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quikv6

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  1. I just upgraded to a 75, but I had a 40 long that really was a wonderful tank. The 4 foot window is great, and it's relatively short so it's easy to service. 40 long would be my .02 cents. They aren't the easiest tanks to find, though.
  2. Thanks Cory. I appreciate the reply. I have been changing water based off the Nitrates. It seems to result in a necessary weekly 25% change, to keep them around 20ppm. I pre-treat the water w/baking soda, let it sit a day, then test and change it. It's manageable that way, since I am only changing out 10 gallons. With a larger tank, I suppose I can get away with less water changes. I was just worried about any PH shock when I do, since it would be a greater volume. I guess I am overthinking it. Thanks again!
  3. Hi all, Please forgive my newbie question/status. I am relatively new to the hobby, and have been running a 40 long tank with Mollies and Platies for about 6 months. Needless to say, they have been multiplying, and I am considering moving to a bigger tank. (75 or 125). - On to the context, and then the question: I have currently been adding 1 teaspoon of baking soda per 10 gallons of water for water changes, to assist in buffering the soft NYC water, which has very little KH and a PH of around 6.6-6.8 out of the tap. (I have some crushed coral mixed in as substrate also). This method seems to yield moderate KH, with a PH of 7.6-7.8, which has been working for the livebearers. I currently do the water changes w/5 gallon buckets set up w/ baking soda the day before, but this obviously wouldn't work with a much larger tank. I would go need to go right from the tap to the tank w/the Python. - What would be the best method of adding baking soda safely "during" a water change with the tap-to-tank method? (Dose the tank before? Dose it after? Have a pre-mixed gallon that I very slowly pour in as it's filling?) I want to avoid any "shock" and rapid changes during/after a water change. Thanks to all in advance, and thanks to the "coop" for a wonderful forum/business/education.
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