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Which shrimp is least sensitive to water changes?


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Also have Cherries, haven't lost a single one of them but lost other. The Cherries are multiplying like rabbits, 2-3 weeks ago I announced gladly to the Mrs. that we have 4-5 baby shrimps...I have stopped counting, the number grows daily.

My PH is 8 and I usually carry ~ 40% water change every 2 weeks, my problem is how to clean the substrate without sucking the little shrimps.

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My rule of thumb that I used is not to exceed 5% - 10% for water changes for 1st and 2nd generation.  At 3rd generation and beyond, I will often do 30%-50% if I need to.   If you are running a shrimp only tank that is planted, often the parameters remain so pristine that water changes are often done just for the sake of water changes.  

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I have a tons of different color neo’s They thrive to over 100. I gravel vac and do large water changes. I also do 10-20% daily to keep up with a hoard of snails and 2 pleco. Key is to not let gh/kh/tds fall then do change. Keeping it stable inside by not going to long between changes. Also snails poo out amazing stuff that make shrimp gut health fantastic including bacteria that is highly beneficial. I personally do not know anyone who has a thriving shrimp population without snails. 

Edited by Guppysnail
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On 7/18/2021 at 12:11 PM, Zoidar said:

I have cherries, sometimes they die after water change. I have heard cherries are quite hardy, but are there other shrimps that are less sensitive to water changes?

I have the same bad luck with Cherries...I think *a lot* of the resiliency (or lack there of) of any strain of Neo shrimp has to do with the stock that they've been bred from,  so going with seller with a good reputation and who has raised their stock in water parameters as close to yours as possible is worth any extra $ it may run you.

Edit- One thing in addition to chlorine, PH, TDS, etc. to keep an eye on is the temperature of your new water when you do a water change with your shrimp.  It can be difficult to keep temperatures consistent out of the tap.  I've had shrimp heed to call to shrimp heaven when they decided to meander in to a stream of new water that was probably only 4-5 degrees cooler that the existing the tank water.

Edited by NanoNano
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I've kept and bred neos for several years, all different colors, never lost any to water changes that I know of or have seen. My shrimp tanks have quite a bit of plants in them, and sponge filters. I only do a roughly 10% water change on the shrimp tanks every two weeks, and make sure water going in is within a couple degrees of the tank.

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If you don't mind less colorful appearance, ghost shrimp can be very hardy.  Mine don't care about anything. They have been living in a forgotten bottle of dirty tank water; in a quarantine tank with medications; in a fry tank with daily 50% water changes - no problem whatsoever. (This does not necessarily apply to any random ghost shrimp though, I might just be lucky to have a particularly tough variety.)

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On 7/18/2021 at 7:22 PM, NanoNano said:

I have the same bad luck with Cherries...I think *a lot* of the resiliency (or lack there of) of any strain of Neo shrimp has to do with the stock that they've been bred from,  so going with seller with a good reputation and who has raised their stock in water parameters as close to yours as possible is worth any extra $ it may run you.

Edit- One thing in addition to chlorine, PH, TDS, etc. to keep an eye on is the temperature of your new water when you do a water change with your shrimp.  It can be difficult to keep temperatures consistent out of the tap.  I've had shrimp heed to call to shrimp heaven when they decided to meander in to a stream of new water that was probably only 4-5 degrees cooler that the existing the tank water.

I think I may have hurt some of my cherries because of the water temperature. My problem is the opposite of most. Dang tap water in Florida can be as high as 86 degrees on “cold” this time of year. Rarely below mid to low 70s other times. All my tanks rise in temp nearly 2 degrees from a 20% change.

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On 7/20/2021 at 11:58 PM, The Goatee said:

I think I may have hurt some of my cherries because of the water temperature. My problem is the opposite of most. Dang tap water in Florida can be as high as 86 degrees on “cold” this time of year. Rarely below mid to low 70s other times. All my tanks rise in temp nearly 2 degrees from a 20% change.

You might need to collect some water ahead of time and put in a place that's cooler (I assume your house is air conditioned since you're in Florida).

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Posted (edited)
On 7/21/2021 at 1:35 AM, RonBFree said:

I am breeding 6 different colors of neo shrimp.  I change 10-20% of water every couple weeks to keep nitrates at reasonable level.  I have never felt water changes affected mortality.

I wonder why I have this problem. I normally don't do more than 10-15% water change. Something wrong with my tapwater maybe? Dechlorinator can't be a problem, can it?

Edited by Zoidar
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On 7/21/2021 at 12:58 AM, The Goatee said:

I think I may have hurt some of my cherries because of the water temperature. My problem is the opposite of most. Dang tap water in Florida can be as high as 86 degrees on “cold” this time of year. Rarely below mid to low 70s other times. All my tanks rise in temp nearly 2 degrees from a 20% change.

I freeze bottled water just for this. Drop a few frozen bottles in a bucket of conditioned tap it brings temp down quickly without altering chemistry or waiting forever

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One other thing to investigate is if/how your tap water changes at different points in the year.  In my area we get river drawn water (high elevation snow melt) and/or ground water depending on the time of year/demand.  Many places are at record low water levels and summer almost always brings algae/bacteriological blooms that both naturally change water chemistry as well as require man made treatments that artificially change water chemistry.  

You may want to try emailing your local public utility.  The head chemist/quality person at my local utility is super knowledgeable and jumps at any opportunity to talk about water. 

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  • 3 months later...

Hi guys! Just an update. I think I have found why shrimp died after water change. I used both hot and cold tapwater to get the right temp. Now I only use cold tapwater that I then warm. Seemingly there must be some copper in my hot water. I haven't checked it for copper, but that must be it, since I haven't seen one dead shrimp since I changed method.

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On 10/28/2021 at 3:53 PM, Zoidar said:

Hi guys! Just an update. I think I have found why shrimp died after water change. I used both hot and cold tapwater to get the right temp. Now I only use cold tapwater that I then warm. Seemingly there must be some copper in my hot water. I haven't checked it for copper, but that must be it, since I haven't seen one dead shrimp since I changed method.

This makes me want to test my water, hot and cold. 

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