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Accessibility in the hobby


clovenpine

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TL;DR: I've been thinking recently about accessibility in the hobby and I haven't found much information out there. I'd love to hear your ideas, tips and tricks, and thoughts about how to make the hobby more accessible to people with disabilities.

Personally, I'm colorblind (not a protected class, but a total pita when it comes to fishkeeping). Yes, I could spend hundreds to thousands on special glasses or aquarium monitoring systems that eliminate color-reading problems, but that's not really possible for me. CoOp test strips have been a godsend for me! It's so much easier to ask someone to read one strip vs. several test tubes, and now I test ALL THE THINGS. This got me thinking about people with other disabilities or mobility impairments and what tips and tricks might me out there to make the hobby better for them. I'd love to hear others' experiences and advice, with an idea to maybe submit a blog post or article on the topic within the next year. 

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I've always thought about how much a disadvantage colorblind individuals have in this hobby. Especially with test strips and water testing kits like you mentioned. I myself am 100% disabled. I got out of the hobby when I joined the Marines in 2004, and I always wanted to get back into it except part of why I loved fishkeeping was the work, and the care involved. I didn't want to have someone help me or rely on others. I found the Python system my saving grace and was my avenue back into fishkeeping back in 2012 when I retired. No more buckets, 'unless  I'm cleaning media from my canister. I can handle lifting one 5gal bucket but not 6-7 I would need for a 30% on my largest tank. 

I was thinking of getting a wheeled sled for my canister like what you would find for large trashcans, but my tank its connected to is literally 10ft from my front door where I do the maintenance on it. Not really worth it in my opinion, but I bet others would like some wheel device to move theirs farther. 

I really like your topic, its a rare one and one not really talked about as much in the hobby. There are two major things in the hobby a fish keeper cant get away from. Color coded testing, and removing/replacing water which is 'heavy'. 

I suppose you could always get some digital ph readers, but from what I've seen they need recalibration all the time which could be annoying. I wonder if there are digital readers for the other elements nitrate/nitrite. 

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 I use a stainless steel food service cart for water changes. It's just big enough to hold a 5 gallon tote and move around without tipping over. I still have to lift the totes to get them on and off the cart, but I don't have to carry them all over the house. I use a power head with flexible hose to move the water from the totes to what ever tank I'm doing  water changes on. The cart has a small lip around the top so I can spill a little and not worry about getting it all over the floor.
 I have a power strip zip tied to the handle of the cart, and all my hoses and extra stuff goes on the shelves underneath. If I could change anything about the set up I'd have bigger wheels casters to make it easier to get over the door threshold out to the patio.

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This is a great idea for an article. I’m also disabled, though it’s from brain stem compression, so I have a collection of symptoms that doesn’t fit well into any particular box. My main limiting factor when it comes to fishkeeping is mental energy, with physical energy being a close second. And my energy is unpredictable, so keeping to a specific schedule is hard.

Mental energy can mean different things for different people, but for me, when I’m fatigued, any task that involves multiple steps is challenging. For instance, setting up brine shrimp. I’ve done it a hundred times, but it’s still daunting to think through and execute all the steps—finding the hatchery, finding the right length air tube, getting the air pump and lamp, getting a valve so I can control the air pump flow, oh that means I need another piece of tubing, do I have one the right length or do I need to cut a new length? Which of my tube fragments should I cut? Back to the kitchen for the scissors... Where am I going to set up the lamp, where’s the salt and the measuring spoon, how much salt do I need to add again? etc. It could take me 20 minutes to set up brine shrimp when I’m tired just because of how inefficient I am at making decisions and figuring out what to do next. And the likelihood I’ll make a mistake just skyrockets.

For me, Aquarium Coop’s focus on all things “easy” has been so incredibly helpful. Any step I can eliminate in any process makes the hobby more doable. Dosing Easy Green with the pump head, for example, rather than having to get out my designated pipette and measure. The test strips have been the best thing ever. I’m testing all the parameters all the time now, when before I could only manage an occasional test. Aquarium plants with low needs help keep my water clean and my fish healthy when I can’t do water changes. Just recently I knew my 55 gallon needed a water change, but it was a week before I had a day with enough energy left over to do it. So thank you @Cory and everyone who’s working to make this hobby easier. It makes a huge difference.

To add to the list of major limiting factors:

  1. Reading colors
  2. Physical lifting
  3. Reliability (Keeping on a schedule)
  4. Cost

I add cost to the list because many disabled people have a very limited income. I’m fortunate that my husband has a good-paying job and I can work about 10 hours a week. Many many people are not so lucky. That’s another thing about Aquarium Coop that I appreciate.

Reliability is a big one, too, and not just the day-to-day energy or pain variation. Some disabled people have weeks or months when they suddenly get really sick and can’t do anything. They may spend some of that time in the hospital, away from their fish entirely. And because it’s unpredictable, they don’t have time to set up a feeding schedule with the neighbor who knows nothing about fish. Or what happens when you have to have major surgery?

If local clubs wanted to help make the hobby more accessible, I think one of the most helpful things would be to have a group of people willing to step in for disabled fish keepers, or for anyone, really. Willing to come by to do a water change if you’re having a bad week, or take a batch of fry to raise if you suddenly can’t care for them. Experienced fish keepers know what questions to ask and can keep an eye out for problems. It is REALLY hard to ask for help because we already feel like a burden to everyone around us, but if there were fish keepers who were excited to help, that would be amazing. Because fish are so healing. Having nature in our homes and something to care for is a huge encouragement.

Edited by Hobbit
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  • 1 month later...

For some perspective, I'm a 62 year old, one-eyed, arthritic, hemophiliac with a replaced left knee, a nonunion fracture in my left femur that's held together with a plate and eight screws, hemophilic arthropathy in both ankles, osteoporosis, and more, so I have some experience with disabilities. I've been on and off crutches since I was two. I've been keeping fish forever.

Accessibility in the aquarium hobby is pretty good overall. Smaller tanks can be used when dealing with water change issues. In a five gallon nano-tank, a one gallon jug is a 20% water change. If you can't even manage a one gallon jug, you can just use a drinking glass several times a day to change out the water. For people in wheelchairs, most of the commercial tank stands are impractical, but a custom stand can be made fairly easily that would allow a wheelchair to slide in under a tank. You'd want to use lower tanks like a 20 long or a 40 breeder and the tank would need to be lower than is typical, but it would be very doable. Old school metal tank stands used 1" angle iron for the stand and a custom made stand for a tank using such materials could be made to perfectly suit a wheelchair user. Things like a HOB or heater could be moved to the front or side of the tank for better accessibility to a wheelchair user.

I think there's an over-reliance on water testing. If your fish are doing well, that's more important than some arbitrary number from a test kit. (Which may or may not be accurate.) Many/most fish stores will perform water tests for you and there are commercial water testing sites. (Expensive, but if you've got nothing else they can give you very accurate results.) Things like canister filters and sponge filters can go weeks between cleanings. 

In the past three years I've had a fifteen day hospital stay, two six day hospital stays, and a seven day hospital stay, and my fish have been fine when I've gotten back home to them despite nothing being done for that time. (The pond/bladder snails became food for the swordtails while I was gone but their population rebounded once food hit the tank and the swordtails had something else to eat.) It's a pretty good hobby if you've got a disability. Could some things be improved? Sure. But people with disabilities are pretty clever and adaptable and can make things work. 

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On 6/18/2021 at 9:12 AM, gardenman said:

For some perspective, I'm a 62 year old, one-eyed, arthritic, hemophiliac with a replaced left knee, a nonunion fracture in my left femur that's held together with a plate and eight screws, hemophilic arthropathy in both ankles, osteoporosis, and more, so I have some experience with disabilities. I've been on and off crutches since I was two. I've been keeping fish forever.

Accessibility in the aquarium hobby is pretty good overall. Smaller tanks can be used when dealing with water change issues. In a five gallon nano-tank, a one gallon jug is a 20% water change. If you can't even manage a one gallon jug, you can just use a drinking glass several times a day to change out the water. For people in wheelchairs, most of the commercial tank stands are impractical, but a custom stand can be made fairly easily that would allow a wheelchair to slide in under a tank. You'd want to use lower tanks like a 20 long or a 40 breeder and the tank would need to be lower than is typical, but it would be very doable. Old school metal tank stands used 1" angle iron for the stand and a custom made stand for a tank using such materials could be made to perfectly suit a wheelchair user. Things like a HOB or heater could be moved to the front or side of the tank for better accessibility to a wheelchair user.

I think there's an over-reliance on water testing. If your fish are doing well, that's more important than some arbitrary number from a test kit. (Which may or may not be accurate.) Many/most fish stores will perform water tests for you and there are commercial water testing sites. (Expensive, but if you've got nothing else they can give you very accurate results.) Things like canister filters and sponge filters can go weeks between cleanings. 

In the past three years I've had a fifteen day hospital stay, two six day hospital stays, and a seven day hospital stay, and my fish have been fine when I've gotten back home to them despite nothing being done for that time. (The pond/bladder snails became food for the swordtails while I was gone but their population rebounded once food hit the tank and the swordtails had something else to eat.) It's a pretty good hobby if you've got a disability. Could some things be improved? Sure. But people with disabilities are pretty clever and adaptable and can make things work. 

I know since my limitations have grown and with each new one I develop I become more adaptable.  My own ingenuity impresses me since pre limitations I was not creative or very adaptable.

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  • 10 months later...
On 5/16/2021 at 7:38 AM, clovenpine said:

Personally, I'm colorblind (not a protected class, but a total pita when it comes to fishkeeping).

I don't know if this is new but I found this....

I wish co-op had something like this available. Even someone who isn't colorblind it can be difficult to read these tests.

 

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I have a disability and various health problems. One thing I found is how much a walker with a seat can help with water changes. Not only is the walker helping me walk, but I can put the bucket on the seat. 

I like how @Hobbit talked about some mental health difficulties. I can relate.  The hobby has helped my mental health amazingly but depression and panic can still get in the way. I find it a way to practice dealing with these emotions and working through it. I'm much more likely to do something for my animals than for myself. If I have to work through a panic attack to get a water change done, I'm much better for it in many ways. I think when it comes to accessibility with mental health issues it's much more individual based than physical. It's about trying different things and finding what works for you. 

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My 17-year-old is severely physically disabled so as his Mom, and caregiver I handle maintenance and feeding.   My son gets to pick out what he wants in the tank and watch them.  We have the 29 gallon set up next to his hospital bed and a 3 gallon set up in his recreation room (which I will probably switch out to a 20 gallon tall soon).   If I had to change something it would be to find a lower stand for the 29 gallon so he could feed his own fish.   I tried when he had a 10 gallon.  I put the 10 gallon on a low solid wood end table but he couldn't get his wheelchair close enough to do it comfortably I would need something low that he can slide the wheelchair under a bit so his torso is close.   He needs to be close due to physical disability;  His arm movement range is severely limited  and he is not strong enough to raise his arms past his shoulders.   I would also need to adapt a feeding device so he could grip it properly.   I used to sprinkle some pellets in a toddler cup and do and hand over hand so he could drop the pellets in the water but I think he would get more out of it if I came up with a way that he could physically do it on his own.   

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On 4/25/2022 at 8:41 AM, Kathy F said:

If I had to change something it would be to find a lower stand for the 29 gallon so he could feed his own fish.

what is the stand you have now?  I wonder if there is someone who would be willing to make one for him that fits your needs.

On 4/25/2022 at 8:41 AM, Kathy F said:

 I would also need to adapt a feeding device so he could grip it properly.   I used to sprinkle some pellets in a toddler cup and do and hand over hand so he could drop the pellets in the water but I think he would get more out of it if I came up with a way that he could physically do it on his own.

What about the co-op squeeze bottle? Does that help with the method of feeding to make it a little easier?

Edited by nabokovfan87
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On 4/25/2022 at 8:41 AM, Kathy F said:

My 17-year-old is severely physically disabled so as his Mom, and caregiver I handle maintenance and feeding.   My son gets to pick out what he wants in the tank and watch them.  We have the 29 gallon set up next to his hospital bed and a 3 gallon set up in his recreation room (which I will probably switch out to a 20 gallon tall soon).   If I had to change something it would be to find a lower stand for the 29 gallon so he could feed his own fish.   I tried when he had a 10 gallon.  I put the 10 gallon on a low solid wood end table but he couldn't get his wheelchair close enough to do it comfortably I would need something low that he can slide the wheelchair under a bit so his torso is close.   He needs to be close due to physical disability;  His arm movement range is severely limited  and he is not strong enough to raise his arms past his shoulders.   I would also need to adapt a feeding device so he could grip it properly.   I used to sprinkle some pellets in a toddler cup and do and hand over hand so he could drop the pellets in the water but I think he would get more out of it if I came up with a way that he could physically do it on his own.   

What about a cinder blocks with a board across it. Then you paint the blocks and wood to stress it up to be inside. This tends to be pretty study once the tank weight is on it and can be made easily with custom heights. Can use the flat topper type blocks if 2 cinder blocks or 3 blocks is too high.

As for feeding, I'm not sure on the mobility of the hands, but would something like a battery powered pepper grinder work? You can load fish food into it and as you press the button it grinds the fish food and releases it slowly.

Another idea for feeding would be using an app with a timer with a fish food feeder.

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On 5/16/2021 at 8:38 AM, clovenpine said:

TL;DR: I've been thinking recently about accessibility in the hobby and I haven't found much information out there. I'd love to hear your ideas, tips and tricks, and thoughts about how to make the hobby more accessible to people with disabilities.

Personally, I'm colorblind (not a protected class, but a total pita when it comes to fishkeeping). Yes, I could spend hundreds to thousands on special glasses or aquarium monitoring systems that eliminate color-reading problems, but that's not really possible for me. CoOp test strips have been a godsend for me! It's so much easier to ask someone to read one strip vs. several test tubes, and now I test ALL THE THINGS. This got me thinking about people with other disabilities or mobility impairments and what tips and tricks might me out there to make the hobby better for them. I'd love to hear others' experiences and advice, with an idea to maybe submit a blog post or article on the topic within the next year. 

As someone who is sometimes contracted by responsible businesses to address accessibility, there has been a huge shift from when ADA and IDEA were initially passed in the US, and the degree of information available now. Decades of fish keeping, and only recently (like last 5 years) have significant conversations around accessibility in *any* aspects been getting traction... much less fish keeping.

Thank you TikTok, for normalizing these conversations!!!

Grew up with good friends who were color blind, reagents for chemistry class and aquarium tests are *not* accessible. If costs are prohibitive, still not accessible. In chemistry class (prior to ADA or IDEA being passed) my friend failed chemistry twice because the teacher didn't care about them being colorblind. They couldn't see the reagent color change? Should have taken a different class. (Teacher did NOT appreciate my reply of "can't think of a way to help a student? Maybe you should have taught another class, or better yet, not teach at all")

So, we have come a *long* way, and we have a lot further to go.

I help homeschool families (who seem to disproportionately represent ASD, ADHD, immune compromised, hearing, visual, mobility, dyslexic, dyscalulic, and other challenged & intentionally targeted communities) design science programs that build on strengths and offeer opportunities to develop strategies for overcoming obstacles.

Glad to hear the test strips are making your life easier! Another option is taking a photograph and using the gray scale on the Google photo app. Eliminate all color, and the gray scale can help identify the reading. 

20220425_235748.jpg.657bd1ed5468867648502b6550ee9ede.jpg

(Above, original version with full color)

 

20220426_000020.jpg.59bb40d834fdaa5847b6ead2d556d33d.jpg

Showing how to slide  the color, light, and pop to clarify the scale.

 

700888106_20220425_235748(1).jpg.8215b8b67e18f25ac00589cfb67f9129.jpg

 

Final product, where the scale can be measured and the reading just using the gray scale.

I didn't ask if you were R/G or full colorblind, generally reading the grayscale doesn't seem to be impacted either way. Would be a cool experiment to see how many tricolor & polychromatic  visualists find the grayscale easier to read, as well. For reference, the tissue paper is true white, that the strip is resting on.

For people with chemical sensitivities (like myself), using a separate tub and phytoremediation for dechlorination is a little more time consuming, yet also offers a whole new aspect to the hobby (see Streetwise's Indoor Wetplants, or several of the Wabi Suba threads for ways of making phytoremediation beautiful).

For chronically ill? Larger tanks with more stable water parameters need to be measured against pico and nano tanks which are easier to do water changes on. Which approach will best suit the individual?

Which is the bottom line to fish keeping, isn't it? Kind of what makes it the grand equalizer as a hobby?

Rich or poor, bipedal or not, polychromatic or monochromatic vision, HoH or hearing, we can all find accommodations and adjustments that allow us to more intuitively enjoy the hobby. 

 

 

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On 4/25/2022 at 9:41 AM, Kathy F said:

My 17-year-old is severely physically disabled so as his Mom, and caregiver I handle maintenance and feeding.   My son gets to pick out what he wants in the tank and watch them.  We have the 29 gallon set up next to his hospital bed and a 3 gallon set up in his recreation room (which I will probably switch out to a 20 gallon tall soon).   If I had to change something it would be to find a lower stand for the 29 gallon so he could feed his own fish.   I tried when he had a 10 gallon.  I put the 10 gallon on a low solid wood end table but he couldn't get his wheelchair close enough to do it comfortably I would need something low that he can slide the wheelchair under a bit so his torso is close.   He needs to be close due to physical disability;  His arm movement range is severely limited  and he is not strong enough to raise his arms past his shoulders.   I would also need to adapt a feeding device so he could grip it properly.   I used to sprinkle some pellets in a toddler cup and do and hand over hand so he could drop the pellets in the water but I think he would get more out of it if I came up with a way that he could physically do it on his own.   

What about a desk with a lower edged, shallower tank? Allow the closeness (chair accessibility) and also more engagement (lower edges so he can lean over, not have to lift arms as high, sturdy edge to help support arms). In my younger days I would have offered a custom build with thicker glass walls, and slit a waterline tube to use to slide on the rim to act as a cushion.

Having his own tank with some sturdy inhabitants may be enough of a challenge  to the desire for autonomy, to push through/past any externally motivated inhibitors/limitations (working with some of the kids I have worked with, I have been incredibly disappointed to hear from the kids some of the limitations they internalized from well-meaning health care professionals. Reading your response shows you don't leave room for many of those externally inserted barriers).

Cory's solution: boards on cinderblocks, can be incredibly effective at customizing "desk" height around the chair...as well as width to accommodate various wheel configurations.

Have you looked at Pampered Chef? They don't talk about it much, but most of their line is ergonomically designed to ease use for mobility challenged cooks. I haven't looked lately, but they used to have a salt grinder that was a matter of squeezing the "neck" to grind the salt and deposit it. Could easily be filled with a pelleted food, and a single squeeze with both hands would feed the tank. Only put in a week's supply at a time, to ensure no oveerfeeding, as well as prevent degradation of food quality?

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Hello from UK I have a few chronic health problems including a bad back and because of this I cannot maintain external canister filters.  Not a problem in my breeders I use large sponge filters, and in my larger 200litre community I run two internal filters.  Years ago I made my own version of the python, very successful for water changes. In my breeder room which is also my sewing room, I have a big comfy wheeled executive chair and tanks are at eye level when seated in this.  Most things areanageable.  It's very relaxing if I have a bad day to just recline and watch corys videos.

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On 4/25/2022 at 11:41 AM, Kathy F said:

My 17-year-old is severely physically disabled so as his Mom, and caregiver I handle maintenance and feeding.   My son gets to pick out what he wants in the tank and watch them.  We have the 29 gallon set up next to his hospital bed and a 3 gallon set up in his recreation room (which I will probably switch out to a 20 gallon tall soon).   If I had to change something it would be to find a lower stand for the 29 gallon so he could feed his own fish.   I tried when he had a 10 gallon.  I put the 10 gallon on a low solid wood end table but he couldn't get his wheelchair close enough to do it comfortably I would need something low that he can slide the wheelchair under a bit so his torso is close.   He needs to be close due to physical disability;  His arm movement range is severely limited  and he is not strong enough to raise his arms past his shoulders.   I would also need to adapt a feeding device so he could grip it properly.   I used to sprinkle some pellets in a toddler cup and do and hand over hand so he could drop the pellets in the water but I think he would get more out of it if I came up with a way that he could physically do it on his own.   

Height is a big issue for you. You might want to consider something like a frag tank instead of a 29-gallon or 20-high tank. They're shallow tanks to allow greater light penetration for growing corals but can be used for fish also.  Most are only 12" or less deep, which could be good for your son. Fish like rice fish are specifically bred to be viewed from the top down. Some goldfish like the celestials are also bred to be viewed from the top. 

If your house is big enough (most aren't) you could get a fairly large frag tank and have it accessible from every side. If you buy a new frag tank, you'll spend a lot and most of us with disabilities aren't flush with cash but if you reach out to your community you might just find someone with one sitting in a basement or garage that they'll gift to you. There are probably more unused tanks in garages and basements than there are holding fish these days. The reef hobby tends to disappoint a lot of people over time, and they abandon the hobby and park their old tanks in the garage or basement.

Making your own frag-type tank isn't impossible if you're only going to use it from a top down perspective. If you go to a Home Depot or Lowes and buy a 2'X4' piece of 3/4" plywood (Birch plywood in this size at Lowes is around $34) and then add a 2X8X12' (about $25 for fir at Lowes) you could build the structure for a pretty low price. You're at about $60 for the lumber. I'd cut the 2X8 into two four-foot-long pieces and two pieces about 21 inches depending on the thickness of the 2X8. They should be 1.5" but they vary. I'd put some construction adhesive on the 4' long side of the plywood and then screw up through the plywood into the 2X8 with some 2 inch or longer screws every six inches or so. Do that on both of the four-foot sides then fill in the ends with custom cut pieces to just fit the space, once again glued and screwed in place with screw also going in through the 4' long pieces of 2X8 into the ends of the shorter pieces. Add a liner (pond liner or similar) and you've got a nice 7.5 inch deep 2'X4' foot frag type tank that would hold about 30 gallons. (45" X 21" X 7.5".) Your total cost would likely be under $100 and you'd have a neat top-down viewing tank that he should be able to work in.

An easier/cheaper alternative would be one of the Sterilite or Rubbermaid type of shallow plastic storage boxes made for underbed storage. They'd be shallow enough that he could easily reach over the top to feed the fish and provide some level of care for them. Fish don't really care all that much what they're in. If they've got food and good water they'll be happy.

Edited by gardenman
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@Torrey, I just tried your suggestion on using greyscale to read test strips... IT WORKS! I can test my own tanks now! I know it seems like a small thing, but it's a huge benefit for me. It's always felt vaguely embarrassing to ask my partner to read water tests for me. They say they don't mind, but they also don't have the same level of concern as I do. There's always that doubt in the back of my mind, "did they REALLY look? The colors are so close, what if they're wrong?"

New technology and accomodations mean so much more than making tasks easier to complete. They give folks a new level of control and confidence in their abilities. 

Thanks so, so much for your suggestion!

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I admit that I didn't have time this morning to read the thread in its entirety. I read a couple of longer posts and skimmed. If someone else mentioned it, I apologize, but it seems to me that the number 1 factor in increasing accessibility would have to be education. If you can teach someone how to set up a low maintenance system that suits their circumstances, they can succeed and enjoy the hobby for a long time.

Edit: I guess I shouldn't say that any one factor is thee number 1 factor.

Edited by BrettD
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On 4/27/2022 at 8:32 AM, clovenpine said:

@Torrey, I just tried your suggestion on using greyscale to read test strips... IT WORKS! I can test my own tanks now! I know it seems like a small thing, but it's a huge benefit for me. It's always felt vaguely embarrassing to ask my partner to read water tests for me. They say they don't mind, but they also don't have the same level of concern as I do. There's always that doubt in the back of my mind, "did they REALLY look? The colors are so close, what if they're wrong?"

New technology and accomodations mean so much more than making tasks easier to complete. They give folks a new level of control and confidence in their abilities. 

Thanks so, so much for your suggestion!

Accessibility is only "a small thing" for people who don't need the accommodation.

A lot of the workshops I facilitate center around de-centering "status quo norms" to be more inclusive, as inclusion (as opposed to tolerance) leads to better ideas. Differences make us stronger, not assimilation of everyone into the same mold.

I'm glad it works for you, nothing like being able to gain a little bit of independence a lot of other people take for granted.

On 4/26/2022 at 12:15 AM, Torrey said:

As someone who is sometimes contracted by responsible businesses to address accessibility, there has been a huge shift from when ADA and IDEA were initially passed in the US, and the degree of information available now. Decades of fish keeping, and only recently (like last 5 years) have significant conversations around accessibility in *any* aspects been getting traction... much less fish keeping.

Thank you TikTok, for normalizing these conversations!!!

Grew up with good friends who were color blind, reagents for chemistry class and aquarium tests are *not* accessible. If costs are prohibitive, still not accessible. In chemistry class (prior to ADA or IDEA being passed) my friend failed chemistry twice because the teacher didn't care about them being colorblind. They couldn't see the reagent color change? Should have taken a different class. (Teacher did NOT appreciate my reply of "can't think of a way to help a student? Maybe you should have taught another class, or better yet, not teach at all")

So, we have come a *long* way, and we have a lot further to go.

I help homeschool families (who seem to disproportionately represent ASD, ADHD, immune compromised, hearing, visual, mobility, dyslexic, dyscalulic, and other challenged & intentionally targeted communities) design science programs that build on strengths and offeer opportunities to develop strategies for overcoming obstacles.

Glad to hear the test strips are making your life easier! Another option is taking a photograph and using the gray scale on the Google photo app. Eliminate all color, and the gray scale can help identify the reading. 

20220425_235748.jpg.657bd1ed5468867648502b6550ee9ede.jpg

(Above, original version with full color)

 

20220426_000020.jpg.59bb40d834fdaa5847b6ead2d556d33d.jpg

Showing how to slide  the color, light, and pop to clarify the scale.

 

700888106_20220425_235748(1).jpg.8215b8b67e18f25ac00589cfb67f9129.jpg

 

Final product, where the scale can be measured and the reading just using the gray scale.

I didn't ask if you were R/G or full colorblind, generally reading the grayscale doesn't seem to be impacted either way. Would be a cool experiment to see how many tricolor & polychromatic  visualists find the grayscale easier to read, as well. For reference, the tissue paper is true white, that the strip is resting on.

For people with chemical sensitivities (like myself), using a separate tub and phytoremediation for dechlorination is a little more time consuming, yet also offers a whole new aspect to the hobby (see Streetwise's Indoor Wetplants, or several of the Wabi Suba threads for ways of making phytoremediation beautiful).

For chronically ill? Larger tanks with more stable water parameters need to be measured against pico and nano tanks which are easier to do water changes on. Which approach will best suit the individual?

Which is the bottom line to fish keeping, isn't it? Kind of what makes it the grand equalizer as a hobby?

Rich or poor, bipedal or not, polychromatic or monochromatic vision, HoH or hearing, we can all find accommodations and adjustments that allow us to more intuitively enjoy the hobby. 

 

 

I'm willing to bet this would also help folx like @Dean’s Fishroom who have commented on struggling to determine the slight variation in color on the pH and nitrites/nitrates, and not just people with mono- or dichromatic color blindness @clovenpine

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On 4/27/2022 at 9:36 PM, Guppysnail said:

@Torrey I cannot distinguish shades of light colors and hubby hates trying to read tests for me but does The coop strip helped a little.  The greyscale is awesome.  Now I need to learn how tech works so I can use it.🤷‍♀️

If you have a smart phone you can temporarily switch the entire phone to greyscale so you don’t have to convert every photo to greyscale before you can read it.

 

https://ting.com/blog/going-grayscale-ios-android-smartphone/

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On 4/27/2022 at 7:36 PM, Guppysnail said:

@Torrey I cannot distinguish shades of light colors and hubby hates trying to read tests for me but does The coop strip helped a little.  The greyscale is awesome.  Now I need to learn how tech works so I can use it.🤷‍♀️

On your iPhone (according to my sister) there's an editing option when you click on your pictures.

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