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HH Morant

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Everything posted by HH Morant

  1. I think for a mechanical filter you can just clean it when it gets dirty enough that to impede flow. I have stopped using mechanical filtration in my canisters. That way I don't have to clean them as often, and they are much better biological filters because I don't clean them often. I have found that using 30 ppi foam in the canisters with zero mechanical filtration makes my water more clear. See www.aquariumscience.org.
  2. If you put them in a bucket until you have a chance to set up a 10-gallon tank, you will need an air stone in the bucket to maintain a flow near the eggs, and you will probably need a heater. When you move them to a tank, same thing, plus a sponge filter. There are several you-tube videos that you will find helpful.
  3. I have had the same issue with my angels. I see the eggs and think "I will take them out tomorrow." Then tomorrow they are gone. Once they have been fertilized you have to take them out. I have my first batch of free-swimming angelfish fry now in a 10-gallon tank. Initially, I took the eggs out and put them in a 5-gallon bucket, where they hatched. After 3-4 days, I moved them to the 10-gallon tank before they started free-swimming. They are about a week post-hatch now and they are all free-swimming. I have heard that mature angelfish can raise their fry. My angels are only a little over one year old, so maybe they are not mature enough.
  4. I liked Squid Game. The version I saw was dubbed, not subtitled. And I agree last episode was not as good.
  5. Test the water! A seasoned substrate is not enough to cycle a tank. Bacteria in a bottle doesn't help. Nothing you can pour into your aquarium detoxifies ammonia.
  6. I just move the cave to the grow-out tank.
  7. Bacteria-in-a-bottle products don't work. If they worked, nobody would ever cycle a tank any other way. Why would they? If bacteria-in-a-bottle products worked, there would not be hundreds of videos out there on how to cycle tanks without them.
  8. Just make sure they are big enough not to be eaten.
  9. If you can eat off it, it is not going to kill your fish. I wash my hands with soap. I rinse them. I stick them in my aquarium.
  10. Light from the window is probably contributing to hair algae (and other algae).
  11. From Aquariumscience.org: Fin rot should be treated with broad spectrum antibiotics (Thomas Labs Fish Mox, Midland Vet Service Aqua-Mox, VetDepot Amoxicillin, Fishbiotic Ampicillin, Mardel Maracyn 2, SeaChem KanaPlex, Thomas Labs Fish Min, API Fin And Body Cure and Thomas Labs Fish Doxy). These antibiotics ONLY work when mixed into the food. They do NOT work when put into the water of the aquarium.
  12. Hair algae is often caused by too much light. Evaluate for too much light from your fixture, from the light fixture in the room, or from a window. Light intensity is as important as the amount of time the light is on. Any sunlight at all really makes hair algae grow.
  13. If you go to Amazon books and search for "aquarium" there are a few freshwater books listed. I like aquariumscience.org, which is not a book, but could be.
  14. People eat plants that are fertilized with manure. I think you'll be OK.
  15. I have never drip-acclimated a fish, but I usually float them a little while just for temperature adjustment. The plop and drop method is based on the assumption that, after shipping, anything you drop the fish into will be healthier than the water that has been in that bag with the fish for 48 hours. Bringing fish home from the LFS is different. It's not an emergency to get the fish out of the bag because they have been in there less than an hour. Still I have a hard time believing that the fish died from the shock of a different water condition, since it seems unlikely that your water is drastically different from the water they were in before. It is not clear from what I read on this thread whether there were symptoms before death or how long it took the fish to die after they were put in the new tank. It looks like it was 4 or 5 days between the time the fish were brought home from the LFS on the weekend and the time when the last fish died. The apparent health of the remaining fish at the store tends to indicate a lack of disease, but, as Tihshho points out, dozens of fish from that tank may have died, we just don't know. I like the aquariumscience.org site. The author has changed the way I approach filtration and I tend to consult his site when I need to know something. I think he is right about most things. In this case, I don't know how we can ascertain why the fish died. They died after being introduced to a new tank, but post hoc ergo propter hoc is a famous fallacy.
  16. OK plants need trimming. Just letting them grow to get ready to transfer plants to new aquarium.
  17. The higher your ph, the more toxic ammonia/nitrites are. I recommend you read the whole article on "Ammonia, Nitrite, Nitrate, and Chlorine", but here is a chart from that article at aquariumscience.org:
  18. You have not said anything about your filter. We talk about cycling the aquarium, but it might be more helpful to look at it as cycling your filter. Beneficial bacteria needs a relatively rapid flow to to live and multiply in great numbers. If surface area in the aquarium were equal to surface area in the filter, we would not need filters for biological filtration. While some beneficial bacteria does grow in the aquarium, there is much more beneficial bacteria in the filter than there is in all of the surface area inside the aquarium. This is because of the rapid flow inside the filter. If you have a cycled aquarium at work, take some of the filter media from that aquarium and put it in your home aquarium filter. You are right to use water changes to control the ammonia. You will need to keep doing that until the aquarium is cycled.
  19. I have a lava rock substrate in my 120 gallon and it works fine. You linked to home depo pebbles, but they are probably going to be too big to be practical. I used 1/4" lava rock gravel that I bought from Bonsai Jack. I used a sieve to get rid of the dust and particles smaller than 1/8". I am considering adding and under gravel filter to my tank. That will be a project, but I have already ordered the under gravel filter.
  20. I have to reach down into the tank. The pill gun is not long. But it can get the root tab 3-4 inches under the substrate surface if you insert it up to the hilt.
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