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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/25/2021 in all areas

  1. One of my favorite memories was back in the late 1960's when I wanted to put a baby sunfish I caught while out fishing with my dad into my 10 gallon tank with my neon tetras but my dad's said: "Don't do it, son." I said, "don't worry dad, neon tetras are the fastest fish in the world!" But when I woke up the next morning, there weren't any neon tetras in the aquarium, just a very plump baby sunfish. I miss my dad!
    8 points
  2. Hey all! I am a marine biologist located in the Seattle area. Interestingly enough, I worked briefly with Cory way back when, when he first started up aquarium co-op to advertise his business stealthily at an undisclosed national petstore chain while I was in college. I do not currently own an aquarium, but intend to hover the forum and help biology and chemistry related questions. I am a huge fan of biotope aquariums and I use to establish tanks and sumps and sell them. I am going to try to breed dragonfly/damselfly larvae as feeders for large fish. I will post tech articles on this when I get some trial and error under my belt In college I had a 55 gallon long tank with an eclectic mix of rejects that I adopted from said undisclosed national petstore chain customers. It housed a 6" gold siamese algae eater, 5" gold bristlenose pleco (m), 5 gold gouramis, a 4" convict cichlid, and an unidentified 2" sunfish. That tank was bursting with personality. The algae eater and pleco hated eachother and stayed in opposite caves on each side of the tank. The pleco would hoard hikari algae wafers in his cave and the algae eater would have to bravely try to steal them over to his cave. The convict cichlid was an absolute puppy who just wanted to be friends with everyone. He was actually the only surviving fry of about 10 that I grabbed to feed the sunfish. So he started life in my tank as a 2mm babe and within a year hit 4". When I graduated college I gave away these fish to a wonderful family who were putting them into a 250 gallon community tank.
    6 points
  3. He sure is a lot cuter than the pond snails I usually get as hitch hikers!! πŸ˜ƒ
    5 points
  4. He's been growing! Thanks for the feedback everyone!
    5 points
  5. This obviously does not include enough faces, so those of you who would like to add something/someone who would fit, feel free to download a copy of this and post it as well.
    5 points
  6. I grow cherry shrimp in an outdoor pond. I never get mosquito larva there, but I do get mosquito larva in the buckets I set out just for the purpose of growing mosquito larva. I get dragonfly larva in the cherry shrimp pond, but it doesn't seem to reduce the cherry shrimp population at all. As far as I can tell the dragonfly larva feed mainly off of tadpoles of which there are plenty. And the dragonfly larva turn into dragonflies and dragonflies are ruthless and efficient mosquito hunters. So I just leave everything be without trying to manipulate too much and it all turns out fine.
    4 points
  7. My featherfin catfish may be my favorite in the looks department, but this doofus is really winning me over in the personality department. His name is Igor.
    4 points
  8. My first memory was my dad getting a 10 gallon tank and some gold fish. I remember digging up earthworms in the back yard with him, and my mom fussing at him for cutting the earthworms up on her good cutting board lol. Eventually my brother took over the tank, and added these things called filters and airstones, and a heater. My fondest memory was when my brother saved up enough money to buy his own 20 gallon tank, and the old hand me down 10 gallon finally got passed down to me. I was so excited to finally have my very own tank. My brother taught me everything i knew about aquariums at that time. I kept that tank for about 8-9 years. Fast forward 25 years or so later and here i am now with my 55 gallon tank.
    4 points
  9. When I was in elementary school, I remember going to my neighbor's house to play and being entranced by a "huge" (I was maybe 6 so it looked huge, it might have been a 55) tank full of guppies and little bladder snails that was kept by my friend's dad. So when I won 3 little comets at the school fair, I wanted to make a tank just like that. My mom is not really an animal person, and keeping a tank was a big no no, but my dad was able to get a 2 gallon fish bowl in my room for them (I know, I know). There was a little tiny box filter in it, and he showed me how to clean it, and gave me a demonstration on how to siphon gravel. Needless to say, the little comets didn't last long, but it definitely was a positive memory that cultivated my fascination.
    4 points
  10. Being sick in the school nurses office in grade school and seeing a tank filled with guppies and snails. Listenting to her explain basic genetics, ecology, and animal husbandry in that context may have shaped my entire life actually.
    4 points
  11. Placeholder post for now. Will add more info later. Hi my name is Daedalus I'm breeding Copper Alien Bettas. I'm a new breeder with only 3 spawns. I breed Thai style so if you're uncomfortable with that style please proceed with caution. I write with terrible grammar and sentence structure. If you're uncomfortable with that proceed with extreme caution. Feb 2nd: Received copper pair. Begin conditioning. Feeding scuds, moina and BugBites Feb 6th: Prep spawning tank. 4.5gal tote filled to 3gal. Added loquat leaves, duckweed and pothos cuttings. Added rooibos tea for tannins. Taped a circular spawning cave to the wall. 50w heater Feb 18th: Release pair to tank. Feb 20th: Spawn. It took two days, the male had problems learning to do the wrap but he finally got it. Only one nip on the female and one on male. Very non violent, easy pairing Feb 23rd: Hatch. Can't see how many but looks to be a decent sized spawn. Feb 24: Added green water and infusoria culture to tank. Roughly half a cup. This is to cover for early hatchers/early free swimmers. Feb 25th: First feed BBS TBD March 10th: Partial water change. Remove male TBD
    3 points
  12. What is your favorite earliest fish keeping memory? Maybe you only started keeping fish a week ago, or maybe it was 50 years ago, what is your favorite fish keeping memory. I have a few: -Setting up my first aquarium when I was 14 with my Dad. Then going to walmart and getting decor. Then a day or two later we went to the fish store to get fish. And oh, the fish I saw! I was so blown away by everything "you can keep seahorses!" "starfish!" "dory fish"! oh man! Keep in mind this was a saltwater store, with some freshwater. -Also keeping my first betta when I was 7, named him swimmy (for obvious reasons). He was my best friend. I thought he would get lonely so I got pictures of cartoon fish and taped them to the side of the tank. Each picture had its name.
    3 points
  13. I've moved a standard aqueon 20 long with substrate and some rocks and plants in it, but with water drained and fish removed, and someone helping. I've moved 10 gallon aqueon aquariums with a couple inches of water and all plants fish and substrate still in it successfully, by myself. All were heavy and a pain. I'd drain your tank and remove the fish, especially since their seem to be some unknowns about it's history. I would skip the qt though (set one up, but you shouldn't need it for moving your tank). I'd get one, two, or three clean 5 gallon buckets for this, and have the new stand assembled. I think you'll be fine leaving the plants and substrate in place. 0) If you age or treat your tap water before adding it to the tank, fill up one of your buckets and age/treat it so that it's ready to add to your tank once your done moving it. I have a well, and I add water to my tank straight from the tap, so I wouldn't personally do this step. If you do do this step, you'll need three buckets, otherwise you only need one or two. 1) Drain the first 5 gallons from your aquarium into a bucket. Add your driftwood or whatever hardscape you want to remove from the tank to this bucket. Also move your fish to the bucket at this time. 2) If using a second bucket, drain the next 5 gallons. If you use one bucket, you'll have to replace 66% of water with new water, if you use two, you'll only need to replace 33% of the water. If you do age or pretreat your water, I'd drain and keep two buckets of tank water. 3) Drain the remainder of your tank water, this goes down the drain (or waters your plants or whatever). 4) Remove the tank, put the new stand in place, put the tank back. 5) If you have two buckets, add the bucket back without any fish in it. Use a colander at the bottom to avoid stirring up your substrate. You can use a pump if you'd like, or if you can get the bucket higher than the tank, you can gravity feed the water in. Or you can pour it. If you're only using one bucket, fill with water from your tap about halfway. 6) Add your hardscape and plants back in, and your fish from the first bucket. 7) Add the water from the first bucket in the same way you did in step 5. 8 ) Lastly, top off the tank with your aged/pretreated new water, or from the tap.
    3 points
  14. I would give you the πŸ† reaction, but, um... I've hit my limit. πŸ™€ Thanks @Daniel!
    3 points
  15. any size siphon you like will work. as for vacuuming the gravel near the plants. get as close as you are comfortable with, and you can just suck the debris off the top near the plants. there is no need to totally clean the gravel. especially with plants that is counter productive, as that debris as it breaks down becomes plant food.
    3 points
  16. 1. No that is sufficient size 2. Rainbow sharks are notoriously aggressive both at feeding time and if any fish strays to close to it's perceived territory. I would be worried about him with smaller fish. If you raise angelfish from babies with tetra and rasbora and guppies they tend to be more docile as adults. Guppies also like to nip fins sometimes so watch out for that with your angelfish. 3. It is best to get the tank fully cycled, add plants, and start bioloading first so that the bacteria does not go through "shock" when you add the fish. Adding smaller schooling fish first helps them get settled and established before you add larger fish, reducing stress. 4. Natural angelfish behaviors will only be seen if you have a school of them or a bonded pair. I would also omit the rainbow shark from the list
    3 points
  17. Nice! Welcome back to the hobby! Sounds like a really fun community tank! My only reservation would be about the rainbowfish, since they like hard water vs. a lot of your other fish. Guppies love hard water, but they're super flexible. Instead of the rainbowfish, I might suggest a small school of larger tetras like emperors or diamonds (just make sure none are fin-nippers who'll torture your angelfish), or a larger livebearer like swordtails. That rainbow shark might be a little too aggressive, too, for your rams and pleco. Might want to do a school of corydoras instead. For your first tank denizens, I'd start with the smaller fish like the tetras or guppies, then work your way up in size until you're ready to pick out your glorious pleco and angelfish πŸ™‚
    3 points
  18. Yes I have been using them for over 50 years. Don’t fix what isn’t broken. In a seasoned (not cycled) tank, what more can you ask for? Look up from the bottom of a tank with UGF-you can see all the roots.....happy roots
    3 points
  19. Another few days, another update... This project is definitely coming along! I am so anxious to get it setup, but know we have to take our time to make everything safe for the fish, and our home. We are still working on reinforcing the interior frame of the dresser. Engineer husband is overkilling it, I think, but best to make something that can support twice the weight, in my opinion. The used tank is about 13 years old according to the date tag... So - I need your expert advice. Should I reseal it? The guy we bought it from had just drained it the night before, and claims there are no leaks. I kinda feel like, it's empty now, what better time to reseal it and give it a new starting point? some of the side silicone is definitely chewed up from cleaning in the past, so I am leaning toward yes. I've never resealed a tank before, but I've watched 1,000 youtube videos, and am handy with a caulking gun so that means I am qualified, right? Hahaha.... Tips appreciated. I figure, worst case scenario, we have to buy a new tank and lose a few hundred bucks - OR - I have to call in someone who knows what they are doing to re-re-seal it, so it's worth a shot..... Thanks for coming on this crazy journey with me. Here's the stand with the new hardware fully installed - center handle needs longer screws, hence why it looks crooked. Will fix that. Canister filter will fit in the center door area, and we did not need to cut the drawers to add the reinforcements, so this will definitely prove to be GREAT storage for foods and extra supplies. Anyone have any DIY tips for creating a lid? What lights are you using on your 60" or larger planted tanks?
    3 points
  20. My earliest favorite memory is when I was about 12 years old, I had bought some angelfish at the pet store and they grew up. I came home from school one day to find that two of them had laid eggs on a side of the tank. I excitedly called the store to tell the guy that owned it my angelfish spawned, but was sad the next morning because the eggs were gone. The next time I went into the store the owner talked to me about how to raise the babies and gave me a piece of slate to put in the tank for the adults to hopefully lay eggs on the next time, which they did. That got me going down a huge rabbit hole of breeding angelfish.
    3 points
  21. I am all for anything that gets forum members to read the guidelines! (However tacofied it might be)πŸ™‚
    3 points
  22. Thanks, everyone! I had an extra Ziss valve lying around (came with the Ziss hatchery, ironically I wasn't using it LOL), so I hooked that up and now it works perfectly. So, definitely the USB Nano pump can provide enough air at least to two lines, but you need a valve on each line. Also added the check valve down to the hatchery. Thanks for that reminder!
    3 points
  23. How high is you PH and GH? As long as it isnt crazy of the charts high, they should be fine. Over time fish can acclimate to your PH. Wild PH swings chasing it around up and down before they can acclimate to it is usually the biggest stress on fish. Much more so than a stable PH, be it stable high or stable low. Stability and consistency is the key.
    3 points
  24. I too have so many. That first fish is certainly one of them. But, the older I get more and more of my fish memories pertain to people. My father and that first fish, and so many great friends that I have met over the years. Especially since since some have passed away. I sure do miss sitting around that fish show and talking into the night with friends.
    3 points
  25. Just a small update! I ended up getting an orange bee shrimp and an amano today to help clean up the film. There's also been some brown algae that started showing up. They seemed to settle in pretty easily and have been eating plenty! The very first thing the amano did when I released it in the tank was land on the biofilm covered driftwood and start eating πŸ˜› They seem to be favoring the java moss covered wood currently.
    3 points
  26. Easily choice: "Helping" my mom dig our fish pond. I was 5 I think so I probably wasn't actually helping.
    3 points
  27. When I was 5 I think. I won 2 goldfish in at the fair. They were fantails. One was Calico the other was a solid gold body with white fins. They were beautiful. Unfortunately I was 5 and my parents knew nothing about fish. We had them in like a 2 gallon bowl. The Calico lasted maybe 6 months the other lived 8 or 9 years. Then I had a betta in the same bowl for maybe 2 years and then a common goldfish in a 5 gallon that died while I was away at college. All those fish were won at the same fair stand. I learned about proper fish keeping shortly after I got the last goldfish because I went to a highschool that specialized in marine biology but my parents refused to let me buy a larger tank. After that I didn't have fish again until about 2 years ago when we got a 5 gallon for my daughters room. Now I'm planning out a rack of 7-8 tanks for the basement, a new tank for my daughter (she's been asking for a betta) and changing out my 29hex display tank for a 36 bowfront (the hex is very hard to aquascape)
    3 points
  28. Some orangetips golden white cloud at 6 month old
    2 points
  29. When I am on a boring zoom call. LOL
    2 points
  30. I have an elk sanctuary.. up to 15 in the yard daily.
    2 points
  31. More shrimp and bottom-feeder snacks! I recommend cultivating these natural food sources, when reasonable.
    2 points
  32. I did the same thing and totally forgot about it until now. I lived by a pond as a kid so I turned my plastic little kiddie pool into a place for tiny fish, tadpoles, frogs and anything else I could find. Thank you for reviving that memory!
    2 points
  33. It is common for fish owners to overreact and do what I call too many water changes. Thus why your ammonia, nitrate, and nitrite are so low. Slow down take a deep breath. Your sister's betta, although looks from the pic to be exhibiting stress behavior, I do not see any active bacteria film or hemorrhaging. Which is good. Let's tackle this step by step: 1. Too many water changes can upset the bacteria balance in the water and ultimately cause spikes, typically at night. Go back to the normal 20% weekly (or 10% bi-weekly). 2. Stop moving the fish back and forth, let him acclimate and settle in. Each move causes stress and is more likely that the bacteria will take hold. If you notice strong deterioration or stress behaviors I would go ahead and move him to a hospital tank and do a full treatment of medications prescribed above. 3. If you have access to high protein live foods use them (daphnia, hyalella, cyclopidae, etc.). I would steer clear of live what are commonly called black worms and red worms for now as they have a higher rate of parasites transfer. If you do this your chances of survival and eventual regeneration of fin membranes goes way up. Keep in mind that bettas are the most neglected animal in the aquaria hobby alongside goldfish. If he does kick the bucket is not your guys' fault. Don't take it as being bad fish owners or give up on the hobby. It happens to the best of us πŸ™‚
    2 points
  34. No worries, you are right mostly, she could have undone it for many of those years, but was largely unwilling. Now my mother is running into some age related memory issues that make learning new skills very difficult. It is ok Daniel, I think we are good here. The question of whether it is unethical to silo a group of people is just a little weighty for a retail store to tackle, but I understand @quikv6's struggle with thinking about this. Maybe a good idea, since the topic has wandered quite a bit, would be to end this thread here, and if further discussion is wanted we start a new thread in the "Off Topic General" section. We can quote back to this thread to provide context to the new one.
    2 points
  35. My favorite tank is my 65 gallon. It has a single koi angelfish, a pair of super red bristle nose plecos, and schools of Lake Kutubu rainbowfish, black neon tetras, lemon tetras, and Corydoras panda. I really like the way the colors of the rainbowfish and tetras complement each other. If I was doing it again I think the only thing I'd do would be to skip the plecos. There's really nothing wrong with them; I've just discovered that I'm not a big fan of plecos in general. I know your tank is much larger than mine, but if you also like this mixture you could do larger schools. In particular, you should be able to do a group of angels instead of just the one.
    2 points
  36. Love this topic!! My earliest fishkeeping memory is setting up a tank with my Dad when I was a kid. I have no idea what size tank it was but i remember we had swordtails. I also remember being amazed by a gar at the fish store. It is a strong memory of doing something with my Dad from my childhood. Why this topic strikes so close to home for me now (some 40 years later) is that my daughter expressed an interest in fish keeping recently. That was all the incentive I needed and we just set up her first tank about 2 months ago. Now I'm enjoying the hobby through a totally different perspective and relishing memories with my Dad!
    2 points
  37. I love that King of Diy sticker in the top right! It really suites this project! Here was a diy tank stand that I have. I did not make it but I bought it off kijijji (canadian version of craigslist). It came with a 36ft 40 breeder, and has space for a 20 long underneath or one 10 gallon and a 5 gallon. I currently have my 10 gallon QT tank and all of my fish foods/ other dry goods. The lights are out because I am dealing with a green water problem. Usually there is a towel over it to kill the green water, but I took it off for the picture. The water level is low on purpose, I have an angelfish that loves to jump and there is a place for him to jump out of the tank on the lid. So until I fix the lid to better acomadate the angel the water level will remain low.
    2 points
  38. its not a real live stream without corys "cat and dog" anology.
    2 points
  39. My earliest fishkeeping memory is also my earliest memory period and goes back to late 1964 when I was two years old. My Dad had come home from work and fed his Angelfish which he kept in a heavily planted 400 Liter, roughly 106 gallon tank that had a steel frame and which my brother later told me my Dad had built himself. He was barefoot, in jeans and a white t-shirt, sitting in his easy chair and smoking his pipe, relaxing, life was good. He died the following year from shrapnel he had received during WWII when his tank had its turret blown off. A piece of shrapnel had traveled to his brain and blocked blood supply, he died in his sleep, My Mom later often told me that keeping fish and raising them, and also breeding Canary birds was his way of dealing with all the ugliness he had experienced during the war.
    2 points
  40. Not my earliest memory but a happy one. Riding my bike several miles to my local fish store. Fixing a small clip-on duffel bag to the frame to carry 2 inflated plastic bags containing platies and moss home.
    2 points
  41. I know what you mean here--my mom is very much the same way. However, there are worlds of difference between siloing vital services from a vulnerable population, and a basic retail experience. Comparing these two things is a little apples and oranges. In my mom's case, you are right that she wouldn't know how to deal with an online order, or contact customer service online, but my mom would have gone to the store in the first place. And believe me, she has NO problem going back and reading everyone the riot act if she is unhappy about any little thing, So I think in this case the only people who can get online orders are also people who are saavy enough to figure out how to contact customer service online. In that way it is completely ethical. The whole online world is inacessible to my mother. Mostly that is a choice she made 20 years ago, that she now is unable to undo. Ironically, my 96 year old grandmother is likely watching a youtube video and forwarding emails to her facebook friends in Sweden this very moment.
    2 points
  42. I have been using UGFs with powerheads for decades, and now use a UGF in the planted tank. Yes there is going to be "gunk" underneath. When moving my 75 gallon, I removed and cleaned only one plate, leaving the other intact. after restarting, a brown cloud blotted out everything. 3 hours later the water was mostly clear. 5 hours later the water was perfect. The new non UGF tank took 1 week to clear up. I prefer using a powerhead over an air pump. There is no way to know how much water an air pump is actually moving thru the filter. The powerheads are quieter and provide greater circulation and oxygenation. You can shorten the lift tube and hide the powerhead behind a plant or rock. They also prevent my Nerites from vacationing in the UGF. The UGF will limit you to a coarse substrate. Dirt and sand will probably clog it. Maintenance is usually no more than a deep gravel vac. If you want to go deeper, a siphon hose in the lift tube or one of the other access points will remove extra gunk, mulm, poo, etc. My planted 29 gallon tank has an air driven UGF and a side mounted HOB. A power head in this tank was too much for the small fish. The HOB provides flow across the tank as well as filtration. I have very hard water, and thanks to the air stones, this is the only tank that I have a problem with scale and mineral buildup on the sides and top.
    2 points
  43. Mr. B, I agree with Mr. Billy. Figure out where your baseline is and work with that. By the way, I'm assuming you have had this condition from the beginning and not something that has come up lately? Just checking because that would be a whole different story.
    2 points
  44. Undergravel filters get a bad rap. In reality, they are great when operated and maintained properly...otherwise they can become a nitrate factory. > The gravel needs to be 3-4" of medium to small grain size as large gravel lets too much 'stuff' to get pulled down under. Even coarse sand could be used along with a layer of weed fabric on top of the UGF plates. > The air flow needs to just be moderate. At some point folks thinking they'd get more filtration upped the air pulling water too fast through the gravel only to draw decaying organics deep in the gravel and under the plates. Modest air flow pulls water slowly and gently through the substrate. > Like any filter, it needs to be maintained by routine gravel vacuuming to remove unwanted waste (just like you'd service any filter). This may not be necessary with fine substrate material. (e.g. if I was to use a fine gravel or coarse sand with a modest air flow, water pulled through the substrate bed would be slight and not pull organic solids down under). πŸ™‚
    2 points
  45. https://aquariumscience.org/ has quite a bit of information on under-gravel filters (UGF), including efficiency ratings of various types of filters. The website author, a chemist, cites articles from peer-reviewed academic/scientific journals. He presents the information in a tiered formatβ€”from Aquariums for Dummies to Bill Nye the Science Guy. As a former lab tech, I appreciate the inclusion of scientific papers, although admittedly I do not feel the urge to slog through them myself. Zzzzzz..... Thankfully, the author has done this for me. 😍 Be prepared to read some controversial notions. The author unabashedly accepts the labels, "contrarian" and "chip on his shoulder." From his intro page: The first paragraph from the Review of Aquarium Filters page gives you an idea of website's tone: Have fun! πŸ€“
    2 points
  46. My thought is that if you're in that category then either coop is your LFS and you just pop in for a looksie or it's not your LFS and you don't know they exist.
    2 points
  47. My basic recipe varies a bit as i am still experimenting with ingredients but the most well liked so far is as follows. 3/4 cup finely powdered Chia seeds 1/2 cup of dried powdered Kale !/2 cup of Spirulina Powder 1/4 cup of each of the following dried and powdered, Split peas, Raspberry leaves, Dandelion Leaves, Parsley, Dried Bloodworms. 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder. mix well and I keep it in the freezer to maintain freshness and just mix what I plan to feed immediately. I have used this basic recipe on two groups of Otos purchased from Petsmart with great success. *Disclaimer. This is my experience and result, I am sharing here in hopes that others can get the same or better results but I can not guarantee any thing. Please if you try this share your results. but try at your own risk. If you find this works for you share for the benefit of the hobby, or if you find a better recipe please share your modifications.
    2 points
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