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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/26/2020 in all areas

  1. I was down all of yesterday with a sinus flare-up (thank you, weather change). As a result, I spent the day in bed. Never been so grateful for the decision to have a tank in the bedroom. This was my view every time I woke up.
    6 points
  2. Goldfish fry! Almost two months old (discovered him on November 5).
    4 points
  3. Email shipping@aquariumcoop.com for excellent customer service. Forum members may have additional maintenance tips.
    4 points
  4. I was going to do an update on my Ruffle Sword Flower today, so I went to get a picture and it wasn't there! I went searching for it and found it peeking out of the top!!! That's around 6 inches of growth since Wednesday afternoon. Pretty impressive! Can't wait for it to blossom!!!
    4 points
  5. I couldn't accurately sex my ricefish until they started spawning, but now I've gotten pretty-ish good at it. The females tend to be a little larger and fatter, with shorter anal fins like you and kammaroon said. The male's anal fins remind me of a skirt. I attached a picture of my ricefish, I foolishly put fast-moving orange ricefish with transluscent fins on orange substrate, so...it's also outlined for you. You can also see the size difference. Hope it helps!
    3 points
  6. I have a pair of Apistogramma nijsenni that spawn like clockwork in a heavily populated community aquarium. Twice recently I have borrowed the breeding cave with eggs attached and and let the eggs hatch in empty aquarium. You can see that the fry from the the first batch look like groupers compared to the fry from the second batch. I have also dropped some angelfish eggs and pygmy sunfish eggs in this aquarium also but I don't think either of these are likely to hatch.
    3 points
  7. Last week I got my first pair of Apistos. A really great pair of Apistogamma, Agassizii Super Red. Hoping to get this pair breeding in the ACO Apistos caves I have. I have them in a 10 gallon now. The female develop a slight white fuzz on a scale. I added a low dose of Fritz salt and it's clearing up.
    3 points
  8. He said they were all males, so if they start breeding, he may be able to make enough money from the news spots to buy a new tank. 😉
    3 points
  9. If you were asking before you stocked the tank I'd have advised against it, but since you're already there, and since you said it's working okay, then stay with it and don't worry about what everyone says. If the opportunity to switch to a larger tank comes along in the future that would be a good thing, but in the meantime just enjoy your tank.
    3 points
  10. I was watching KG Tropicals stream tonight and looked over at the Discus tank and noticed my breeding pair chasing fish away from the front corner of the tank. They’re guarding about 15 wrigglers.
    2 points
  11. Because of space limitations, I've been keeping only 2 tanks - both 29g. I've wanted more and bigger tanks, but I have to wait until our living arrangements change. In the meantime, I've been considering setting up and aquascaping one of my empty 10g tanks as a cherry shrimp habitat. Same issue arose, though. Where to put it. Then I had an idea. If I pack a bunch of books and move out a bookcase, I can put a 10g (or two!) in the same space the bookshelf currently takes up. Considering I'm a writer AND an avid reader, bookshelves are sacrosanct, but shrimp would be worth putting books away for, I think. Where there's a will, there's a way, right?
    2 points
  12. here r mine: sajica parents taking their babies out for a walk
    2 points
  13. Sounds like a fun project! I think the trick with small organisms with a short generation is to use massive expansion followed by repeated bottlenecks. In other words, make your 18 shrimp into 180+ (until you run out of space, food, or patience), find the most colorful or interesting 18, cull the rest, and start over. I work with genetics in my lab job. What you are looking for is a spontanelusly arising mutation or recessive gene. The fastest way forward is a pure numbers game. Once you get something cool (any unusual color in this case) you THEN select toward that thing. Say you get one pinkish shrimp in your first 180. You keep it and your 17 healthiest shrimp. Then by the next 180 you should have several pinkish shrimp, and so you repeat. Once you have 18 healthy pinkish shrimp, you then choose for the darkest pink, etc. Your wild type shrimp theoretically contain the potential to deliver any of the colors known in neocaridina. It is just a matter of breeding an insane number, and watching closely for the odd balls.
    2 points
  14. I understand your dilemma. I'm sitting here at my desk with a 20 gallon long tank on the file cabinet at my left and two 5.5 gallon tanks end-to-end across the right side of the desk, with a 65 gallon community tank and a 10 gallon shrimp tank across the room. There's a 9' wide by 6' tall section of bookcases behind me, with about half hardbacks and the rest double-stacked with paperbacks. It has occurred to me more than once that if I moved some books out I'd have room for more tanks, but then I remember that I've been keeping fish for less than 2 years, and enjoyed recreational reading for about 50 years, so so far the books are still there (and I still enjoy reading them).
    2 points
  15. easy to dig books out of a closet if needed. id go for the tank.
    2 points
  16. Posting a day late, but I currently have humpback limia fry of various sizes in my 40 breeder.
    2 points
  17. Hi everybody! I'm new to the forum and recently "returned" to the hobby a few months ago. I say returned because I had tanks as a young child(around 10 years old) but never got too deep into the hobby due to lack of parents. Anyway, I currently have 5 tanks in my relatively small apartment. I got two tens, a five, a 3.5, and 20 long. 20 long not set up yet but I got it at a dollar per gallon sale. One of my ten gallons is essentially a quarantine tank, just a gravel bottom and sponge filter which I use to house my wild caughts when I catch them to sell and keep for myself. I live in central florida and within the state there are many species valuable to the aquarium trade. Species I have collected myself so far include golden topminnows, bluefin killifish, a couple different species of darter, as well as what looked to be a couple of small cichlids but I did not keep those as they would definitely eat my other wild caughts. My other ten gallon is a planted tank with substrate of about 2/3 of the bottom area in sand, and the remaining is aquasoil. For plants in this tank I have an anubias, Ludwigia repens, lemon bacopa, red root floaters, java fern, cryp wen red, amazon sword, and one other that I'm not able to identify. Also some moss. For fish in this tank I have a single super adorable pea puffer and 5 otocinclus. Pea puffer I've had about a week and the otocinclus ive had for over a month now, maybe 2 months. I felt very confident in my water conditions as I only had a single otocinclus die within the first 12 hours of introduction. Not bad considering the sometimes high mortality rate of otocinclus. I'm extremely interested in breeding my fish as I'd like to help reduce the number of pea puffers especially that are removed from the wild. After a week of having my pea puffer I've already decided the 20 long is going to be dedicated to some of them. Any advice on breeding either species would be much appreciated as well as a good setup for the 20 long. Anyway, my five gallon is also a planted tank the homes my betta. I've had him for over a year now and just a couple months ago did I get him into the planted tank. Substrate is fluval stratum with some lava rocks underneath the subsrate for bb colonizing. Plants right now are what I believe to be a water onion, as well as some lemon bacopa, Ludwigia repens, and a couple cryps. I did have the top covered in duckweed for the first month and a half of setup to make sure there weren't any nitrogen spikes that may harm my betta. My 3.5 is currently being turned into a black worm culture to keep all my fish happy as my wild caughts can be hard to feed sometimes. Pea puffer hasn't seemed to take to those yet. Seems more interested in all the snails in my tank lol anyways that's what I have so far sorry for the long post! Any questions, comments, concerns would be of value to me.
    2 points
  18. I've stuffed a bit filter floss in a gap to stop shrimp from climbing out on the cords and airline.
    2 points
  19. I think it really depends on which tank inhabitants you have. Some fish are specifically known for jumping out of tanks. Some snails are known for going walkabout. I've never had a Nerite, Ramshorn, Assassin or pond snail leave the tank. But my first mystery snail left the tank the first week we had him. And that tank was completely covered! But he was big enough that his shell pushed up the plastic lid as he moved and he was on the floor by the time we found him. Sheesh...I was a nervous wreck! So, it's really up to the individual person and the individual fish/snail. If you are more comfortable having a cover, then have one! We ending up running a strip of packing tape along the plastic lid on the above mentioned tank and the snail couldn't move it after that. I've also filled up spaces with baskets of plants, allowing the roots of float in the tank. You can also use plastic mesh used for knitting projects. I saved all the pieces that I cut out for HOB filters back when I used those. Since I don't use them now, I'm able to put that spare piece back on the glass lid to fill the open space. I usually just let the lid sit on the airline tubing. It's never restricted the airflow as far as I could tell. 🙂
    2 points
  20. Agreed with Lefty, we gravel vac our tanks _somewhat_. Now, on Eco Complete for a Cory substrate, we’ve stopped using it on account of our Cory’s barbells getting ripped up on the sharp edges. Some folks will totally disagree. Maybe just keep a good eye on them.
    2 points
  21. You're not to late @Alesha You still have 11 days before the 3 wise guys show up, or in my case send out Christmas cards.
    2 points
  22. Your tank isn't overstocked imo. As a lot of other people have said just keep an eye on the betta. They may get territorial and rough up your other fish. Keep an eye on both the betta and the platies fins for signs of nipping. I'd say they are the most likely to not get along. None of those fish are schooling fish. Cories shoal (live in large groups but don't school) so they like being in groups at least 5or6 is usually recommended, but many people keep them in smaller numbers with no problems. Also once the tank is fully cycled there's no need to continue adding bacteria. The bacteria colonizes the surfaces in your aquarium and once it covers everything any bacteria you add won't survive. I'd just make sure you have a container capable of being used as a hospital tank if a problem pops up down the line and aquarium salt and/or meds.
    2 points
  23. You can leave the sponge in the tank during the med trio application. I also believe Cory suggests leaving the meds in the tank for 7 days before doing a 30% water change. After that, let them rest for a week or two. Then do another med trio treatment. Hope that helps. :)
    2 points
  24. @Alesha prompted me to get out the microscope to see what makes my green water green. And it turns out my sample of green water was full of a single cell phytoplankton of the genus Ankistrodesmus. I bet other forum members green water is the result of other phytoplanktons like Chlorella, but who knows. If anyone else has a microscope, it would be interesting to see what your green water looks like.
    2 points
  25. I'm a little late, but Merry Christmas! And wishing you all a Happy New Year. We treated ourselves to a dozen albino cherry barbs this week, so they are in quarantine. And I suspect some of our cash gifts and/or gift cards will end up being spent on some "fishy" things. 😄
    2 points
  26. Just wanted to tell both of you who replied thank you. The CO2 from the water department must be what is going on. The water hasn't set for 24 hours in the bucket yet and it has already made its way from 7.2 to 8.4. I imagine it will make it to 8.8 after the full 24 hours. I've got some neutral regulator on the way. I was hoping to run this tank without any additive other than dechlorinator and ferts but I really want cherry shrimp in it and I don't think they will do well at 8.8. Anyway thanks again for the advice.
    2 points
  27. I had a great Aunt that had tanks back in the 70's and 80's that got me started with fish. She had a little sun room with 4, 10 or 20 gal tanks and use to raise up baby guppies, black mollies and swordtails in large mayonnaise and mustard jars. They were probably a couple gallons. I can still see them up on a window sill. She was a really good fish keeper.. 🙂
    2 points
  28. You might want to invest in a hang-on breeder box like the ones from Marina and Ista. They pump water through the breeder box from the tank which solves the water quality issues you had with the specimen container. Essentially your fish tank becomes a sump filter for the breeder box. The breeder box stays at tank temperature, there's a nonstop supply of fresh water into the box from the tank and the water from the breeder box then flows back into the tank to be handled by the tank filtration system. They're typically under $30 and work great. There are grids you put on the outlet to keep the fry in the box, and for really small fry, a piece of foam or filtering material placed over it can stop even the smallest fry from escaping. You just connect an airline and adjust the airflow to the speed you want water to move through the breeder box. Mine is currently moving two teaspoons of water a second through the breeder box. If the sound of the water gets annoying, you can place a short length of airline tubing in the outlet of the lift tube and aim it below the water line in the breeder box. It'll restrict the flow a little, but silence the noise.
    2 points
  29. We have baby brine! The bad news is the majority of the eggs didn’t hatch. A lot of them settled on one side of the bottom, confirming that there likely wasn’t enough air. ALSO, I did my math wrong and totally miscalculated the water volume. It’s only three quarts of water so there may have been way too much salt. 🙈 At least I had enough brine to feed two tanks! I started a new batch tonight with only three tablespoons of salt and 1/4 teaspoon eggs. Added another USB air pump so hopefully the circulation is better.
    2 points
  30. Baby Rainbows Staeck Endler growouts- starting to color up Zoogoneticus tequila fry- hard to get good photos of these guys, they hide well and constantly on the move
    2 points
  31. Around my area and others I've been, the ones called peppered or salt and pepper corys are the paleatus species.
    2 points
  32. I have found in my years of fishkeeping that when you want to grow a tank of green water, you can't, and then when you do get a tank that turns green it's in a tank that you want clear.
    2 points
  33. Here they are corydoras paleatus. I think in different locales they are different species.
    2 points
  34. if the fish are healthy, dont look stressed, dont look crowded, enjoy them. this world is full of people who like to tell other people exactly what to do, whether they know what they are talking about or not. seriously, enjoy your fish, and quit worrying about what other people think. in life, other peoples opinions are worth exactly what you pay for them.
    2 points
  35. Back to check valves for a second. I like to put one as close to the aquarium as possble. We had a kitten who chomped some airline tubing just beyond the check valve and got a bit of a splash of water in her face. She tore through the house and when I went to see what had scared her, I found water pooling on the floor under the tank and the severed airline. I now put check valves right up at the edge of the tank to make it harder for an incident to drain the tank.
    2 points
  36. id go for 1 week is likely long enough, but if you have the time, 2 or 3 sure cant hurt.
    1 point
  37. @Johnny B. Goode if you are looking to keep shrimp, there are variants that thrive in hard water. If that's not something you want though it might be worth while to consider rainwater collection (if legal where you live) or reverse osmosis. Personally I think I might rather add in the GH and KH I need than add another chemical altogether to bring it down.
    1 point
  38. I would do another Couse of ich x
    1 point
  39. In saltwater they rely on the beneficial bacteria growing in the live rock in the tank and all the other fancy equipment is water polishing, nitrate/phosphate export, and buffering. I think that given enough time and managed properly, this is the same in freshwater as well. It probably is what ends up happening in tanks filtered with cartridges that are frequently replaced. The plants are the nitrate export, and the beneficial bacteria are all over the glass and decor and gravel. this has been so much fun catching up on this thread, I always learn so much. I’m constantly telling other people about the cardinal tetras on the Hindenburg now whenever people are getting them at work (I work at my LFS)
    1 point
  40. Thanks! This will be my project tomorrow--it's time for a water change anyway, so I'll mess around with it then and see what I can rig up! I have a pre-filter sponge on, but it never occurred to me to try a POST-filter sponge 🙂
    1 point
  41. Definitely use a check valve, the first air pump I set up a year ago did not have one and the pump fried the first time I hooked it up. I guess I had no idea water ran downhill. Put check valves on all of your air pumps in my opinion. It’s cheap insurance.
    1 point
  42. Yep, now you need another “quarantine tank”
    1 point
  43. Today I water tested my cycling tank and preformed a water change on a holding tank I prepared for a betta fish that was arriving today. Added some extra tannins, leaves, and a tad amount of salt. Few hours later, he’s arrived and is all well! I took photos of him in his little bag, and acclimated him afterwards. He was released into his holding tank, adjusted to the remaining parameters, and has been exploring and nibbling leaves since then 🥰
    1 point
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