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About Me

Found 5 results

  1. MTS! Yeah, another tank found its way into my home today. will be a dedicated cherry shrimp set up.
  2. Hey all, At this time I've hit my maximum on aquarium realestate. I can't find a new spot to put an aquarium without driving the people I live with mad. At the same time, I'm also enjoying the fruits of breeding fish for profit, and I'd like to continue expanding that side of my hobby. My fish for profit tank is a 40B with a fancy strain of dumbo guppies that have been very prolific as well as some bristlenose plecos I've been growing out for a year that are on the cusp of sexual maturity. I'd like to add another strain of guppies to my profiteering set up, but I don't have room for even an extra ten gallon. So, my thinking is to either put a divider in the 40B or upgrade that 40B to a 55 I have sitting in storage with one or two dividers in that one. I've been eyeing the dividers that Flip Aquatics sells, thick sponges designed to keep shrimp strains from cross breeding. I figure if they're good enough to keep baby shrimp from crossing over, it might be good enough to keep two strains of guppies from crossing in the same tank. So, my questions for the forum are: What are your experiences with Flip Aquatics' tank divider? Can they be installed on a drained but not dry tank? Would they work with undergravel filters? Would they be effective in keeping fry from crossing over? Any alternatives to this product that would have a similar effect? Pictures of your setups would also be great. Thanks!
  3. Today on my commute home I out of the corner of my eye I spotted the corner of a 30 or 40 gallon storage tote barely sticking out of the brush on the side of the road - my brain immediately thought "FREE SUMMER TUB" After 2 u-turns on a 4 lane highway I pulled over in traffic to happily discover it was a heavy duty style and holding water....loaded it up....in true Alabama style I didn't even get one funny look from a passerby. I even had this sense of crazy urgency worried someone would beat me to it if I didnt get back to this barely visible tote in a matter of seconds.... All of this was not advisable behavior BTW 🙂
  4. 6 months into getting back into aquariums, I now have 5, plus a few small empties for "just in case" and wow do I need to slow down! But as I've set these tanks up, I find myself ordering the same things over and over again, or buying a bunch because I didn't realize I needed them, or so grateful I have one small thing. So here's what I'd recommend to anyone planning their second tank. Because more are on the way! Basic electrical equipment: Power strips, pick up a cheap pack of them when you're at a hardware store. Indoor extension cords. When do these NOT come in handy? Try to have an extra outlet timer on hand, but these are okay to buy when you get a tank set up. Basic water-moving equipment: At least one nice 3-gallon plastic bucket. Preferably one designed for aquariums since it'll have a lip and a grip for pouring and gallon measurements inside. I couldn't keep fish without one. Some basic 5-gallon buckets, preferably with lids, because you never know when you'll have to move a tank or need some emergency fish/plant storage. Also handy for rinsing gravel. A gravel siphon, preferably one size bigger than you think you'll need. Small ones can go so. slowly. Old towels Sponge filters & gear: Try to have at least 1 more small or nano air filter than you do tanks. Keep it cycled in your largest tank for quick QT set-up. Airstones, check valves, airline tubing, nano air pumps, airline control valves. They're all cheap, buy more than you think you'll need because when you need any of these things, you need them right away. Sponge filter media. Always good to have a pack or two extra of this stuff. An extra small or medium inlet filter sponge. You don't need em til you really need em, fast. Plant gear: Always throw in a pack of plant weights with your plant order from the Co-op. I swear my tanks are eating these things. Superglue gel. I use it for so much more than anchoring plants! Black cotton thread and/or fishing line. Fish gear: Get the quarantine trio! 100%, absolutely, even if you're not planning on getting new fish for awhile. The peace of mind to be able to handle most any common disease that comes up, when it comes up, is priceless. Have a QT with plastic plants/caves ready to go. I love Irene's advice for a clear plastic sterlite container with holes in the lid. Get a hang-on-tank specimen container, like what they use at fish stores. Best way to keep fish secure as you're transferring them between different tanks. At least 1 more 50w heater than you think you'll need. You never know when one will go, and it's good to have on hand for your QT. This is going to sound crazy, but: peacock feathers. I happen to have a bunch laying around because my cat loves to play with them. You can probably find them at most pet stores as cat toys or cheap on amazon. But they're so handy for gently poking at something at the bottom of your tank, like a flipped-over nerite snail, a leaf with some detritus to shake off, or a piece of decor that a dumb fish is stuck near. Emergency gear: silicone tank sealant. It may not hold for long, but if disaster strikes, it can hopefully hold long enough to rescue your livestock. Portable battery for nano air pump (and your phone!). Hand warmer packs. Thermal blanket(s). A few gallons of distilled water, always handy. Hang on to these: The little plastic coated twist ties that come with a lot of fish gear. These are super handy for securing sponge filter media to outlets that are too strong, other things that might be partially submerged or damp. Clean, large fish bags. Essential for cleaning sponge filters! Empty water jugs. I like to fill them directly from the gravel siphon hose, then keep them by my houseplants for when they're thirsty. Any interesting rocks or pieces of driftwood you see that could fit in a tank one day. Scrub em down with plain water. Things I surprisingly don't use that often: Rubber gloves. Try as I might to protect my poor hands and nails, they're just not fitted enough for stuff I need to do, and usually not long enough, either. Nitrile exam gloves. I use these all the time for any number of gross household or automotive jobs, but not with my aquariums. Extra large nets. All my fish are small, so the big one is just clumsy. Algae scraper. That's what my snails are for! I use it more often as a long stick to grab something that fell behind the tank. Any other gear that surprised you or that you wish you had in abundance as you got started?
  5. Howdy Nerms! Is this a common issue for us NERMs but do we start daydreaming our next project or upgrade as soon as we finish one? Don’t get me wrong I enjoy what I have accomplished but I start thinking about what is next. Does this happen to you? Many thanks, Tedrock Below I took down the 40 to build a 20 stand.
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