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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/04/2024 in all areas

  1. Learning the hard way, I think quarantine should be on the list. 🙂 Also, I wish people would start saying "Bay-ta" again like they did from the 70s to the 90s. 🤣
    5 points
  2. *ich happens, deal with it! If you aren't willing to take on the proper care of another sentient life form, you should get a pet rock.
    3 points
  3. Use water, enough to keep the fish fully submerged Don't eat your fish unless civilization has come to an end and you don't possess a proper can opener Watch them daily and enjoy them as much as you can Other than that, the rules vary from person-to-person.
    3 points
  4. Don't buy a fish without doing thorough research on that fish.
    3 points
  5. I know how to deal with it if I can’t get it to do what I want. But I was wondering…is there a way to get this algae to grow along stuff instead of growing up? I really liked how it looked at first. But then I started getting out of control lol. And if not then how do I get that pretty algae to grow along drift wood. I think it’s the same kind of algae they make “moss balls” out of.
    2 points
  6. I've recently started feeding Ken'sFish Ultra Meat Wafers as was recommended to me by @Guppysnail to my cories and they love them. Its a bit dirtier then some more expensive foods I've fed, but it is ultimately very cost effective and a decent food.
    2 points
  7. OK... I, by no means am even remotely educated about Cory breeding. That being said, I feed my Corys (both Albino and Peppered) an every other day rotation of Repashy, Xtreme Bottom Feeder Wafers withan occasional canned green beans, a sliced cucumber or zucchini... The Albinos are constantly spawning. There are Eggs all over the glass weekly. The Peppers are still too young, b ut I imagine they will also be spawning quite a bit. They also get whatever hits the bottom from feeding the rest of the Community tank ( Xtreme pellets, Bug Bites pellets and flakes, Brine Shrimp, BBS, Mysis Shrimp, Blood Worms and Freeze dried Tubifex).. so they get a LOT of variety in their diet.
    2 points
  8. @Mordecai13 When did you get the Ludwigia? If you just got it recently, it could be melting because of a shift in water parameters/lower Co2. I've had ludwigia under a pretty high flow HOB filter with minimal issues (except for it growing slightly curvy, but that might also been because of lighting). What i normally do if im trying to plant stems i use a plant weight tied to 5ish stems and let that sink to the bottom letting it grow its own roots into the substrate. When i burry the bases right away, the stem tends to rot. Unrelated to your topic, is that an anubias on the left of the first picture? If so, the rhizome will rot if planted like that, you can burry the roots, but not the rhizome part which the roots and leaves are attatched to. Hopefully this helps!
    2 points
  9. You could send me a personal message or post it as a topic if that works better for you, or you can write it on a shared document on Docs. If you don't want to give me your email, a personaal message is fine.
    2 points
  10. I wanted to highlight another awesome fish we currently have in stock! We have a few really healthy looking Royal Farlowella listed for $49.99.
    2 points
  11. I have answers! 1. Editing can be done on the Google family of services. Paragraphs on docs. I will do the formatting. I want to make it digital and physical if possible. I have some self-publishing experience. 2. Yes, this info is critical! We need all that you mentioned here. 3. Yes, info on snails and shrimp is critical. I would also include frogs, but I'd need an expert on turtles. 4. That's okay! Testimony is a powerful tool. If you have recommendations from beginner to beginner, that is very helpful. I still consider myself an amatuer, I'm on year 6 of fishkeeping. If we are going to make this a reality, we could use any help available. Also, to prevent copyright issues on images, I think it would be great to ask people on this forum to contribute pictures, as well as possibly asking for Cory's permission to use images from his store/videos. Thanks for showing some support!
    2 points
  12. I will be willing to help, but first I also have some questions and ideas: 1. How is editing going to be done? Will it be a document or PDF, or will people write paragraphs directly into this discussion? 2. Besides having all the genuses, you could also have some basic information, such as the most effective way to do water changes, how to cycle an aquarium, and as you mentioned earlier, a list of beginner mistakes. 3. Include some sections on invertebrates, aquatic reptiles, amphibians, and even plants. Out of the aquarium books I have read, I don't remember seeing anyone mention anything about snails, so this if you are writing a book, including invertebrates and other organisms besides fish would make it more helpful than other aquarium guides. 4. I am still a beginner fishkeeper, so I am not sure how much help and information I can provide, but if you are willing to let me in with this project, I could organize all the information into a paragraph, edit, or some other job you would want me to do. The only animals I have kept are Guppies, Nerites, and Endlers.
    2 points
  13. Find where the tank will go and use the footprint to determine what to get. I restarted with a 35 and just replaced with an 88.
    2 points
  14. I started with a 20. Had it for years. Finally set up a 40. But got my hands on another two 20s, another 40 and a 75. 😁 once my 40 is pretty self sufficient other than feeding. Ima figure something out for the 75.
    2 points
  15. My step up aquarium was a 29, and I have no regrets. The footprint isn't that much larger than the 10, and the extra space isn't a budget buster. If you want to skip a few steps, go to the 75. I also have a 55 and a 65, but It seems like all of the extra vertical height is wasted, and maintenance on the 75 is easier. I've always found it curious that before bowfronts became available, with the exception of a 40 cube in my local PetSmart, I've never seen any other sizes in a store. The only aquarium choices around me were 5,10,29,55.
    2 points
  16. I went from a 10g to a 29g. It’s a great size to be able to keep a bigger group but small enough that cleaning it isn’t a huge chore. Also, purchasing equipment (if you’re buying the pieces separately vs as a kit) will not break the bank. It’s big enough to notice in a space, but still small enough to easily find a spot for it in just about any room. You’ll feel like you have a much bigger tank without feeling overwhelmed. I loved mine when I first got it and still love it even after setting up a 75g (especially the total cost of the 29g vs the 75g 😁). You’d also be able to house a bit bigger fish if you so wished, though not in huge groups.
    2 points
  17. If anyone's looking to get into this stuff as a hobby/pastime/folly (ie buy their own device), I'd suggest starting with a dissecting microscope or stereo microscope. I'd stay away from the traditional lit-from-below, slide-mounted-subject compound microscope to start. Stereo scopes don't need the subject to be mounted on a slide, so you can view 3d subjects. They're lit from above via external lights, often on bendy-type arms, and they are more commonly available with binocular eyepieces. The don't get right into the cells in terms of magnification, but they absolutely bring the the micro into the macro, ie you see details you never would with the eye, or a camera. Typical magnification is 10x - 40x, so you won't get pics like the great ones posted above, but for id'ing aquarium/fish pests/diseases, and for capturing/photographing the myriad "what's this critter" critters, they're a big help.
    2 points
  18. Don't buy dead fish unless you are going to eat them. Very important rule. I wanted to take this seriously, but I've read almost everything in some beginner-level books.
    2 points
  19. Specifically I used a 10g with a false bottom. Conditioned the sexes separately for a week. Introduced them to the breeding tank and then pulled them after three days. I use fairly soft water but I do that for everything I breed out of habit. The fry are infinitesimally small, so you need paramecium or infusoria for the first week or two or three. I keep half the tank dark, just in case the eggs or fry are light sensitive, but I have no real idea if they are or not. (Again I should probably take notes).
    2 points
  20. I regularly take extra plants, fish, and shrimp to an LFS in Houston. Of course I put the stuff into boxes, and often used one of the boxes that 24-packs of bottled beer come in. One time I walked in carrying a different kind of box and the owner said "What's wrong? Did you quit drinking?"
    2 points
  21. Red is dead. Clear leaves are already dead and beginning to melt back. The RR treatment ph prunes them quicker than them just deteriorating in the tank.
    2 points
  22. Setting up an outdoor, ecosystem pond. Inspired from a stream from a mountain that I visited. Under gravel setup with the Easy Flow kit. Run with the Co-Op Air Pump with battery backup. USB solar panel. The air pump effectively operate 24/7 by itself with no additional electricity. I lived in Southern California so there is a lot of sunlight. The battery backup will last the entire night after the sun is down, and charge right back up as soon as the sun is out again. I run the air pump at 90% instead of 100%. The battery backup do not last the entire night if I use 100%. I don't think it really impact the flow. It speak to how effective the Easy Flow Kit is. One potential issue is the long-term accumulation of detritus at the bottom of the tray. A solution is to remove the curve tubing of the airlift. Insert a hose down and drain out the detritus occasionally. Items used: 40 gallon container. x4 8x8x16 cinder blocks. 1 bag of Pea Gravel. ALEGI Plastic Grid Divider Tray from Amazon. Soshine Mini USB Solar Panel from Amazon. Aquarium Co-Op Easy Flow Kit. Aquarium Co-Op Air Pump with battery backup. Black vinyl tubing. *to fill in the gap between the under gravel tray and container.
    1 point
  23. Ok awesome I was thinking 5-6 maybe? I know he was. But that was the only option at the time. He was in there for quite a while to be honest. Just couldn’t afford any thing else. If you go back into the introduction part of the forum I explained why lol. I named him Bubba after his incident.
    1 point
  24. 🤔Some of mine might be dead, they haven't moved for a while.
    1 point
  25. them rocks kept dying on me, i had to give them up!
    1 point
  26. Here is my video, most of the interest is in the beginning and the end, we got distracted in between
    1 point
  27. Fish keeper have wildly different fish preferences.
    1 point
  28. For every rule that we as a group can come up with, there will be valid or sensible exceptions. So to answer your question, if we're taking this seriously (looking at you @Kunersbettas 🤣) then I don't think there is anything that everyone will agree is true, all the time. What a downer this guy is. 😕
    1 point
  29. These are very cool. A while back I did some snail eggs under a microcope and we could see them moving in their shells. There is lots of cool stuff to look at just by magnifying
    1 point
  30. I helped a new hobbyist with their tank purchase from petco and it was surprisingly challenging to really explain to them what to look for and make it a clear and concise issue. They ended up sending me photos and I took a few seconds and reviewed it with them. Essentially, the tanks are fine, but much like everything else what happens before the tank gets from Aqueon --> you is a major issue in some stores. Some stores store things correctly, others will use them to build forts! It's a bit ridiculous and so I would absolutely suggest things like verifying things in the store, check that the silicone is undamaged, leak tests, and all of these things can be done within the time of purchase and you can always still obtain that sale price on the tank itself. I have a 75G aqueon tank and it was something I didn't take lightly because that's a TON of water. I have gotten all of my tanks from petco and it's been something that I view as *the best thing* to get people into the hobby because of that affordability. If you want a "nice" tank, check out marineland. They do silicone well and the tanks generally are pretty beautiful. Lids aren't easily available and there are other issues with just general cost/availability of replacements, but that would be my other go-to. Seams: Check that they are not coming off the glass, that they are not scratched/damages and clearly have been abused. Especially on the bottom pane of glass, check that they bonded correctly. You can actually see a shift in opacity when the silicone starts to pull off as well as feel it. Also, understand that based on the size of tank, you have a different type of warranty. If you're buying a 10G as opposed to a 60 breeder, you have a much different quality of care compared to other things. Picture 1 - It's there from when they pressed the rim onto the glass. You won't ever see it, but it's there. Picture 2 - Often, yes. Picture 3 - Likely won't ever been seen. Picture 4 - No! This would often cause more damage than it would fix anything. I agree that the large bulbous edges on some of the beads would be prone to pulling off, but as long as they are bonded, then you should be fine. This happens a lot on the base of the tank, covered in substrate, you'll never see it and it won't ever be touched. Know your tank, be aware of that when scraping algae. This also will let algae grow in a very annoying spot, esp. bba. You can also just contact the store itself and tell them it leaked, if it's within the first 14-30 days (Not sure the specific window) I had one I purchased, set it all up, then I noticed a huge scratch on the front glass and returned it. It was a pretty deep cut from someone moving tanks or cutting the boxes and a blade went across it. Definitely feel free to go get more tanks, the new 60's are beautiful.
    1 point
  31. Green aqua has a video on testing as well as water parameters. It's a great place to start and open up the conversation about what you're looking for when testing things in the tank. The main thing is going to be what is your KH in relation to your GH, more or less? Things like fertilize regime, maintenance method and regime, those all play a role as well. Some plants can tolerate harder water (higher GH and KH), but others cannot. It really depends on what you're working with, seeing, and just responding to what the tank is doing.
    1 point
  32. 1 point
  33. Looks like 3 kinds of algae. BBA on the leaves, which is also indicative of the plants not doing well and those leaves being partially dead. Then you have brown and green diatoms on the hardscape (and some plants) BBA - Hydrogen peroxide and fix the tank balance as best you can. Could be circulation, co2, GH/KH, or a plethora of issues. Green diatoms - Too much light Brown diatoms - new tank, sand, silicates, too much light, or just needs maintenance. Most algae eaters and fish that graze on algae will eat green and brown diatoms.
    1 point
  34. Thank you! Appreciate it!
    1 point
  35. From a maintenance perspective, I have truly felt like the larger the tank, the easier to maintain. The tank sort of runs itself, to some degree, and just feels more stable. A 180 is the largest tank I have, and the waterchanges are the easiest I have done on any tank. I don't even get wet hands. Drop a pump in to pump water out a window. Hook up a python to the sink. Refill and dechlorinate. With that said, I'd say get the largest tank you mentioned...the 40 breeder. It is a great footprint with some dimensional depth, and lots of stocking options. It's also very easy math to figure out water change schedules and volumes. (25/50/75%...etc).
    1 point
  36. I really love my 29’s. My first one was my first “big tank”, and I learned a lot with it. They’re big enough that you can get bottom, mid-level, and top dwellers going, plants can really grow and get wild, there’s enough space for lots of things, and I personally like the shape and that they feel big. Yet, they’re small enough that maintenance is easy, you can reach the whole tank from one spot (unlike my 55’s), and they’re not a burden. Personally, 29’s might be my favorite size.
    1 point
  37. Looks like just regular old brown diatom algae 🙂 Diatoms rub off easily and are very common when setting up a new tank. Black beard algae is very stubborn to get off and looks very fluffy, usually in tufts. Usually they go away on their own after a little while. Algae eaters like Otocinclus, plecos and hillstream loaches love to snack on it. Diatoms pretty much always come with a newly set up tank so I wouldn’t worry too much about it. Just focus on getting your plants to grow and the algae will starve out and die!
    1 point
  38. I think a 40 breeder is a good size. I had a 20 high and I kept finding myself with problems involving species. Despite what people tell you, doing a pair of cichlids in a 20 HAS NEVER WORKED FOR ME. SERIOUSLY. Neither have gouramis. I think that a 40 breeder is a good idea, my second choice would be a 20 Long. 29's have good water volume, but aside from stocking quantity, are not much different from a 20 high, swimming space wise. With that 40, I would suggest getting a Pearl Gourami for your centerpiece, provided the space isn't too noisy. They are the least aggressive larger gourami. Cardinals are a good idea, and as for another schooler, here are my suggestions: Glowlight Danios (worked well in my 20 high) Praecox/Celebes/Furcata/McCullochi/Luminatus Rainbowfish (All beautiful rainbows, good for higher Ph water. Ember tetras (one of the only tetras that has worked for me)
    1 point
  39. Awesome I will check that out. I actually haven't been fertilizing at all yet. Tank is about 2-3 weeks old and I did use aqua soil. I do have lights on currently for 12 hours at about 30% I thought about maybe going down to 9 hours. Just really enjoy the tank being on lol
    1 point
  40. I went from 5 gallon right to 55, but then when I get into something I tend to jump in with both feet 😄 From talking with my LFS and other commentary I've seen around the forum, long tends to be preferable to high for schooling fish. Not that it can't be done, but most schooling fish do better with a decent amount of horizontal space, allowing them to swim more back and forth. But there is something really fun about a tall tank. With the proper planning and research I think you can make either work. For me personally, I'd go with the biggest yo can get away with!
    1 point
  41. My water parameters: pH 7.6 Nitrates 0ppm Hardness 75ppm Nitrite 0ppm Ammonia 0ppm KH/Buffer 40 ppm Water Temperature 79.3%
    1 point
  42. I could be wrong but I think that's just part of his gills. Can you put a mirror up and get him to flare at it? Might give you a better view. Or compare it to previous pictures of the fish if you can get them. If it was previously NOT there, that would be something to be concerned about. Gill irritation could be ammonia. Or if the ich treatment was an irritant, perhaps.
    1 point
  43. Anytime you're looking for linear piston air pumps, check out the septic tank supplies online dealers. Those air pumps are a relatively standard item for modern septic systems and those dealers tend to buy in larger quantities and sell more than any fish store could ever hope to sell. That means they can buy in larger volumes, often at a lower price and they're facing more competition in the marketplace in terms of pricing. While a linear piston air pump is long-lasting, they do eventually wear out, and for septic tank owners, they become a fairly common replacement item, so lots get sold for that use. You can sometimes find one at a lower price than through an aquarium retailer.
    1 point
  44. 1 June 2024 (Day 26) 2 June 2024 (Day 27)
    1 point
  45. Yes, Darters can be kept in a NANF community tank. I keep my Banded Darters in a 29 gal aquaponics setup with Rainbow Shiners, several Guppy / Endler hybrids, and _female_ Florida Flagfish. My temperature stays just under 70°-F with window air conditioner set at 65°-F. I swap out plants sometimes. Since taking this, I’ve added Basil and Mint.
    1 point
  46. Darters are AWESOME! But you need to get that water cold. Aim for 60°-F. My dream species to keep and breed is the Tangerine Darter. Just watch this…
    1 point
  47. 2nd dose of Kanaplex went in. The white dot you see there is a limpet on the glass.
    1 point
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