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White dots everywhere... Help!


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I have been seeing these white little dots appear in my tank, and zI don't know what they are or where they are coming from. The only things I have in my tank are mollies, neon tetras, cory cats, a loach, an otto, and 3 (maybe 2) nerite snails. I would thinks they are from the nerite snails, but my tank is freshwater and I was told they don't lay in freshwater tanks. If any of you guys can identify, that would be helpful. Thanks!

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14 hours ago, skipper said:

Mine left a trail of them front and center on a brand new piece of mopani... 😒 and INSIDE my hob, no idea how she got in there. Fortunately she found her own way out.

I've read speculation that Nerites instinctually seek out driftwood to lay their eggs on as driftwood is the equivalent of "public transit" floating from freshwater (where the adults live) to brackish water (where the nymphs hatch and grow).  The eggs are *tough* to remove for the week or so after being laid.  After 5-7 days they become soft enough to dislodge with a flat blunt object (I use chopsticks as they're less prone to gouge decor).  Dislodged eggs will sink to the substrate and degrade in a day to two. After removing the egg, there will still be a "ring" of adhesive that gets left behind...this can be nearly impossible to remove on some surfaces.  I've found that other species of snails and shrimp will dislodge it,  but it can take somewhere between days and months for the rings to totally disappear.

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34 minutes ago, NanoNano said:

I've read speculation that Nerites instinctually seek out driftwood to lay their eggs on as driftwood is the equivalent of "public transit" floating from freshwater (where the adults live) to brackish water (where the nymphs hatch and grow).  The eggs are *tough* to remove for the week or so after being laid.  After 5-7 days they become soft enough to dislodge with a flat blunt object (I use chopsticks as they're less prone to gouge decor).  Dislodged eggs will sink to the substrate and degrade in a day to two. After removing the egg, there will still be a "ring" of adhesive that gets left behind...this can be nearly impossible to remove on some surfaces.  I've found that other species of snails and shrimp will dislodge it,  but it can take somewhere between days and months for the rings to totally disappear.

mine seem to like to lay their eggs on rocks most of all.

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Nerites eggs... the only down side to having them imo. I have a couple of them in my 33 gal. I believe only one is female because I don't get that many eggs. The first time she laid on the backside of a large rock so they weren't visible from the front of the tank - I was happy about that! Next couple of times she sought out the largest piece of driftwood. I was able to dislodge with end of planting tweezers but I like the chopstick idea @NanoNano! I'll give that a try since I noticed a few more "seasame seeds" on the wood today. 

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Posted (edited)

I think I have 15ish Nerites spread across several tanks.  My experience has been that they will suddenly lay eggs (sometimes prolifically) and then just as suddenly stop of long periods of time- sometimes for the rest of their lives.  One thing that I'm suspicious of is if it might be related to variances in the availability of food- I've noticed that many Nerites will start to lay eggs either shortly after I've purchased them (more food- they're suddenly not competing for food with 20 other snails in a tank at the store) or if one of my tanks becomes especially clean (no food).  In the tanks where I have Neo shrimp (that I give supplemental food to every 2-3 days) and Nerites,  I notice fewer eggs/less laying.  Obviously same water, same tanks, same basic care routines,  so it could be specific to "me" or just a coincidence.

Edited by NanoNano
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Posted (edited)

Admins struck my last post on this,  so I''l try to make my point another way.  

Multiple Aquarium Co-Op videos feature the extensive quarantining efforts that they go through when they receive new fish/snails/shimp.   Buying and then returning fish (or snails) should at best force them back into several weeks of quarantine (not great time spent for creatures with short life spans) and at worst (which I've seen happen at the chains that shall not be named),  puts them unmedicated directly back in the tank with other existing stock to be sold....ready to potentially pass on the pathogens of their last home to anyone that buys anything from that tank.  Please be thoughtful about the creatures you buy...if you don't think you can handle some of their behaviors,  they might not be right for you.

Edited by NanoNano
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