fish?  

Not all of my fish are 'pining for the fjords' at the time my cats eat them. I don't run tops on my tanks and was always amazed at how few jumpers I noticed.

But then there was that time that my jungle val turned in a jumper

And it was then I connected the dots.

But to answer your question, no internal parasite transmission from fish to cat that I am aware of.

My cats (all indoor cats) manage to eat skinks, honey bees, crickets, green beans, garlic and plastic wrap. I have been especially concerned about the garlic and the plastic wrap, but it is possible the cats were self medicating against the internal parasites as it seems to have worked.

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2 hours ago, TheDukeAnumber1 said:

I haven't kept many "wet pet fish" but the ones I have I've made sure to keep some photos saved and organized.

@Cory

When things are settled at the new place will Hank get his final resting place there?

 

That's the hope. Finally plant the maple tree and Hank. 

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Speaking of parasites and illnesses, one topic that came up in this discussion on the other page was the ethics of flushing dead fish.  From my childhood this was always the m.o., and I had never heard anything otherwise, but over there, there were some people getting angry about flushing fish.  I personally can't imagine any diseases or parasites living through the water reclamation process, but I'd love to hear other's thoughts.

 

Side note: the best answer I heard on there was building the dead fish a raft out of toothpicks, floating him in the middle of the tank and giving him a mini viking funeral pyre. 

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19 minutes ago, ADMWNDSR83 said:

Speaking of parasites and illnesses, one topic that came up in this discussion on the other page was the ethics of flushing dead fish.  From my childhood this was always the m.o., and I had never heard anything otherwise, but over there, there were some people getting angry about flushing fish.  I personally can't imagine any diseases or parasites living through the water reclamation process, but I'd love to hear other's thoughts.

 

Side note: the best answer I heard on there was building the dead fish a raft out of toothpicks, floating him in the middle of the tank and giving him a mini viking funeral pyre. 

That is, assuming the water is treated, which it is most (but not all) of the time

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Man, I got slated on that thread for saying I put my smaller fish in the trash or feed them to my dogs/cats. Where my larger more important fish to me get burried. Even some of my more lovable guppies. Some of the replies couldn't get over how I value some fish more than others. "All fish are equal" apparently I have to have the same affection for my Oscar as I do a random neon tetra. 

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We have a septic tank and leech bed, so i have not flushed any fish. I've always heard there is a chance the fish could harm the bacteria in the tank, so I just didn't chance it.

Instead I have just wrapped them in a piece of tissue paper and threw them away. So far it's only been a few guppies though. I might do something different if I ever get a larger fish.

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3 minutes ago, Pekitivey said:

Man, I got slated on that thread for saying I put my smaller fish in the trash or feed them to my dogs/cats. Where my larger more important fish to me get burried. Even some of my more lovable guppies. Some of the replies couldn't get over how I value some fish more than others. "All fish are equal" apparently I have to have the same affection for my Oscar as I do a random neon tetra. 

THAT'S why the co-op is better than You Tube

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As bacteria in the soil decompose our ex-fish, potassium, phosphorus, etc. become ionized and are taken up strongly by the soil. As part of the nutrient uptake process nutrients are depleted by the roots in the zone closest to the roots, a concentration gradient between the soil over to the root zone develops and allows for a diffusion of these ions to the roots of the tomato plant.

Fortunately, during this process the fishy odor, trimethylamine (N(CH3)3) is released as a gas and is not available to the tomatoes as part of the nutrient uptake process.

So although your garden may smell fishy, your tomatoes will not taste fishy.

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