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About Me

  1. Hey yall, I wanted to keep the flow down as much as possible for my bettas, so I placed the airstone in the HOB. I was wondering if my setup is effective or if I should just put the airstone in the tank? I've never seen anyone do it so I'm guessing there must be a reason. Video of my setup
  2. Twin Wall 8mm Polycarbonate Sheet, Clear, Strong Impact and Shatterproof, All-Weather Outdoor Greenhouse Covering Thank you!
  3. This is a brief overview of the tools and techniques I've used to build three aquarium canopies this way. My intent with building a canopy is to block the glare from the lights and light spillage into the rooms. I also want enough room inside the canopy to be able to reach in the tanks if I have to without having to remove it. I use 1/2" Sande Plywood for a nice paintable surface while still being lightweight enough to lift on and off. It does require a moderate set of wood working tools and the knowledge to use them. I used the following. Tablesaw and Dado blade set Miter saw Kreg Pocket Screw Jig Drill To start I take measurements of the aquarium frame that'll determine the inside dimensions of the canopy. This is a 48x18, 90 gallon tank. I like the canopy to cover the black plastic frame of the tank. You could extend this lower to cover the water line as well. Once I determined the dimensions I use a tablesaw to rip the plywood to length. I like to start by assembling the front of the canopy where the doors are. I found a 10" tall opening was good for fitting my arm in and out of easily. I assembly the entire canopy using pocket screws drilled with a jig. I then make the sides of the canopy. I use a stack of dado blades to cut a groove in the sides. The groove will hold a strip of wood the will sit on top of the aquarium frame, holding it up in place. I screw the sides into the inside of the canopy front so that the cut edge will be hidden from the front view. I attach the back of the canopy the same way as the sides. I screwed the back panel on within the inside of the canopy so the side hides the edge of the back panel. At this time I glue in a strip of wood cut to a specific width to fit fully into the dado and extend out enough to sit on the rim of the aquarium frame. Take care not to make it too wide so you can get the glass lids on and off. Test fit confirms all is good to proceed. After that the top is the last major piece followed by fitting the doors. I found a 1/2" overlap on the doors is good. These are the hinges I use. Finally I attach some simple trim around the top to hide the edge of the top panel to give it a nice look. I painted with a semi-gloss black paint. I don't have any filter equipment running over the rim of this tank but you could trim out to allow access for filer tubes, HOBS, etc. I do plan on trimming a small access cutout on the back, for wires and airline, once I determine the light orientation. I'm no expert woodworker but I found this easy to make. May it serve as inspiration for you to design and build your own aquarium canopy instead of buying one.
  4. One of my guppies was getting close to giving birth and I didn't have a spot for the babies. Normally I just let them breed and give birth all in the same tank, but I had just gotten rid of most of the hornwort in the main tank, so I wanted to give them a better chance of survival. I threw this together and it worked out great! She gave birth to at least 6 babies this afternoon and I don't think any got eaten. Upside-down planters with rocks holding them down 😂
  5. This is the process I used for drilling my next display tank. Its a 90 gallon tank with 1/4" inch thick glass. I'm drilling to install bulkheads to attach a canister filter too. Drilling a tank isn't as scary as you think if you've never done it before. You just have to go slow and have confidence, once you start there is no going back. It is more difficult and more likely to break on thinner glass, 1/8" or less. The tools I used were: Power drill. I think a two speed drill is best. Used on the lowest setting so you can't go too fast. Drill guide. I like this one with the suction cup. It held really well and has a port to attach a water line too. Squeeze bottle & aquarium airline. The bottle is from Dollar Tree, while not water tight, a thick wrapping of Teflon tape around the threads solves that. I found the Marina blue airline fit onto the nipple of the drill guide the easiest and onto the squeeze bottle. Some flat scrapes of wood and toolbox drawer liner Glass drill bit (obviously). I used a 35mm bit for a 3/4" bulkhead. I didn't want to do it outside with a hose because it was cold and snowing out at the time. I drilled it in my kitchen without making a mess at all. I used the flat scrapes of wood to wedge inside the tank as a brace when drilling. It helps contain everything once you get through the glass and maybe helps prevent some chip out. I used the liner against the glass to prevent the wood from slipping and wedged the piece between them to hold it tight. Go time. I wrapped a towel around the guide to contain the glass dust slurry. I had someone help by squeezing the bottle at a steady rate while I was drilling. I used the lowest speed and set the drill's clutch to the drill setting. Use both hands to hold the drill and keep it as straight as possible. Don't push too hard, especially on thinner glass, hold the drill tight and push down lightly, let the drill bit do the work. It takes time to get through thick glass, just go slow. You'll feel less resistance as you get closer to punching through, ease up on the pressure at that point until you're all the way through. Once you're through the hard part is over, except getting the plug of glass out the bit. Prying with a screwdriver in the slots gets it out. Removing the guide I found very little mess. Easy clean up. You can see the toolbox liner twisted and caught the bit as it punched through. I think that is actually beneficial, like a soft stop/landing for the process. I re-positioned the setup exactly the same and drilled a second hole, also successful.
  6. Why did I never think of this before? Why are all the cabinet knobs in my house so boring? What would you choose for a tank stand (will attach picture if I'm smart enough)? I have community freshwater fish and shrimp, but I'm not averse to knobs outside of that. My husband built this beast of a stand for the new 29g that will replace the ancient 20hex. That's just paneling "skin" from Home Depot.
  7. I haven't even used this hatchery yet but I could see I wasn't going to like the stand. I was watching an old video of @cory talking about brine shrimp and he had this huge upside down pyramid shaped hatchery and he'd built a stand for it out of PCV pipe. I thought, that's a good idea and I'm sure I can do that. So here it is.
  8. I am curious what everyone uses for their fish tank that is not necessarily made for this hobby. Maybe it’s something from Amazon maybe you made your own specialty tool maybe it’s upcycled from the trash! Show me your favorite most used tool and tell me what it’s for! Mine is one of those forks they use in flower bouquets to hold the card. It’s great for poking around the tank or rolling my moss balls around when I don’t feel like sticking my hand in.
  9. I recently watched a video that KG Tropicals made showing a staggered aquarium rack for 6 - 10 Gallon Tanks (shown below) I was thinking of applying the same design for 2 - 55 gallon tanks in my basement fish room. Obviously it would need to be scaled up with 2x4s and changing the supporting. Plan was to have the top of the lower 55 be level with the bottom of the upper 55. that way you have plenty of access with each tank and are utilizing the space effectively. In essence it would basically be having a short 55 gallon stand and a tall 55 gallon stand that just happen to share some of the same supports Am I on the right track or is this a fool's errand?
  10. Just wanted to share my hand made aquarium stand. Made it myself in about 2 hours starting from rough lumber, then milling the pieces, onto assembling, and finally finishing it including sanding and painting the plywood top, as well as sanding and poly coated the entire build. I work in a woodshop and did this on my break over a couple of days. I made this specifically for viewing while laying/sitting on the floor 🙂 nothing special but it is made from dark walnut
  11. My Southern California water is hard, high-pH, and contains high quantities of chloramines. I have 13 tanks at last count. That's a lot of buckets to dechlorinate on water change day! About a year ago, I took the plunge and researched what it would take to pre-filter my tap water so that I could refill tanks directly, I'm really glad I did, because in the long run, it has saved me more hours than I can count! Thankfully, it's a lot easier than it might seem. Below I will walk through the steps the average household can take to set it up, to show how easy and effective it really is! Plan on a $100 total expense. (All links are non-affiliate) (I have ripped off illustrative pics from the internet. He had it coming.) (Apologies to our overseas friends; this is how I did it in the U.S.) I'm assuming you know how to connect push-fit quick-connectors: Push, then pull, then insert a blue clip. PARTS: 1. 2 x Clear filter housings for 10" x 2.5" filters: 1/4" ports ($28) (clear is useful to see how dirty the sediment filter is) 2. Sediment Filter Cartridge: 1 micron ($7) (you could get 5 micron, but at this cost, why?) 3. Chloramine Carbon Block Cartridge: 1 micron ($20) (this cartridge is overkill if you're only treating for chlorine) 4. RO Canister Wrench ($7) (must-have for opening/tightening canisters) 5. Threaded fittings for RO canister housings: 1/4" ($7) (this is a basic selection; you can get more fancy here: elbow, direct connection, etc.) 6. Water supply RO adapter ($11) (basic is generally fine) 7. 25'-50' of 1/4" RO hose ($9) (how much do you need to reach your tanks?) 8. Assorted RO hose fittings ($12) (buy them all; you'll use more than you think!) 9. Vaseline or silicone grease 10. Teflon tape. STEP 1: Tap into the Cold Water Supply Pick a room with running water. I used my kitchen sink because of its proximity to big tanks, but bathroom or laundry hookups will do. Right where the cold water supply feeds the faucet, you can easily install the adapter valve. To install, simply: 1. Place a towel under the cold water shut-off valve. 2. Turn off the cold water valve. 3. Disconnect the hose to the faucet. 4. Install the adapter (use teflon tape for the threads!). 5. Close the new adapter's valve. 6. Reattach the faucet hose. 7. Turn the water valve back on! Here's a not-very-helpful picture of my installation. I have a RO-drinking water unit, so I had a similar adapter already installed: I do not worry about water temperature when refilling my tanks. I can't prove it, but I've heard that a quick blast of cold water simulates a rainfall and can stimulate breeding and other behaviors. Otherwise I will lose gallons of water trying to get the mix just right every time. Maybe if I had a fish room, but for 13 tanks, cold water alone is just fine. I change 50% in every tank every weekend. STEP 2: Load the Canisters Each of the filter canisters has a black o-ring in its housing. You'll want to gently pry it out, coat it with some vaseline or silicone grease, and push it back in. You can then load the filter cartridges in each one and screw the housings into the lids. Use the wrench to tighten them. STEP 3: Connect the Filter Canister Tops An RO threaded fitting needs to be screwed in both ports on each of the two canisters. You must use teflon tape or you'll have leaks! Once closed up, you can use some RO tubing to connect them to your home water supply adapter. Take note of the "IN" and "OUT" markings on the lids. Run a short length of tubing from the new adapter on your plumbing to the "IN" port of the canister with the sediment filter. Then, run a very short tube from the "OUT" of that same canister to the "IN" of the canister with the carbon block. The remainder of your tubing can be attached to the "OUT" port of that second canister, and will hopefully reach your tanks. Be sure and put a ball valve (you bought several) on the end of the tubing to your tanks, so that you'll be able to turn it on and off at that point! STEP 4: Check for Leaks I had to do this several times until I had used enough teflon tape or vaseline grease on the o-rings. It's worth paying attention at this stage to save yourself grief later! I closed the valve on the very end of my tubing, and opened up all the others. I keep it in this state indefinitely. STEP 5: Flush out the Carbon Powder I ran my unit for about an hour into the sink, until the water came out with the lowest TDS and clarity. STEP 6: TEST! I have a chlorine test kit that measures total and free chlorine; this allows me to infer chloramine quantities when I compare with an ammonia test. None of this is necessary, in my opinion, except maybe for peace of mind. I found that water coming out of this unit tests at zero for chlorine, chloramine, and ammonia. I suppose maybe the ammonia could read as much as 0.25 ppm, but it's my opinion that it's not enough to hurt fish, and any bio filter will snap that up right away. STEP 7: USE IT! I keep all the valves open at all times, except for the one on the very end of the hose that goes in the tanks to refill. The water coming out of this unit is not high pressure; it runs about 1 gallon per minute for me. I prefer that. Now, I just uncoil my hose to any part of the house I need, and coil it back up under the cabinet when I'm done! Clean water from the tap! STEP 8: ADDITIONAL TIPS 1. You can drink it too. 🙂 Unless you're already drinking RO water, it's MUCH better filtered than that stuff that comes out of your fridge icemaker or Brita filter. 2. The hose is so small I can put a tiny hole in my wall and get it to a tank for a permanent installation: Think auto-water changing! 3. You can add stages to improve the filtering capabilities. For example: A 5 micron sediment filter before the 1 micron will increase the lifespan of the latter. I haven't needed this; at seven bucks I plan to change it once a year whether it needs it or not. If you just want to take care of chlorine and not chloramines, you can go for a less restrictive carbon filter, which will boost your water pressure. For more neutral water and low-pH applications, you can add an RO membrane or DI resin. And so on. 4. For filling my rack, I went nuts: Hope this has been helpful. Thanks for reading! Bill
  12. Hello Fellow Aquarists and Happy New Year! I am looking for a recommendations o a rack/holder to hold all tubes and solution bottles for water tests Any ideas will be appreciated... Thanks a lot!
  13. So... a pair of rams we want to trace out a genetic line from _finally_ spawned... a really small spawn... in the substrate! So, used a soup ladle to pull them. Kind of awkward, but there’s a few fertile ones that are beginning to wiggle! Hopefully we can raise up a batch.
  14. I am setting up my filtered fresh water system to my new multi-tank rack . Right now I am using a Senninger 25 PSI pressure reducer for 3/4" line pressure (about 50psi according to the gauge) to 1/4" irrigation lines running to the tank. At 25 PSI it is coming out way to fast unless I have multiple valves open. Only thing is I want the ability to fill just one tank at a time too. They also have 10 and 15 PSI reducers. I am interested if anyone has any experience or advice setting up these systems. Thanks in advance! My system (pressure reducers at bottom):
  15. I am looking for recommendations for heavy duty steel racks for 20 gallon aquariums for my fish room. looking for it to hold 4-5 tanks on each rack. Thanks!
  16. Can someone point me in the direction of how to diffuse the flow to not cause issues with a piston pump that functions with higher output then currently needed? Cory and group say the pump on coop is good for about 45 air lines. currently have about 10 and just going to do a loop and move forward, instead of changing later. thanks.
  17. I normally don't order lots of root tabs. I should; I have tons of plants that can use them. But they are more buoyant than anything I've ever seen in a aquarium, and it's really difficult to get them deep under the root of my plants (even with forceps) so that they'll stay there before the tablet casing begins to degrade! It sometimes takes me several minutes to deposit one tablet, and it's a task I really don't look forward to. When folks on this forum a couple weeks ago mentioned a very expensive, unavailable-to-the-US mechanism made just for this purpose, I hit the internets. But there was no way I could have something like this shipped to the US for less than $60! So I started researching the DIY route, and after some trial and error and lots of research, I've come up with this one-handed solution. It can be made for less than $10 in parts from your local Home Depot. In fact, you can make two for about the same cost! It is sized for Aquarium Co-Op Easy Root Tabs. PARTS: So let's dive in. These are the parts I collected together (non-affiliate links) : 1. Straight PEX Pipe: 1/4" ID, 5' length: $1.76 https://www.homedepot.com/p/Apollo-1-4-in-x-5-ft-White-PEX-Pipe-APPW514/301541226 2. Wood dowel: 3/16" diameter, 4' length: $0.70 https://www.homedepot.com/p/3-16-in-x-48-in-Wood-Round-Dowel-HDDH31648/204354369 3. Drawer pull: 1-1/14" birch cabinet knob: $0.98 https://www.homedepot.com/p/Liberty-Rowland-1-1-4-in-32-mm-Birch-Wood-Round-Cabinet-Knob-P10512H-BIR-C/204143998 4. Drawer pull: 1-13/16" birch cabinet knob: $1.88 https://www.homedepot.com/p/Liberty-Classic-1-13-16-in-46-mm-Unfinished-Birch-Wood-Round-Cabinet-Knob-P10515C-BIR-C5/100156480 5. Springs: 6-pack zinc-plated compression springs (used the 3/8" x 1-1/8" x 0.041" spring): $4.22 https://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-Zinc-Plated-Compression-Spring-6-Pack-16087/202045468 TOTAL: $9.54 TOOLS: 1. Drill and assorted bits 2. Wood glue (or white glue) 3. 5-minute epoxy PREP: The 1/4" PEX pipe does not fit the Easy Root tabs. I made it fit by enlarging the first inch or so of one end of the pipe using a 5/16" drill bit. Now, the smaller end of the Easy Root Tab fits very snugly. If I don't push it in too far, it's a perfect grip! Next, I cut a 12" length of the PEX pipe and a 13" length of the dowel. I don't have very deep tanks, so this is fine for me. But this can be cut to any length you need; just make sure the dowel is always one inch longer than the tube. The wooden knobs already have holes drilled in them, which made it very easy to enlarge them to exactly the diameters I needed. For the smaller knob, I enlarged the hole to 3/16", making sure not to drill all the way through. I glued in my wood dowel with a drop of wood glue to hold it permanently: For the larger knob, I enlarged the hole to 3/8" diameter, this time going all the way through. I made sure to start with a 3/16" bit, and repeatedly went larger and larger until I reached 3/8". This ensured my hole stayed centered and I had a nice clean cut all the way through. I glued in the length of PEX pipe with 5-minute epoxy. This should hold well enough for my purposes. I'm using the shorter, wider spring for this project (3/8" x 1-1/8" x 0.41"). For good measure, I used some 5-minute epoxy to glue the spring to my plunger. This is totally optional, but gives me one less piece I can lose. That's pretty much all there is to do. I just inserted the plunger in the tube and I'm ready to try it out! I placed an Easy Root Tab in the end, just far enough for it to grip, but not so far that it won't push out easily. I inserted the tool with one hand into the tank, pushed the plunger, and voila! A deposited tablet in 5 seconds! But I am over the moon about how this tool turned out. I just placed about 20 tabs in two minutes. Even with coarse gravel, forcing the pill in was no problem. The two pieces come apart for drying, as that wood dowel won't last forever. Now I understand why the professional ones are so expensive. This makes things so much easier. I'm definitely making a longer one for deeper tanks. Hope you find this useful. Thanks for reading! Bill
  18. So I am in the market for a stand for my new 40 gal breeder. Would you guys recommend buying one or making one? I would like to run a canister filter and hide it in the stand. Any suggestions? Trying not to spend a ton of money. thanks
  19. I too like others got tired of using the Ziss hatcher on the stand it comes with. I wanted something to hold them higher, be easy to use, and easy to get them in/out of. I also needed somewhere to mount the inkbird controllers, for the heaters, I want to use. I layed out all the equipment to get an idea of what to make. Someone on the forum mentioned 3/4" pvc tees fit perfectly over the hatchery handle. I can confirm that. I used 3/4" plywood and a kreg pocket screw jig to make a simple three sided frame to mount everything on. I drilled a hole in each side to run the power cords out of using some desk grommets for a clean look. To hold the light bulb in the center I drilled a 1-1/2" hole and mounted it also with pocket screws. I also used a router to smooth the sharp edges. To mount the pvc tees I drilled an 1/8" hole through. Then drilled out the outside hole to 1/4" to allow a screwdriver clearance to tighten the screws. I spray painted the pvc tees with Krylon Fusion. I painted the stand with semi gloss black latex paint. I mounted a power strip on the outside for everything to plug into. I added a switch to each heater to allow easy shut off for cleaning without having to unplug anything. The air pump hangs above on a hook out of the way. I run the air up through outlet as others have done. I use a piece of black corrugated plastic to block the light bulb so I'm not blinded. Underneath them I have dish drying mat to catch any water. What I like about this station is that I only have to unplug the power strip to be able to move the whole unit wherever I want.
  20. It has four walls now I can call it a fishroom right? What started earlier this year as a single rack of tanks, my nerm-side got the best of me. My desire to expand and add more tanks came from two things. That 40B is now a thriving Guppy colony and I'd like to try line breeding some of the color strains. The second thing was wanting to heat the room not, relying completely on individual heaters. Being in northern PA and the tanks being in the basement it can easily dip into the low the 60's (F) down there. I started in late September with the Dollar Per Gallon sale getting the tanks I wanted. Six 10s, two 20Hs, and two 5.5s. I like painting the bottoms black for a cleaner look. I prefer having bare bottom tanks for easier maintenance. I have also noticed less algae growth on the bottoms of the tanks that are painted black. I use Gloss Black Rust-oleum Enamel Paint. Next step was to enclose the area where the tanks are. They sit in a corner of my basement so I only have to make two walls. I like building simply and effectively to reach my goals. To enclose the tanks I made a framework using 1x2 furring strips and 1/2" styrofoam panels as insulation. After that I needed to move the 40B and the shelf it was on. I did that by draining it to about 3 inches of water. Lifting the shelf enough to get furniture sliders under each leg and sliding it out of the way. I used a Nano USB pump and airstone to keep the water moving for the day while I prepared the new rack. I also added some insulating panels to the wall to keep the heat in the room. Once I had the 3/4" plywood cut and painted for the bottom shelf I leveled the rack. I was then able to move the 40B to its new location. To move it, I drained another inch or so water from it and had someone help slide if off the old shelf onto the new one. It wasn't as sketchy as I was fearing, not as heavy either with a bag of eco-complete and little water. I refilled it immediately and didn't lose any fish in the process. Next since the major construction was done I added heavy vinyl curtains to act as doors. Then I placed the new tanks on the rack and got the heater running to get in dialed in. I will still run the individual heaters in the tanks until I'm confident the room will stay warm enough. I added the warning label for any visitors. I added thermometers around the room to monitor the temperature. I picked up a full 4x8 foot sheet of 1/8" thick glass from a local shop to begin making lids. I have the shop cut the sheet in half to fit it in the back of my truck. Once home I set up a work table in the garage on sawhorses, carefully slid the glass out and begin making the cuts I need. I like making the lid opening 5" wide and clipping the corners for the airline heater cord to enter. Lighting next, for that I use all 36" Finnex Stingray lights. Had a small issue mounting them under the shelf as there is metal supports in the way. I made some quick spacers out of scrap wood and used Kreg jig to make pocket screw holes for mounting them. It worked great and I could finally see easier having the lights installed. All the lights on both racks are controlled by a single Kasa wifi timer. Really the last thing left to do is layout and install the air system, connecting it to my first rack. The air system on the first rack is run off a Linear Piston Pump the same one sold by ACO. I use 3/4" pvc and #10-32 tapped plastic airline valves. I like those because they can be used for both air and water. I mocked up the loop on the front of the rack to get the measurements required. I'm using 3/4" barbs and vinyl tubing to connect this loop to the original one. Once laid out, I took everything apart to drill and tap the holes. Dean's tip of using a piece of tape to make a straight line is excellent for lining up your marks along the pipe. I like to use an automatic center punch as well to mark the holes and prevent the drill bit from wandering when starting the hole. Nice and in line. Both air loops now tied together. With the air in I was able to trim and install the mattenfilters in the new tanks. I found its really nice to cut the foam using hot foam cutting pen. While rearranging everything I did lose a lot of storage space. I was however to clean out some old junk and boxes and fit all the my supplies into bins under each rack. I did fit a small plastic shelf in between the racks for some additional storage. This morning I finally filled all the tanks and got them running. I already have some new fish in the rack, some Red & Blue Colombian Tetras. They came into my LFS and I set up one tank this week to house them. Without the mattenfilter cycled yet I added cycled sponge filter into the tank. I realize this a quick breakdown of how I expanded into a fishroom so please feel free to ask any questions you may have. I look forward to adding to this thread all future breeding projects and builds.
  21. The small CoOp Filter Media bag fits a Python perfectly to keep from vacuuming up your little friends. Aquarium Fish Tank Filter Media Bag WWW.AQUARIUMCOOP.COM Easy to Fill and Empty Keeps Loose Filter Media Contained Less Mess During Filter Maintenance Keep your loose filter media better contained with a...
  22. This seems like an ideal place to log the changes in my tanks, and get opinions on issues I'm struggling with. You'll notice a trend in most of my aquariums -- collectoritis. I'm at the stage of fishkeeping right now where I can't fathom a species-only tank. My schooling fish are all in sufficient numbers, but I still love the variety. I think I have an even bigger problem with plants. Over the past year I've just been buying all the plants to find out which ones grow (it's a secret, no one knows). I'll post each tank in order of acquisition. 1. Living room display, 40 breeder, initially set up August 2019. Below is what the tank looked like back in October. Started it out as a super-artificial scape, and then I realized how much I liked live aquatic plants and began adding them in droves. After some experience with subsequent tanks, I went back to this one for an overhaul. This is what it looks like today (changing the substrate was a B-and-a-half): The tiny sword plant you see in the lower left corner of the first pic has grown into the giant sword plant in the second pic. The floating moss ball was a recent addition from the Co-op, and while it arrived in great condition, I am cursed when it comes to growing moss. I just can't figure it out. Stocking: Angels, rosy tetras, maccullochi rainbows, australian rainbows, otos, powder blue dwarf gourami, and emerald corydoras. 2. Dining Room, 20 tall, initially set up September 2019 I wanted to breed bristlenose plecos. It didn't take long before I saw baby bristlenose all over the glass, at least 30 of them. Unfortunately, they dwindled one by one over a period of two weeks - no idea why. There was one survivor, which has grown 2+ inches. But since that initial spawn, I've only seen white eggs that the male pushes out of the cave. Any tips to get this back on track? In addition to the plecos, it's housing my wife's platys from her classroom tank (she's a teacher) which are breeding, as well as breeding endlers and cherry shrimp. Stocking: Male and female adult and one juvenile bristlenose pleco, platies, endlers, cherry shrimp. 3. Daughter's tank, 20 tall, set up October 2019 My daughter (8 years old) wanted a tank for her room. Trying to move her away from the artificial plants but she likes them too much. So I just have to keep doing bleach dips every month or so until I can get the lighting balanced (upgraded her light recently). The lighting upgrade seems to have negatively affected her live water sprite, though. Used to be lush and green and now seems to be falling apart. Stocking: Platies, platy fry, green fire tetra, sunset honey gourami, pygmy corys, and guppies from my wife's classroom tank 4. Son's tank, 20 tall, set up November 2019 My son (6 years old) loves dinosaurs, so we went with sort of a prehistoric jungle theme. Stocking: Zebra loaches, panda corys, cherry barbs, purple harlequin rasboras, and one platy (offspring from my daughter's tank) 5. The livebearer tank, 40 breeder, set up in February 2020. In the dining room next to the pleco fail tank, I have guppies, platys, and cherry shrimp breeding up a storm. I started with just guppies in the 20 tall in October, trying to breed the fancy strains from my LFS. I could never keep a single one alive for more than a couple weeks. I had purchased some already-pregnant females, which gave birth and died. I raised the fry and let them breed as well, and it looked like I was getting some strong stock out of them, so I set up this 40 breeder to let the guppies do their thing. Simultaneously, my daughter's platy was having babies, which I also added to this tank. Because of how much feeding I was doing, I added panda corys and cherry shrimp to the mix. But then in March/April, there was an outbreak of some horrid bacterial disease. My corys were happy, my shrimp were breeding, and the platys were thriving. But for several weeks the guppies died one by one, then two by two, then five by five, etc. I probably lost 75% of my guppy stock. Maracyn didn't touch it, nor did . What ended up working was kanaplex, though it crashed the cycle. Should've quarantined... I didn't lose any corys or platys during all this drama, though. I decided not to buy anymore guppies and just let my surviving endlers and guppies breed. Things are doing better, so much so that I've been able to grow out enough stock to trade in at my LFS. Also trying to grow java moss glued to foam (removed from my bonsai tree because nothing was growing). Stocking: Guppies, endlers, endler/guppy hybrids, platys, panda corys, cherry shrimp, and amano shrimp Note: The background in the above tank, as well as the cave, were DIYs that were intended for tank number 6. However, I wasn't entirely satisfied with the result and found a better DIY method online. Still, didn't want the first background to go to waste. 6. The Bedroom Display, 90 gallon, set up February 2020 Sometime in December, I dove into a large DIY project. I had 1/2 inch glass cut to custom dimensions so it could fit in a particular space in my bedroom, and I siliconed it all myself. Tank dimensions are 55"L x 17"W x 24"H. I also built the cabinet/stand and created the foam rock background . The tree used to have the moss I mentioned above, but recently changed it out for subwassertang. I plan to buy more of it soon. Every plant in here is exploding. I've had trouble keeping cardinal tetras alive. Can't tell you how many I've purchased, but the 15 or so left in here are doing well now. I've lost far fewer rummynose. This tank is just so much fun to look at. The rainbows and corys are always spawning, the forktails play in the spraybar current, the rummynose stay together and swim back and forth, the amano shrimp are big enough to stay visible and crawl all over the rock wall, and the gourami patrols the tank like it's his job and eats from my hand. The cardinal tetra just sort of exist and look pretty. It's the first thing I see when I wake up in the morning. Stocking: Cardinal tetra, rummynose tetra, boesemani rainbows, forktail rainbows, pearl gourami, otos, julii corys, and amano shrimp. 7. Betta in the bedroom, 16G fluval spec, set up June 2020 My wife wanted a betta tank, so we got one, tank number 2 in the bedroom. She made all the aquascaping and stocking decisions. New tank so still sorting out the algae, fert/light balance. Another christmas moss floater, doing better in this tank for some odd reason, but still don't have high hopes. Stocking: pygmy corys, white cloud mountain minnows, and betta BONUS: Quarantine bin Learned my lesson with those guppies, so I'm quarantining now. I'm trying to add a few more cardinal tetra to my 90G. I've had great success with aqua huna fish, except for their cardinal tetras. This time around, I ordered 20 and put them in this 10G sterilite container. I lost 9 of them over 48 hours, but the remaining 11 have been alive for the past 6 days. Still don't look great, though.
  23. For Christmas, I bought myself a regulator, diffuser, and all the necessary stuff to put CO2 in one of my tanks except I still need to go to a gas supply place and get a bottle and I'm going to get one of the drop checker things that changes colors to indicate if the co2 level is good in the tank. As I was looking on Amazon and other websites last night, I saw a splitter thing that you can get to run several tanks off of one bottle and regulator. Has anybody done this method? I have several tanks I would use co2 in, but having a bottle, and regulator for each tank would not only be expensive, but would take up a lot of room in my small room.
  24. Sloppyscaping: instead of separating micro culture plants and painstakingly gridding them out in ADA soil, you grab handfuls of guppy grass, slap a rock on the bottom part, anchor some in pool sand, and call the hair moss intentional. It will not win awards, but your husband won’t divorce you for spending more money on Anubias than you do on food. And it leads to some cute moments like this one: This is just meant to be sort of a picture journal of experiments and failures in aquarium keeping. New to the hobby so if you see me try something that will result in complete disaster please do intervene! the Sloppyscape, A Gupster’s Paradise. I am not sure how many mutts are in here but there are also Corydoras julii, MTS and ramshorn snails, and pond snails that feed other fish. 40g with a canister filter, trying to figure out what else could go into it. I am playing with the idea of trying to do some kind of Pandaria themed tank with panda guppies, and potentially panda corys? I have a variety of 5-20 gallon tanks I could use, but am not sure where to start with stones or plants. I have a 12 gallon rimless nano with an integrated back sump that I would like to use, but I’m not yet sure how intense the flow on the pump is or if it can be adjusted.
  25. I was browsing the co-op blog and saw this article about an alternative to moss walls. I'm interested in trying it out and have most of the plants I'd need, but I'm a little hesitant about spending $50+ on the mat, as I'd do this for a 36g tank. Has anyone tried this out, or done living walls in general? If you did, how did it turn out, especially in the long run? Was it worth it?
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